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hoodie lum - A description of a self-styled "gangster" based on the hooded jackets popularly worn by young males on the streets.

e.g., Man! First der was the homeboy shortie pants. Den der was da lidded cap worn backass on d'head. Now y'got the zip up jacket wit da hood dat goes up to a peak on yer head. C'mon, boy, y'aint no hoodie lum less y'wear yer hood, in da nay ber hood!

submitted by Charlie Lesko

cureasow - A place to send someone who eats too much for healing.

e.g., At lunch today our pal Chris pigged out, grabbed my portion, and hogged all of the French Fries on the table -- so we sent her to Cureasow.

submitted by Frank J. Mandriota

cicada - An Islamic-terror subgroup, consisting of terminally-ill terrorists.

e.g., When you have a particularly difficult terrorist mission, forget Al-Qaeda. They're nothing compared to the fearsome members of Cicada.

submitted by Joe Kreiter - (www)

united nations children's fund - UNICEF, United Nations Children's Fund, formerly United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund. United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF - now United Nations Children's Fund) works for children's rights, their survival, development and protection, guided by the Convention on the Rights of the Child. The UNICEF is a United Nations Programme headquartered in New York City, that provides long-term humanitarian and developmental assistance to children and mothers in developing countries. It is one of the members of the United Nations Development Group and its Executive Committee. UNICEF.org en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UNICEF

e.g., Donate to help United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) meet the urgent needs of children.

submitted by Laginto

uttar - Hindi for "total," "complete".

e.g., After the storm had hit, the northern Indian states were in uttar pradesh (complete disarray).

submitted by kai

neurosmith - A master at neuropathy and spreading her own personal neurosis among peers for the sake of improving society.

e.g., Tammy has, in the past few decades, begun using my language -- acting with true foolishness and spreading her own neuropathy due to my being such a master neurosmith.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

feels - An extremely strong emotion about a certain movie, book, or TV show. Usually felt by fangirls or fanboys, and incomprehensible to normal people.

e.g., I suffer from Reichenbach feels and cry if I watch that particular episode of BBC Sherlock.

submitted by Sherlock

freerice - The world's only vocabulary game that feeds the hungry in association with World Food Programme. Play, learn, and donate rice with every right answer. Give free rice to hungry people by playing a simple game that increases your knowledge. FreeRice.com WFP.org

e.g., FreeRice increases your knowledge.

submitted by Laginto

waltoning - To announce that you are leaving, or signing off from a public chat, and then spend time saying goodbye\goodnight to each person and waiting for their reply. From the end sequence of "The Waltons", whereby each member would say good night to the other. {ED. Nice to see you back after all thiis time.}

e.g., She said she had to leave to catch a bus, but spent so much time waltoning, she missed it.

submitted by Mila Eighteen

troll-grazing - Var. on "troll-GAZING. Online activity wherein an individual surfs the web for commentaries on news sites and blog sites that will fill him with righteous fury -- thus self-validating his own positions and attitudes.

e.g., Three hours a day of dedicated troll-grazing left John feeling purer and more righteous than Sir Galahad of the Round table publicly rejecting the salacious overtures of Morgan LeFay's illegitimate Fairie offspring.

submitted by j t gillick - (www)

matriot - (MAY-tree-ut; n.) 1. Somebody female who loves their country; 2. Somebody, male or female, who comes from a country which their culture refers to as a "motherland"; 3. Any college or high-school student (mostly pre60s) who loves their alma-mater. [From "patriot," but using "mater" instead of "pater" as the source word.]

e.g., Abigail Adams was the paradigmatic matriot. | Misha is a Russian Matriot (since he comes from the Russian "Motherland"). | "All matriots should plan to come to the team spirit bonfire on Friday!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

smelldentical - (Pronounced smel-DEN-tic-ul, also sometimes sme-DEN-tic-ul (without the internal L sound); adj.) 1. Having the same scent, odor, fragrance, of whatever synonym of "smell" you care to use; 2. As suspicious (fishy, questionable, etc.) as some other dubious situation. [From "smell" + "identical."] Related: smelldentity, smelldentification.

e.g., That pizza is smelldentical to the kind we used to make at home. | Okay, what's going on? You look mighty suspicious. It's practically smelldentical to what Kirby used to do.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

neologist - One who coins new words. {Duplicate.}

e.g., With his coining of the word "meme" in The Selfish Gene in 1976, Richard Dawkins established himself as one of our most widely recognized and influential modern neologists.

submitted by J T GILLICK - (www)

sage - (v.) 1. To clean swiftly and thoroughly---astonishingly swiftly and thoroughly---especially when driven by a seemingly boundless enthusiasm; 2. To do anything swiftly and thoroughly, with seemingly boundless enthusiasm; (interj.) 3. Vocal recognition of an astonishingly swift and thorough cleaning job, performed with a seemingly boundless enthusiasm.  
 
[From the name of my daughter's friend, Sage, who seeing kitchen messy when she was over here one day, rolled up her sleeves and washed the dishes, cleared off the counter tops, and scrubbed the floor, in a single hour .... and seemed confused at our surprise.

e.g., "Wow, this room is filthy! How can you live in this pigsty? Clean this place up!" "I was gonna sage it, but now---" "Now you're going to clean it up anyway, right?" "... um, yeah. But you're not getting any boundless enthusiasm." | "I wanted a car wash, but they saged it! My car looks brand new again! And they vacuumed it and chamoised the windows and polished the leather, and even replaced the sparkplugs."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

vearly - A conjunction of very and early, describing something that's earlier than something that's early, on-time, or worse yet -- LATE!

e.g., Usually, my son's late. But, to buy tickets for a concert by his favorite musical artist? For THAT he's VEARLY!

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

siblikids - The children of one's siblings, nephews and nieces, combined (Kirsty Kurilowicz, 2007).

e.g., When was the last time you saw your siblikids?

submitted by Ariel Kurilowicz

richard parker - (n.) 1(n.) 1. A Bengal tiger; by extension, 2. Any tiger, of whatever stripe (pardon the pun), Bengali, Sumatran, South Chinese, Siberian, vel cet.; 3. A tiger who has been---well, not domesticated, hmmm---familiarized such that it is “safer” than the common run of Panthera tigris silvestris “[a] wild tiger”; 4. An ordinarily dangerous wild animal with whom some particular person or people can interact safely.  
 
[This is the name of the Tiger who shares the lifeboat with the title character in The Life of Pi. Asked why a tiger should bear such a name, Pi blames clerical error: whoever catalogued the tiger when it first came to the zoo put down the captor’s name as the name of the animal. Delightful story, that one. Magnificent motion picture, too.]  
 
It should be noted, of course, that NO wild animal is actually safe for human interaction. Certain people have managed to learn sufficient about the ways of primates to actually live with them, but most people don't know the first thing about primates, let alone all the other creatures with whom we have been entrusted. Remember: the reason people make such a fuss about docile wolves and whales and bears (oh my) is that it is so rare. Have some respect for the Tigers. In a fight, they win.

e.g., "Now, remember, stay in the compound! Do not wander off! Every year, it's the same thing: some macho idiot thinks he can walk around safe outside the compound, and I have to be the one to tell his family that African wildlife cannot resist the scent of an idiot, and so he got eaten by a crocodile or by a hyena or got torn to pieces by a hippopotamus or was gored by a water buffalo. These animals are not Richard Parkers: you cannot make peace with them! You are not Dr. Doolittle! You are not Eliza Thornberry! You are not in Narnia! Stay INSIDE!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

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submitted by

dislocuta - The anxiety brought about by the restrictive nature of language, and by extension, that brought about by the restrictive nature of any system of meaning. "Dislocuta" does not simply refer to the distress of someone who cannot express herself, but very precisely, the distress of the individual who cannot put her thoughts into language due to the boundaries of the system of meaning in which they take part.

e.g., The Occupy protesters suffered from a terrible case of dislocuta: the ideals they fought for could not be explained within the language of capitalism. | Adorno’s comments on the impossibility of poetry after Auschwitz typify the intellectual dislocuta prevalent in post-war Europe.

submitted by Ed Thornton - (www)

menausea trois - When three people, originally having sexual relations and living together, get sick of the arrangement.

e.g., At first, the menage a trois was a dream come true. But after a while, things began to lose their luster, and we grew sick of each other. Our happy menage a trois became a sickening menausea trois.

submitted by Joe Kreiter - (www)

political pourk - The vasts sums of money that flow to politicians for often wasteful and unnecessary hometown projects, all to help the politician get re-elected, and all at taxpayers' expense.

e.g., In my city of 45,000 motorists and pedestrians, car travel, at a confluence of three major downtown streets, was successfully regulated by a group of timed traffic lights. Now, in the system's place stands a traffic circular roundabout -- one expensive to build, not ever wanted by our citizens, and one that has created more problems than existed before.  
 
During the lengthy construction, a large downtown section was closed off, severely hurting several businesses and restaurants. Completion hasn't helped these local businesses. Many avoid the area -- the roundabout is too confusing, with yield signs covering three disparate directions. It's also too small -- large trucks regularly get hung up and block traffic for hours.  
 
There was much vocal opposition to the plans. Why didn't our elected officials listen? The money was already appropriated for the roundabout. A local politician was able to get legislative approval and funding. If it wasn't to be used to build it, we'd have to give the money back(!).  
 
This is the story of one political pourk project in one small community. Can we talk about the real big ones?

submitted by Charlie Lesko

departee - The exchange of witty goodbye comments, what-I-forgot-to-says, and last-minute cleverisms held in or near the doorway as you leave a party or other social gathering.

e.g., We tried to leave the Baer-Jonses' dinner in time to get home for Mad Men, but twenty minutes of low-rent departee screwed that pooch good.

submitted by J T Gillick

hipstory - The history of "hipsters" in world history, whether in art, music, film, politics, fashion, economics. . . .

e.g., You want to bring back beat poetry? Man, that's hipstory. (Beat poets were the "hipsters" in their day.)

submitted by Fazal Miles

- Adding a pseudo-spam entry to get a slot for adding a new entry from the back end.

submitted by

point blimfark - The speed at which a forward-rotating wagon wheel's spokes (or of any similarly discernible wheels) look as if they're rotating backward.

e.g., Trudy was straddling Fred in the backseat of a taxi going down a freeway. She looked out the window and noticed the motorcycle travelling next to them. The biker looked back at her, realized what she was doing, and promptly veered off the road into the guardrail. Trudy exclaimed, "Wow!" Fred asked, "What happened?" Trudy replied, "That bike's wheels hit Point Blimfark right before he wrecked."

submitted by Jimmy

undant - A part of the body that is used in place of a hand, especially when waving.

e.g., Jimmy had his hands full at the time, so when John waved hello to him, he used his elbow as an undant.

submitted by Jake Levin

daffynition - The second (intermediate) part of a PD entry; the description. | A statement that explains the meaning of a term (a word, phrase, or other set of symbols), as entered in the Pseudodictionary.

e.g., These daffynitions are enough to make one hysterical (take that as you will). | Ooops -- how embarrassing; I opened my very own version of the Pseudodictionary on 17 Apr 2004 with the word \"daffynition\" and yet never before thought to enter it here in the real PD!  
 
{ED. Mr. Berliner is certainly correct when he calls some of his submittals daffynitions. They are that and more. He doesn't care for my use of submittal, but I prefer to use that word rather than submission. I associate submission more with bondage, domination, sadism, and masochism than I do with submitting words to a site that's run as a lark. He must have mistyped his word, though, because it was flagged on entry as a duplicate. I'll come back later and merge the two entries, giving me a slot in the lexicon to use from the back-end.)

submitted by S. Berliner, III - (www)

pseudodentin - False teeth.

e.g., Do you have dentures? Yea, they're pseudodentin.

submitted by Liam - (www)

psychomortalic - Brain dead.

e.g., "Why hasn't Jim Ben to work lately?" "He's psychomortalic."

submitted by Liam - (www)

marsh-mellow - Wetlands that are calm and relaxed.

e.g., Having risked life and limb navigating treacherous rapids, I was relieved to steer my canoe into a marsh-mellow.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

sweetkraut - A friendly German or person of German descent. {Duplicate.}

e.g., August Leupold was a Sweetkraut. At his wake there was a beautiful bouquet of flowers signed Beloved Landlord! A very rare person.

submitted by Frank Mandriota - (www)

alzheimlich maneuver - An attempt to save the life of a choking victim, despite the fact that the "Heimlicher" has forgotten how to "Heimlich." {Duplicate.} {ED. Made me laugh out loud. Thanks for continuing to entertain the pseudo-partners -- two guys sharing the same brain our wives say.}

e.g., I don't know if it was the stressful situation, or if I just should have attended that refresher Heimlich Maneuver course. But for the life of me, when my friend was choking, I couldn't remember what to do! So, I put my arms around him from behind, and then the rest came back to me. Thank God! Even though it started as an Alzheimlich Maneuver, I was still able to dislodge the unchewed steak from his windpipe [Note:purely fictional scenario.]

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

lesbolshevik - (n., adj.) feminist.

e.g., Too many lesbolsheviks are occupying seats of power in Washington to suit me.

submitted by Karl Jahn - (www)

affaire de queue - (n.) a sexual involvement completely devoid of romantic sentiment.

e.g., Affaires de queue seem to be the order of the day, but they have no allure for me.

submitted by Karl Jahn - (www)

ethnophobia - (n.) irrational fear and hatred of one's own nation.

e.g., If you had told me thirty years ago that we'd elect as many ethnophobes to office as we have, I wouldn't have believed it.

submitted by Karl Jahn - (www)

ninjcompoop - A foolish or stupid martial artist.

e.g., Of course, our sensei is a black belt. Fast as lightning, he can beat the stuffings out of any attacker. But in a battle of wits, he's a defenseless ninjcompoop.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

aftergibe - (n.) a clever retort that comes to mind when the opportunity to use it has gone.  
 
Essentially the same is "L'esprit de l'escalier or l'esprit d'escalier (literally, the spirit of the stairway, idiomatically staircase wit) is a French term used in English that describes the predicament of thinking of the perfect comeback too late."

e.g., It was the same as it always is. My wit took the form of an aftergibe -- halfway down the stairwell.

submitted by Karl Jahn - (www)

cleavage season - (n.) spring and summer.

e.g., It's been a long time coming, but cleavage season is finally here.

submitted by Karl Jahn - (www)

xenocentrism - (n.) 1. belief that every other nation is somehow superior to one's own; 2. belief that the well-being of foreigners is more important than the well-being of one's own compatriots.

e.g., "If you ask me, I think we have entirely too many elected representatives inside the Beltway who are xenocentrists." "Umm, you mean like. . . ." "Yeah, the President. And more than half the Senate."

submitted by Karl Jahn - (www)

achladiomorph - (n.) a woman whose figure would be improved if the extra mass could be moved from her thighs and buttocks to her breasts.

e.g., "The achladiomorph in my office would have been a fun sexual encounter had her excess been apportioned properly; however, I have unsettling memories of pock-marked gluteals instead."

submitted by Karl Jahn - (www)

nosthedonia - (Pronounced to rhyme with lost-hee-TONE-ya; n.) This term has a number of seemingly discordant meanings, although it is supposed to be a simple antonym for nostalgia, which comes from the Greek: nos- "homecoming" or just “home” + -algia "pain, sorrow," together having come to mean "longing for home.” Nosthedonia, on the other hand, can mean 1. Delight at (finally) coming (or going) home; 2. The happiness of being able to talk to or skype with distant loved-ones; 3. Anticipatory delight for familiar faces and places (affecting both those awaiting someone’s return as well as the returners(?)); 4. The excitement of a welcome-home party, (especially a surprise welcome-home party); 5. The joy of recollecting home when you are (or are feeling) far away; 6. The wonderful feeling of heading home on Friday, especially for a long weekend (cf. sasumo) (also known as heimgehenfreude (q.v.)); but also (oddly) 7. Reveling in finally getting away from home and off to make your fortune (i.e., taking nostalgia literally, as in “home is a pain”); 8. The feeling when you realize one day that your brain now thinks of your new place as your “home”; and, finally, 9. The feeling you get when you talk to someone suffering from nostalgia while you are sitting in your own house/neighborhood/city or whatever.  
 
Defined elsewhere (and now here) by Karl Jahn as "the pleasure derived from things, persons, and situations that are old and familiar."

e.g., My son came home from missionary work last week; the nosthedonia at the airport smothered me in cotton batting. | "Wow, you look happy." "Yeah! I'm off to college!: Finally, life my way!" "Well, good on ya! Nosthedonia makes for a great trip." "Nostee---what? Is that Russian?"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

heimgehenfreude - (Rhymes with LIME-gay-hen-DROID-eh, or LIME-gay-en-DROID-eh; n.) 1. The feeling, actual or anticipatory, of going home for the weekend, especially 2. the feeling of going home for a long weekend. (From the German for "home-going-joy"... sorta.) (Cf. nosthedonia, sasumo.)

e.g., "Long weekend! What are you gonna do?" "I'm going surfing!" "My wife and I are going skydiving!" "We're gonna watch all of Monk straight through!" "I'm going to Boston to examine some very old coins ... perhaps I'll buy a few." "Whoa...this is good Heimgehenfreude."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

dftba - It stands for: "Don't Forget To Be Awesome." Typically used by the YouTube Vlogbrothers who I think made it up. Can be used as a goodbye. You can also just say don't forget to be awesome. It's technically an initialism, not a word. Could also stand for Damn fine to be alive, Delano fears to be afraid, Do fish take baths a lot?, Duel for the best acronym, Darling fetch the battle axe, Drunk fish try breathing air, Dark force to barely apprehend, Danes fear the burning acropolis, Donate for the blood association, Don't for the beaux's admiration, Don't forget that brains attract, Dead frogs teach bored anatomists, Damn Facebook too bloody addicting, Darkened forests take bravery away, Dastardly farmers took Bessie away, I came Down for the baby's arrival, Dogs frequently take back apologies, Distro falling through bleak autumn, Delightful fans that blithely assist, Debutante's fame tarnished by affairs, Doctor Freud's topic became afflicting, Decepticons fear this brilliant autobot, Delilah's fruitcake triggers belly-ache, But she was Destined for the burger anyway, Difficult financial times bring apocalypse, Dreadful feudal treachery breeds atrocities, Until your Dorky farting turdface brother arrives, and But the Dead father's thoughts became archival.

e.g., Tell her . . . tell her DFTBA.

submitted by Jocelyn

crimbasic - Religion-based word.

e.g., Gallup International Millennium Survey interviewed 57,000 adults in 60 different countries of the world between August and October, 1999, representing 1.25 billion of the planet's inhabitants. The survey covered a wide range of topics of an ethical, political, and religious nature, focusing specifically on issues close to people's emocracy, the United Nations, human rights, women's rights, the environment, religion crimbasic values --particularly those which will have an impact on the new millennium. Issues such as De and "What Matters Most in Life" were included.

submitted by John

naughdirt - Financially "naughty" practices, which are discovered during a "naughdit."

e.g., Because of the naughdirt that was dug up during the course of the naughdit, the CEO was forced to resign.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

naughdit - An audit, through which they find that someone was doing financially "naughty" things.

e.g., When they discovered that Jim was hiding money in an offshore bank, the everyday "vanilla" audit mushroomed into a full-fledged, no-holds-barred naughdit.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

cowherd - A person who has a morbid fear of being trampled in a cattle stampede.

e.g., Nancy, why are you so afraid of being caught in a stampede? We're in New York City, for God's Sake! Not a single cow for miles! You won't come outside with me? What are you? Some kind of cowherd?

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

cravoid - The object or behaviour associated with a craving such as chocolate, salty carbohydrates, sex, etc. that is used to soothe or calm the craving or underlying discomfort. Although primarily a descriptor related to cravings, it may also be applied to addictive substances and addictions.

e.g., The food craving research group learned the psychological technique and applied it when the desire for their cravoid arose.

submitted by Brett Porter - (www)

thrivival - The act or accomplishment of surviving and thriving. Thrivived (v) Thriviving (v) Thrivivor (n)

e.g., The infant's thrivival seems assured with such loving and competent parents attending to her needs and providing such a rich learning environment. | Despite his initial despair in his isolated situation, he was a natural thrivivor.

submitted by Brett Porter - (www)

staritoriality - (pronounced like "territoriality," with an /s/ before it; n.) The area over which a cat believes herself to rule, haughtily opening her eyes and flicking her ears toward interlopers (especially other animals) and then, after a few moments (during which, I imagine, the interloper is supposed to tremble in fear, lest her royal felinity command her retainers (that's us) to put them to death or feed them to something bloodthirsty)---after a few moments, her miaojesty slowly closes her Eyes (I always capitalize the Eyes of a cat for some reason) and regally turns away, allowing the intruder to remain ... or flies at it in a hissing and spitting, claws unsheathed, to drive it from her domain. [Coined by my daughter in reference to her cat, Piper.]

e.g., "I thought you were getting more ice cream." "I was, but your cat's sitting on top of the freezer doing that staritoriality thing they do." "So?" "Well, staritoriality creeps me out. It was, like, 'Open this freezer, human, and I'll scalp you.' So I just left."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

grumble-bragging - Ostensibly complaining about something, but really taking pride in it.

e.g., "You guys can come over, but my dad will probably make you do math problems like he does with me." "Ah, you're just grumble-bragging."

submitted by Robert Arvanitis - (www)

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submitted by

spyte - To speak, write and type the same time: (spahyt), spytes (spahyts), spote (spoht), spyting (spahy-ting). A spyter (spahy-ter) is one who types.  
 
Spyten (spit-n): Of a combination of the words spoken, typed, and written.  
 
{ED. Special characters didn't come through, so editing was necessary.} {Duplicate.} -- to flag the entry to come back to it.

e.g., You spyte when you use speech recognition software, which translates your speech to text. | Spyting is the fastest and most efficient way to write. | Anyone with a smart phone can spyte. | Anyone with an iPhone can spyte with Siri. | I have been spyting, instead of writing or typing, for several years now and I spote a book called Suddenly Sane. | Suddenly Sane is the spyten word as opposed to the written word. | I am the first spyter, but not the first to use speech recognition.

submitted by Mindy Scott - (www)

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submitted by

gromax - (noun) That part of your leg that sticks to the vinyl car seat when you're wearing shorts on a hot summer day. Note: This word was introduced on TV in the 1980s as a Sniglet.

e.g., When getting out of the car at the pool, I had to peel my gromax off the seat.

submitted by G. Tom Tsao - (www)

allardyce - [aka "Flint's Arrow"; n.] 1. A skeleton (or part of a skeleton) used as a pointer, marker, or sign; by extension, 2. A dead body used as a pointer, marker, or sign; 3. Any sign or marker made of bone; 4. Any "spooky" pointer, as in a Halloween decoration of some such. [From Robert Louis Stevenson's Treasure Island, in which Captain John Flint has used the body of one of his sailors (a man named Allardyce) as a pointer to his buried treasure.]

e.g., At the foot of a pretty big pine and involved in a green creeper, which had even partly lifted some of the smaller bones, a human skeleton lay, with a few shreds of clothing, on the ground....
"He was a seaman," said George Merry, who, bolder than the rest, had gone up close and was examining the rags of clothing. "Leastways, this is good sea-cloth."
"Aye, aye," said Silver; "like enough; you wouldn't look to find a bishop here, I reckon. But what sort of a way is that for bones to lie? 'Tain't in natur'."
Indeed, on a second glance, it seemed impossible to fancy that the body was in a natural position. But for some disarray ... the man lay perfectly straight—-his feet pointing in one direction, his hands, raised above his head like a diver's, pointing directly in the opposite.
"I've taken a notion into my old numbskull," .... Just take a bearing, will you, along the line of them bones."
It was done. The body pointed straight in the direction of the island, and the compass read duly E.S.E. and by E.
"I thought so," cried the cook; "this here is a p'inter. Right up there is our line for the Pole Star and the jolly dollars. But, by thunder! If it don't make me cold inside to think of Flint. This is one of HIS jokes, and no mistake. Him and these six was alone here; he killed 'em, every man; and this one he hauled here and laid down by compass, shiver my timbers! They're long bones, and the hair's been yellow. Aye, that would be Allardyce."  
 
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"Where did you bury them? I mean, the tundra's pretty big."
"I marked the spot with one of the mammoth tusks we found."
"How apropos: an elephantine allardyce as an obsequial obelisk."
"Clever."
"Thanks."  
 
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His Halloween maze was terrific: Through the old house and into the corn maze in the back yard, with an allardyce every now and then to mark the way. The fact they were all wearing sombreros and oversized sunglasses was a bit distracting, however.  
 
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submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

trystiny - A word formed by a combination of \'tryst\' and \'destiny\'. It denotes an involuntary appointment with some person or event (or missing of the same), which on hindsight appears to have no explanation other than that it is an act of \'Destiny\'.

e.g., They all agreed that it was just trystiny that brought him there when he really had no business being there there at the time; it had to be trystiny that sent him to save them from certain death. {ED. Thanks for your additions. They brightened my morning a bit.}

submitted by William Edwin - (www)

angerous - Angry enough to become dangerous, anger laced with boisterous emotion.

e.g., The news that his obviously undeserving colleague beat him to the pay raise made him very angerous

submitted by William Edwin - (www)

airified - Puffed up, proud, depicting oneself as something big, while in reality being just an "air bag."

e.g., We believed his jungle adventure tales till we saw a little spider scare him out of his wits; it turned out he was not quite as brave as he led us to believe, just an airified braggart.

submitted by William Edwin - (www)

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trinitty-gritty - That which is basic, practical and essential, as it pertains to the Catholic Church.

e.g., On March 13, 2013, Cardinal Jorge Mario Bergoglio, the former archbishop of Buenos Aires, Argentina, was installed as the Catholic Church's new Pope. Pope Francis has the reputation of being a reformer, and he could lead the Catholic Church back to the Trinitty-Gritty.

submitted by Joe Kreiter - (www)

inched - Misled, wrongfully informed.

e.g., I was talking to customer support and was inched. | No matter how honest I was, I still got inched. | Nothing pisses me off much more than to post a comment to an online discussion only to find that I had been inched and used misinformation.

submitted by sjdkjjs

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submitted by

emailstrom - (noun) Emaelstrom. Mesmerising or distressing electronic email delivery phenomenon of computers that have been neglected, sometimes for even a short period, where the viewer feels as if she has been pinned inside a cybercentrifuge (and there's another one for ya).

e.g., Each morning, she spiralled into the emailstrom of downloading messages on her computer and lost consciousness in the vertical vortex.

submitted by Brett Porter - (www)

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niff-naw - Niff-naw is a word to use when two people just start picking on each other out of annoyance. It usually occurs between two people who know each other pretty well -- such as family members (siblings usually). To niff-naw is to engage in verbal teasing, "picking" on each other -- it is never physical. {ED. It could get physical very fast in my family.}

e.g., Let's say you are two siblings sitting in the back seat of your parents' station wagon (c. 1963) and you are on a long road trip to whereever and you start verbally picking on each other and your mother turns around in her seat and yells: "Would you two stop niff-nawing, right now!" That's how you use it.

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dorian gray - Someone looking very pretty whose appearance doesn't change.

e.g., "There is, some scientists say, a real Dorian Gray among us — someone who, through a mixture of good genes, healthy lifestyle and timely medical interventions, will give every illusion of staying young throughout an extraordinarily long life." («The Sunday Times» 29.05.12)

submitted by Irina

dieversion - The version of a story, in which at least one of the characters dies.

e.g., When Shakespeare was writing Romeo and Juliet, he had the option of making it a light-hearted comedy. When asked why he wrote it as a tragedy, the Bard answered, "Hey, it's just a dieversion."

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

investigation - The investment of funds for the purpose of transporting water to a drought-stricken region.

e.g., When I was asked to donate to bring badly-needed water to midwest farmers, I asked, "You want an investigation? You think I give a DAM?"

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

cantthankaurus - A sub-species of the genus Homo Sapiens. Members of the class are distinguished by a constant sour and bitter demeanor and an inability to express gratitude.

e.g., Hundreds of thousands of restaurant wait staff, store and office clerks, civil servants, airline stewies, DMV employees, attendants of all varieties, English-speaking service telephone responders of various nationalities, and just plain folks who are kind enough to wait and hold a door open, or just allow a car to enter busy traffic at a stoplight, are negatively impacted, on a daily basis, by the growing ranks of the Cantthankaurus.  
 
While numbers of other species are rapidly declining to the point of possible extinction, the proliferation of this sub-species adds to the high stress levels of modern day life, and, consequently, to the chronically bad health, and temper, of Americans. It's a serious national problem.

submitted by Charlie Lesko

saranity - The peaceful feeling one gets when wrapping things in plastic.

e.g., Putting leftovers away in the fridge can be therapeutic. It fills me with a feeling of saranity.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

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rigi scan - An instrument used in male research to determine if patients are able to get an erection while sleeping. It measures penile tumescence and rigidity continuously. It has two loops, one to be placed around the base of the penis and the other towards the tip, that tighten every fifteen or thirty seconds.

e.g., The doctor recommended him to do the Rigi Scan.

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fruitabels - The little sticky tags placed on fruits and vegetables to identify and sell them.

e.g., Blech! When I bit into my apple, I accidentally swallowed the fruitabel. Now I feel sick. . . .

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procraftinator - Someone who postpones work and instead spends time on craft projects. A craft-loving procrastinator.

e.g., Instead of working on her chemistry homework packet that was due at the end of the week, Emma, the ultimate procraftinator, spent her study time designing a new t-shirt.

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comedic - Having to do with the various classes of cosmetics, the overall industry and scope of cosmetics.

e.g., Doris wore the look of a stunned grizzly bear as she entered the comedic wonderland of the new 12 acre beauty store. In fact, she would need all this makeup to cover the grizzly bear look she sported.

submitted by Doris Crinkle

humpy - /həmp pē/ (adj.) to exude a certain confident sexuality; one who oozes a sexiness that make your knees shake.

e.g., I want to go out with that humpy stud we saw at the gym today.

submitted by WayneSF - (www)

fingerwipe - 1. v. To wipe some goop, paint can trash, a fly/spider/bug/hair/poop, etc. from your fresh paint, food, or other project for the purpose of decontamination. 2. v. After having done the above, to remove said object from your finger onto another surface. 3. n. After having done the immediately above, the dried remnant of such.

e.g., Recycling old paint into fine art is one of Steve's hobbies. As a result, when brushing or rolling a surface, he often has to make a fingerwipe, occasionally using it as a fingerwipe on another piece of art.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

wafro - A white girl Afro or an unmanageable head of curly hair on a Caucasian.

e.g., Aww . . . look. Heidi's wafro is mad out of control today.| C'mon, son, you better pic your wafro. It's flat on one side.

submitted by heidi groth

spitting midget - A malapropism used to compare a young child with an adult member of a family. (Coined by my mother, Anna "Malaprop" Lesko).

e.g., "Michael, you take after your uncle, John. Shirley, you look just like your father. But Charlie, Jr., you're the 'spitting midget' of your grandfather!"

submitted by Charlie Lesko

baby jesus awesome - Pretty much as awesome as it gets -- at least according to the example, which comes from an Amazon.com review of Wheelmate Laptop Steering Wheel Desk. More reviews at the link provided. My son turned me on to "gut-busting" Amazon reviews by linking me to reviews for How to Avoid Huge Ships. I found reviews for Castration: The Advantages and the Disadvantages on my own, while I was looking for comments on the HAHS reviews. Some of the CTAD were ba-- gut busting, too.

e.g., "Adding this desk to my car's steering wheel has been baby Jesus awesome. I love e-mailing the Highway Patrol while I drive to let them know the tag numbers of cell-phone using drivers. Lordy!"  
 
Another review of the desk to end all desks, less a "baby Jesus awesome" reference: "Believe it or not, I'm typing this review on my laptop steering wheel desk! As a school bus driver I was never be able to check my e-mail and update Facebook while at work. Now I am networking more than ever! I am recommending this product to the school board later this month."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

annivorcery - (n.) The anniversary of one's divorce. [I don't recall the movie or series I heard this in, but it sounded very pseudo to me.]

e.g., Madison is weird: she just spent all day celebrating her annivorcery ... with her ex!

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

alcohol-aids - Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, contracted from unprotected sex with drunk partners. {ED. I use "{Duplicate.}" to flag entries I hope to get back to some day, not necessarily restricted to actual duplicate entries.}

e.g., Bill the Bartender might have received Alcoho-laids from his buddies, for bedding people whom he seduced with alcohol, but when he seduced his bi-sexual friend, using alcohol, he got more than he bargained for -- Alcohol-Aids.) (See? It really DOES matter where you stick your hyphen.) {ED. You're right, Joe K (Joke?), it does matter. I have a huge backlog of instances where a slight change in either punctuation or spaces can make a difference in what's being said. It will take a lot of effort to turn what I have into a tutorial on usage, and I may never get around to doing so. May never? Ha. Most likely never. For instance, there's a difference, sometimes, between "some day" and "someday."}

submitted by Joe Kreiter - (www)

alcoho-laid - Praise and recognition received for having sex with people with whom you've gotten drunk.

e.g., For getting women drunk, and "having his way" with them, Bill the Bartender received alcoho-laids from his buddies.

submitted by Joe Kreiter - (www)

trmm - A tactic deployed by the driver of an automobile, whereby the car moves as slowly as possible toward a red light in the hopes the light will turn green, thereby avoiding a full stop and applying of the handbrake.

e.g., "Oh really," responded Charles, as he trmmed toward the four-way junction by the department store.

submitted by Robin Armstrong

presster - A combination of the words pressure and pester. To coerce (someone) by annoying her or him with frequent, persistent requests or interruptions. {Duplicate.}

e.g., Because of their parents' demanding jobs and hectic schedules, many children have learned to prester their parents into allowing them an array of grown-up privileges such as staying out late, drinking alcohol, piercing ears and other body parts, getting tattoos, dying hair, wearing make-up, watching inappropriate films and having sex. |

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

copywrite - (n.) 1. A variant (or solecism, if you're a purist,) of the legal term "copyright" (which means "the right to copy (or repeat) a given work," including the idea of distribution or sale); (v.) 2. Like "copyright," "copywrite" appears to have the same meaning: To secure a legal right against unauthorized misappropriation, misattribution, reproduction, distribution, transmission, or performance of your own work. [There's also a passive participle "copywritten."]

e.g., "A district court just rejected a claim alleging that briefs were copywritten. fromEdward White v. West Publishing Corp, No. 12-1340 (S.D.N.Y.)," Debra Cassens Weiss,"Cut-and-paste brief brings sanction for Lindsay Lohan’s lawyer in tossed suit over Pitbull lyric," ABA Journal website (February 25, 2013), Comment 24 (posted by "Joe," March 1, 2013).

submitted by scott m. ellsworth

loophose - Sounds a lot like loopholes: a tax break for others (say, for instance, the wealthy) that ends up hosing you and me. {Duplicate.}

e.g., Well, Sequestration Day is here, thanks in large part to congressional Republicans who refuse to consider closing even one loophose for the wealthy. What next, the dissolution of the union?

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excretorium - Rest Room, Men's, Ladies Room, etc. do not describe the function. More to the point a casual descriptor could be Peepooper but excretorium is more technically correct. {ED. And once again I notice the lack of egalitarianism or equality in the way excretoria are named. Shouldn't they be named on an equal basis, Ladies and Gentlemen (or Gents) or Men and Women? Then, too, why wouldn't possessives be used equally for both? Men's & Women's or Ladies' & Gents'? Idle mind and all that.}

e.g., May I use your excretorium?

submitted by Frank Mandriota

lip-sanc - (Rhymes with "SIP-drank"; v.) Apparently the past tense of "lip-sync." [On analogy with "drink~drank," I'd imagine.]

e.g., My 12-year-old daughter was explaining her inability to follow along with her friends in reciting affirmations. She said, "They knew it, and I didn't; so I just lib sanc."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

jury-proof - (adj.) Legal evidence so clear and obvious that not even a jury can find against it---something juries are believed to do all the time. [I found this curious little attributive in a Sherlock Holmes story written by Adrian Conan Doyle (Arthur's son) and John Dickson Carr, although it cannot recall which: it may have been "The Sealed Room" or "The Highgate Miracle," but I'm pretty sure it was "The Black Baronet."] {ED. A most enjoyable commentary. Thanks for the laugh.}

e.g., "Okay!: we have a sworn confession, two separate security tapes, one bystander's recording, two dozen witnesses, casts of the guy's shoes, his fingerprints, and his dna. I think we've got jury-proof evidence this time."  
 
"Nothing is jury proof."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

divorce welfare sysytem (dws) - A welfare system wherein ex-husbands continue to support ex-wives after a divorce.  
 
The system is privately operated and funded by the parties themselves as opposed to the public system that is operated by the government and funded through taxes. Terms are determined through a private contract called a divorce decree.  
 
Soon-to-be ex-wives simply apply at their local county courthouse by filing a claim for divorce.  
 
Benefits typically include half of the ex-husband's savings, a portion of his current earnings, the payments of the ex-wife's attorneys' fees, and custody of the couple's children.  
 
Typically, the earnings stream from the ex-husband to the ex-wife is structured as an annuity with monthly payments for spousal and/or child support.  
 
Payments may be administered through the ex-husband's employer with the aid of the local child support enforcement agency. Penalties for non-compliance are applicable.  
 
The system has met with great success. Currently, over 50% of married couples are divorced. This frees ex-wives to find boyfriends or new husbands while continuing to be supported by former husbands. Several marriages and divorces are common since claims to the system are cumulative.  
 
Spousal support benefits end when the ex-wife remarries; however, child support continues until the children turn 18.  
 
Married women are encouraged to apply from friends who are already participating in the system. Men are discouraged to marry, preferring the financial safety and security of single women.

e.g., Sarah, after years of picking-up her husband's underwear, applied to the Divorce Welfare System. With the benefits she receives, her boyfriend and her take frequent vacations. |  
 
Susie confided to her best friend, Michelle, that she was unhappy because her husband works too hard to support their vacation home. Michelle encouraged her to apply to the DWS and find someone who will be by her side always.  
 
{ED. Sounds eminently fair to me.}

submitted by HC

brokizzle - A variation of "bro."

e.g., Hey, broskizzle, c'mere.

submitted by Asia

iron law of bureaucracy - Pournelle's Iron Law of Bureaucracy:

Iron Law of Bureaucracy

In any bureaucracy, the people devoted to the benefit of the bureaucracy itself always get in control and those dedicated to the goals the bureaucracy is supposed to accomplish have less and less influence, and sometimes are eliminated entirely.

Or, restated:

. . . in any bureaucratic organization there will be two kinds of people: those who work to further the actual goals of the organization, and those who work for the organization itself. Examples in education would be teachers who work and sacrifice to teach children, vs. union representatives who work to protect any teacher, including the most incompetent. The Iron Law states that in all cases, the second type of person will always gain control of the organization and will always write the rules under which the organization functions.

e.g., Reform is impossible once the Iron Law of Bureaucracy is in effect.

submitted by [Jerry Pournelle]

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galimatias - "Confused or unintelligible talk." Ran across while looking up synonyms for poppycock. {Duplicate.}

e.g., I've had enough of your galimatias, HD. Give it a rest.

submitted by Lillith

mammothrept - "A child brought up by its grandmother; a spoiled child." {Duplicate.}

e.g., We got along just fine -- until I found out that she was a mammothrept. | "The day I apologize to you, you contumacious mammothrept, there will be two moons in the sky." (Said by erudite misopede Samuel Marchbanks, aka Robertson Davies.)

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

zedonk - Offspring of a zebra and a donkey. {Duplicate.}

e.g., Mommy, can I have a zedonk for my birfday?

submitted by HD Fowler

eleepy - Extremely sleepy.

e.g., I am eleepy -- it's time for bed.

submitted by anan91666

sculpertecture - A mixture of sculpture and architecture.

e.g., That building is an example of neo-classical sculpertecture.

submitted by Calum

sycocophony - A cacophony of sycophancy. Sucking up, or brown-nosing on a large scale. Often involving many participants.

e.g., The BBC and Tabloid coverage of the Royal wedding was a sycocophony.

submitted by calum

donedamonious - A task that required new effort to complete.

e.g., My first submission to the pseudodictionary is donedamonious.

submitted by Phil Bradley

awesomascious - Something that is way beyond the ordinary and worthy of the highest praise. Awesomacious.

e.g., Steve's artwork is awesomascious.

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pseudo - Noun: PseudoDictionary entry. An entry in the pd, whether a word or phrase or essay . . . whatever.

e.g., Hey, you should make a pseudo out of that.

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lie-ability - The measure of how well someone tells a non-truth.

e.g., No matter how good you are at telling untruths, eventually, having superior lie-ability can end up being a liability.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

dwarves trap - A spellchecker that catches dwarves as a misspelling for the plural of dwarf.

e.g., No, I'm not often injured by a dwarves trap. Once the word dwarf became politically incorrect, I've done my best to avoid it -- so I don't have much need for its plural.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

imdb - As a verb: To look up someone in the Internet Movie Data Base.

e.g., Some whippersnapper thought Kevin James belonged on a short list of the greatest comedians ever? Kevin James? Who the hell is Kevin James? I IMDbed him and found out he was the male lead in King of Queens, his main claim to fame. More recently he's made some not-so-good movies. Yeah, right. One of the greatest comedians ever. Sure he is.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

acridmonious - Describing the disgustingly pungent and bitter taste left in one's mouth after enduring a whole election caampaign filled with a constant stream of dirty character assassination, vile mud-slinging, blatant lies, cleverly distorted facts and slimy hyperbole from one candidate.

e.g., Please excuse me. I have to run to the bathroom sink and gargle my mouth out with mouthwash. I just watched a rerun of the 2012 election campaign highlights, and that pig slop is making me feel real acridmonious!

submitted by Charlie Lesko

archistract - A concept, philosophy, and classification of fine art photography that focuses on the abstract qualities of various architectural styles and subjects using monochrome or colour compositions while highlighting patterns, forms, geometry, and gradations of light and shadows. "Archistract" is a portmanteau of the words "architecture" and "abstract." It is a style of abstract and architectural photography that has recently evolved into a cohesive and functional vision combining elements and traditions found in abstract art, architecture, and photography as a whole.

e.g., This archistract is a fine example of how architecture can be photographed in an abstract way.

submitted by John Kosmopoulos - (www)

straw sound, the - The gurgling sound made when you're drinking a soda through a straw and the cup nears empty.

e.g., (HD makes the straw sound.) She: "Do you know what that means in Oklahoma? HD (from Arkansas): "No, what?" She: "It means it's empty." Fifty years later, she still has a smart mouth and gigs me whenever I give her a chance.

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plus-sized - Fat.

e.g., Chris isn't plus-sized. She's fat.

submitted by HD Fowler

skippizza - Cold leftover pizza spread with peanut butter (trust me, it's delicious).

e.g., You can take the pepperoni slices for lunch tomorrow, but I want the plain ones for skippizza.

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

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balogna-way - Describing the feeling of being very impressed with a delicatessen's selection of cold-cuts.

e.g., I couldn't believe how many different kinds of cold-cuts stocked at the corner deli. balogna-way.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

febuary - How February ought to be spelled so it wouldn't be so hard to pronounce.

e.g., Today is February 10, 2013.

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blearghy - Of a condition often caused by drinking during a celebratory evening. One wakens with a somewhat throbbing head, eyes watering, a slight lump in the throat, a mildly sour stomach, and, sometimes, a non-gravity caused heaviness, with trembling, in the outer extremities. The word also relates to symptoms from an onset of a flu-like illness, or, less severely, a malaise due to a period of personal fatigue or depression. Think having the blahs.

e.g., From Alphabets Blog: "Have not been able to view Alphabets for weeks now. Not because the internet connection isn't working or anything like that - its just that I have been feeling blearghy and in need for a change. Was almost tempted to delete everything and start anew but then thought better of it . . . after all those early alphabet days were really fun."

submitted by Machiavellean & Lesko - (www)

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soft-white - (n.) 1. a light bulb coated inside with a glaze that distributes the light produced over the whole of the interior surface as opposed to clear glass, which allows the eye-searing arc of the tungsten filament to burn itself into your cornea; 2. a day characterized by sufficient cloud cover to distribute sunlight over the whole sky: a much more pleasant, even light than the blinding, hyperphotonic torrent of multi-Geiger wavicle rounds fired at us by the neverending fusion bomb that rules the Solar system. [From GE's "soft-white light bulbs."]

e.g., I much prefer soft-white days to those days when I have to squint at my desk (the computer screen is just matchlight to lightning strike, and I can't even see it) and walk around with one of those blue after-images of the sun burned into my retinas.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

humbuggery - (noun). It's a real word and it means exactly the same thing as humbug. Humbugger.  
 
From The Free Online Dictionary » humbug:  
 
1. Something intended to deceive; a hoax or fraud. 
2. A person who claims to be other than what he or she is; an impostor. 
3. Nonsense; rubbish. 
4. Pretense; deception.  
 
As a transitive verb: To deceive or trick. As an intransitive verb: To practice deception or trickery.

e.g., The recent change to the AP Stylebook entry for illegal immigration is Orwellian humbuggery, worthy of the best glossocrats.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

political epithet -

An epithet is "a term used to characterize a person or thing." A political epithet is used for persons and things (issues, movements, etc.) related to the body politic. A political epithet is frequently "an abusive or contemptuous word or phrase." See oppithet

Nationmaster.com » Encyclopedia » Political Epithets
 
"Many political epithets are obtained by joining an otherwise neutral description of a political movement or group with a pejorative term questioning the groups's sanity or motives, or associating the group with hated political movements or leaders of the past.  
 
"Arguments about the use of these epithets often follow a pattern in which proponents of the epithets insist that the term is intended to be construed so narrowly as to be inoffensive while opponents insist that the term as heard by a typical listener will be construed more broadly. . . .
"Others claim that whatever the stated intent of the users of the term, combining a term identifying a group with a pejorative necessarily creates an association between the group and the pejorative. . . .  
 
"Regardless of intent, the possibility that political epithets will be construed more broadly than expected creates the danger of alienating a large part of one's audience. Thus, except in cases where the epithet is being used as a shibboleth to closely identify the author with a particular political movement, a cautious writer or speaker will generally adopt more neutral terminology. . . ."

e.g.,

  • Wikipedia » "Fascist (insult)": "As a political epithet, fascist was subsequently used in an anti-authoritarian sense to emphasize the common ideology of governmental suppression of individual freedom. It has also been applied to a broad range of people and groups, including people of many religious faiths, particularly fundamentalist groups. " |

  • Hot Air » Green Room » "The Eff Word": Fascism. "It's the ultimate political epithet, the atomic blast that ends calm and measured debate. This makes those who seek to be reasonable and persuasive understandably reluctant to use the word . . . and those who aren't interested in either reason or persuasion eager to hurl it at their opponents. There is nothing surprising about the visceral emotions conjured by the mention of its name. The history of fascism is written in the blood of innocents, on a scale that challenges the limits of human imagination." |

  • "'Mulungeons and Eboshins': Ethnic and Political Epithets": "Of all the mysteries surrounding the mixed-ethnic population known as Melungeons, one of the most emblematic is the mystery surrounding the origin of the word 'Melungeon.' Many possible origins for the term have been suggested by various researchers over the years, ranging from a supposed Afro-Portuguese word, 'Melungo' meaning (depending on the source) 'shipmate' or 'white person,' to the old English term 'malengine,' meaning 'cunning' or 'full of guile,' to the Arabic 'Melun-jinn,' meaning 'cursed soul.' Historically, most researchers have opted for the French term 'mélange' ('mixture') as the root of the term 'Melungeon.' . . .  
     
    "Melungeon researchers have long known that the term 'Melungeon' was used as a political epithet for East Tennessee Republicans in the years following the Civil War. In fact, Will Allen Dromgoole, the infamous author of several articles on Melungeons in the 1890s, first heard the term used by late 19th century Tennessee politicians. But from the newspaper articles cited above, we can see clearly that the term 'Melungeon' was in use as a political as well as ethnic slur well before the advent of the war." |

  • User Contributed Dictionary » "Reactionary": "Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet, generally used as a pejorative, originally applied in the context of the French Revolution to counter-revolutionaries who wished to restore the real or imagined conditions of the monarchical Ancien Régime. Through the 19th century, reactionism was used to refer to those who wished to preserve feudalism or aristocratic privilege against industrialism, republicanism, liberalism, and in some cases socialism. Later on in the early 20th century, the term also came to describe those favouring a stronger role of the Catholic Church in society." |

  • "What It Means To Be A Reactionary": "The popular depiction for the word Reactionary gives the definition -- an extreme conservative; an opponent of progress or liberalism. A more in-depth amplification is once again found in Wikipedia: Reactionary (or reactionist) is a political epithet typically applied to extreme ideological conservatism, especially that which wishes to return to a real or imagined old order of things, and which is willing to use coercive means to do so. The term is primarily used as a term of opprobrium (groups rarely identify themselves as reactionary), meant to assert the idea that the opposition is based in merely reflexive politics rather than responsive and informed views. More specifically, the term 'reactionary' is frequently used to refer to those who want to reverse (or prevent) some form of claimed 'progressive' change. (An equivalent term would be 'regressivism.' The term reaction is sometimes used as a general term for the program or philosophy of designated reactionaries.)" |

  • The Rachel Maddow Show » Friday, December 12: "That‘s a bad thing. Hoover is a political epithet in bad economic times because his response to the depression — was to, first do nothing and then do stuff that made it worse. The country needed massive federal spending to stimulate demand and keep people working. Hoover? Cut spending. The government had an economic responsibility to borrow some money and get credit moving. Hoover picked that awesome time to balance the budget." |

  • Muldrake's » "It is Time to Take America Back!": "Bush Derangement Syndrome (BDS) is a political epithet invented by former psychiatrist Charles Krauthammer to describe complaints raised against President George W. Bush and his administration, associates, affiliates, and supporters. The term especially applies to Bush haters who oppose all Bush administration initiatives solely because Bush supports [them]." |

  • Firearms Forums » Gun-Related Clubs » The 10 Ring » Rabbit Creek: "Chickenhawk (also chicken hawk and chicken-hawk) is a political epithet used in the United States to criticize a politician, bureaucrat, or commentator who strongly supports a war or other military action, yet who actively avoided military service when of age." |

  • Not that many people seem to know that Democrat Party didn't become a political epithet until 1940 or so. Before then, it was not that unusual for Democrats themselves to refer to their political party as the Democrat party, with the word party lowercased. |

  • My personal favorite political epithet is Democrat Party. |

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ringxiety - "Michael Quinion » World Wide Words Newsletter: 9 Feb 2013: "Phantom vibration syndrome is the Macquarie Dictionary Word of the Year 2012. This is a form of technological anxiety, sometimes called ringxiety (ring + anxiety) in which mobile phone users with an obsessional fear of missing incoming calls become convinced that the phone has vibrated to indicate a call when it hasn’t."

e.g., Turn off your cell phone while you're visiting, dear. I don't want it disturbing our dinner and conversation. . . . Say what? That will just exacerbate your ringxiety? Live with it, Waldo. Otherwise, I'll take you out of my will. . . . No, it's not an idle threat. It's not as if I'm your mother telling you I'll ground you for life for misbehaving. I'm your grandmother. We haven't been around each other long enough for me to bond with you to a great extent. . . . No, it's not that I don't love you. I do -- I just don't love you very much. Live with it. It would take only a stroke of the pen for me to reduce your inheritance from £75,000 to zero -- and increase your cousin Winston's by the same amount.

submitted by Lillith - (www)

applord - To show strong approval or praise of that which God has done by applauding -- that is, by clapping your hands together.

e.g., The preacher urged his flock to applord God's many miracles.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

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congrouchulations - Used when giving folks insincere good wishes when something special or pleasant happens to them.

e.g., Sure he commended me on winning the sales award, but -- you could tell by his tone that he was actually offering congrouchulations -- NOT congratulations.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

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implaqueable - Describing teeth that, no matter how poorly oral hygeine is maintained, are impervious to plaque and decay.

e.g., Despite the fact that he hardly brushes, and never flosses, Ned hasn't had a single dental issue in more than 30 years. How's that possible? Easy -- Ned's teeth are implaqueable.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

co ear ce - An action intended to force an individual to desist from, or comply with, an activity, by the pinching, twisting, or pulling on one of the two fleshy protuberances located on the opposite sides of one's head, and/or grabbing such protuberance, and yelling, loudly, into the hollow space containing one's audio input system.

e.g., Hilda: 'ey, 'arry, 'ow come ya got such 'orrible, ugly ears? Dey stick way out -- da tops are all crinkled, and if ya turned arould real quick, da lobes ud slap yer face!  
Harry: Ya, it's 'cause I was a beasty boy as a kid. Me Pops 'ud try ta co ear ce me ta be better. It dint work.  
Hilda: Aw, too bad! I'm sorry to 'ear dat.

submitted by Charlie Lesko

scaddywad - A heapin' pile, an excess, way more than necessary.

e.g., Hun, I'mo eatta scaddywad uv yer tamales when thur dun.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

groovesque - Descriptive of things modeled after or splattered with maximum groove.

e.g., Watchin' you dance to the BeeGees made me know just how groovesque you are, girl.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

groovo-graph - A visual aid tool used to describe the flavor of things groovesque and trippindicular in a rainbow display.

e.g., You don't understand your groovo-graph since you went all "wall street," do you?

submitted by steve zihlavsky

purpendicular - Opposite mellow yellow on the groovo-graph.

e.g., Man,... that was pretty mindblowing on the purpendicular side.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

ecton - The building block of ectoplasm.

e.g., "Hey, Dave, check out these ectons under the microscope at x400,000,000,000." "Pretty rancid stuff, Steve."

submitted by steve zihlavsky

men strafe - A condition that causes a husband to be especially cautious around his wife, on a monthly basis.

e.g., Joe: What's up, Barry? This is the third night in a row that you've been here at the bowling alley. Barry: I've been trying to stay away from home, for awhile. It's Sally's time of the month, and she's starting to men strafe.

submitted by Charlie Lesko

jangolapi - (Rhymes with song-guh-poppy; adj.) 1. Betting everything; 2. Putting it all on the line; 3. Going for broke; 4. "In for a penny, in for a pound"; 5. Absolutely committed; (v.) 5. Go for broke!; 6. Let it ride!; (n.) 7. A challenge to an all-or-nothing contest; 8. A 100% commitment; (interj.) 8. "All or nothing!" "Sydney or the bush!" (That last one's from Charles Schultz's Peanuts, back in ... what, 1968?).  
 
[From Jan'ya gōlāpī, which, in Bengali (of all things), means "for pink," which itself evidently derives from the phrase "racing for pinks" ... a phrase just a bit before my time, that means wagering ownership of your car (automobile title deeds are pink) on the outcome of a drag race: the winner gets the loser's car.]

e.g., "The enemy's dug in, and, man for man, we're outnumbered. What do you think? Captain Fitz?"  
"I vote attack, Colonel."  
"Noted. Major Wolton?"  
"I say go ... go."  
"Good. Master-Sergeant Dyson?"  
"Jangolapi, Sir."  
"What? Master Sergeant? What?"  
"Jangolapi ... all or nothing, Sir."  
"Oh. Oh. Okay ... Good .... Just out of curiosity---"  
"Bengali, Sir." 
 
----------------------------------  
"You can't beat me."  
"At Nintendo Duck-Hunt? Of course I can---When are you gonna stop living the lie?! I am king of the duck-hunters: il re dei cacciatori di anatre."  
"Si, si: capisco ... eh! Jangolapi."  
"Oh, you want a piece of me" "Bring it, pezzo!"  

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

sentstarters - A spoonerism derived from sentence + starters. This subspecies of severely disordered grammaticians either often or always fail to capitalize the first letters of sentences that they write. | A person who uses either the wrong punctuation in a written sentence, or in terminal cases, no punctuation at all.  
 
{ED. This entry is not a spoonerism. Look it up.}

e.g., I get so tired of having to deal with all these sentstarters whilst in the proceedings of my forays into the Internet.

submitted by Trahvagen

capzer - From Caps Lock, which is often employed by Capzers to write their horribly incorrect posts. A person who either writes everything in upper case letters, or everything in lower case letters. This is usually (but not always) a phenomenon isolated to posts/e-mails on the Internet. See entry for "sentstarters," which are a similar species of disordered grammaticians.

e.g., Intentionally or accidentally, Capzers are still either incredibly rude by yelling with all caps, or simply sloppy in their keyboarding.

submitted by Trahvagen

hypobelt - From hypocrite shortened to hypo, with "belt" tacked on in reference to the Bible Belt. This spoonerism (a combination of two or more words) is a term that is used for people who make either public or private statements saying that (insert object / action here) is alright and kosher, when that person's statement is contradictory to the philosophies or beliefs of their own religion that they profess to adhere to.  
 
{ED. This entry is not a spoonerism. Look it up.}

e.g., "Followers of the LDS religion will almost instantly see people who proclaim themselves to be LDS for the hypobelts they are if they do not seem to even know what that religion teaches, for they make statements that run counter to their religion. For example, an LDS therapist recently stated that masturbation is a perfectly righteous practice. Another example is that there are several lesbian/gay people who claim to be LDS adherents, regardless of the fact that the LDS religion preaches against homosexuality.

submitted by Trahvagen

hags - Noun, abbreviation (to be taken seriously) - Stands for "Have A Great Summer." Often used by high school students at the end of a school year while signing yearbooks. This is sometimes accompanied by the joking abbreviation BAGS, which stands for "Buy A Giraffe." (No one knows what the "S" in BAGS is supposed to stand for.) | Lower-cased, hags: gross, nasty.

e.g., This year was awesome! Take care! I'll see you next year, and be sure to HAGS! | "See that woman over there -- the one with the moles all over her face and the hair on her back? Pretty hags, isn't she? Especially with the hairs coming through the moles on her back." "Don't recognize her do you? That's Lillith, Editrix Extraordinaire for the PseudoDictionary."

submitted by Trahvagen | meredith abbott

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gingerivitus - A lively lady named Ginger.

e.g., Max introduced us to his new friend from a double date. She giggled and danced as we tried to shake hands. Max calls her Gingervitus.

submitted by Frank Mandriota

lipochondriac - A person who's so deathly afraid of gaining weight that (s)he's always at the plastic surgeon for liposuction maintenance.

e.g., Sure Mary's always looking slim. She's a lipochondriac.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

genre hacking - Breaking the rules of a given literary or artistic genre while conspicuously using the distinctive elements of that genre.

e.g., The author is genre hacking when his story uses monsters and incites fear, clearly horror, but the story is really about love and disappointment.

submitted by Asher Black - (www)

emo horror - A sub-genre of horror fiction that focuses on the horrible in unhappy emotional qualities like sadness, grief, regret, breaking, neglect, misfortune, etc. Plots resolve not so much with triumph (or its failure) over monsters or horrible people, but with resolution (or its failure) of emotional horror itself.

e.g., This story is emo horror, because it starts with sadness and ends with sadness; the monsters are optional.

submitted by Asher Black - (www)

amazgraz - An uncommon abbreviation for "Amazing Grace." Used for the well-known spiritual song, often sung at religious gatherings. It is pronounced phonetically. It has sometimes been known to be used as a sweet nickname for a female partner. Developed during the late 18th century by romance novelists of the period, the word lives on today, albeit more rarely spoken. Some claim it to have been originally conceived by the composer of "Amazing Grace," John Newton, to describe his wife, Mary Catlett.

e.g., I hear we're going to be singing "amazgraz" again this week. Man, I love that tune. | You're my amazgraz.

submitted by John Wilson

frhetoric - Used when Fred speaks or writes effectively.

e.g., That speech that Fred wrote and delivered was so terrific that I'm renaming him Frhetoric.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

lite erary - Pertaining to publications (i.e., short novels, short stories, magazine articles, etc.) that are written to briefly divert or amuse the reader, rather than educate, enlighten, engage, confront, puzzle, excite, or enrage him.

e.g., Hmmm. I've got an evening free without work from the office, Anne's at her mother's, I'm tired of watching T.V., burned out from blogging, don't want to keep slogging through Tolstoy -- just want to relax.  
 
Wonder if Kindle has anything lite erary. I'm really in the mood for "popcorn for the mind" tonight!

submitted by Charlie Lesko

avasty - (adj.) Of or pertaining to things related to (1) pirates and piracy or (2) sailing and sailing ships.

e.g., Orlando Bloom is not quite as avasty as the ... um ... other guy in Pirates of the Caribbean: um ... Johnny Depp. Who else is avasty?: Captain Hook and Mister Smee (the Hoffman/Hoskins team). But there's also Anne Bonney, Calico Jack, Edward Teach, Stede Bonnet, Edward Low of the horrible scar, and the fictional Long John Silver. All very avasty. [From "avast," a nautical term meaning "hold fast," "stop what you're doing," "belay that."]

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

knotical - (Rhymes with HOT-sickle; adj.) Of or pertaining to sailors' knots (particularly those involved in the running of so-called 'tall ships'---the sort with sails ("sheets"), belaying pins, orders to "reef" and "furl," deck swabbing, and lines of huge, unwieldy, iron cannon, port and starboard, that you load with an iron ball, black powder, and a ramrod.

e.g., Boy and Girl Scouts often spend a great deal of time on things knotical ... but I'm not certain anyone uses them, except for shoe-tying bow knots, square knots, the occasional slip knot, and nooses (some people can tie nooses, and some of them really creep me out). Think about it: I was a boy scout in the 70s, but I have never had to tie a sheepshank. I can tie a number of necktie knots, but they have nothing to do with anything particularly avasty (q.v.).

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

inemployed - Employed in household activities without any remuneration.

e.g., Geetha is inemployed at home.

submitted by J. Ajith Kumar - (www)

temperor - (n.) Someone who controls (or believes themselves to control) others through fear of (sometimes spectacular) tantrums. [Feminine "tempress"; not to be confused with "temptress," which is something else entirely.]

e.g., One of the archetypes in modern literature is the tempress dowager: the older woman who is a screeching harpy toward the younger ingenue heroine.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

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scrumpts -

Bits and pieces, leavings, scraps -- specifically, table scraps. Elsewhere, you're likely to find scrumpts defined the same as scrumptious: delicious, delectable, mouthwatering, tasty, yummy, delish, delightful, gorgeous.

If you're a word lover, do yourself a favor and subscribe to Michael Quinion's World Wide Words Newletter here.

Scraps, Via Michael Quinion at main link.

Scrumptious "I took a train trip in 1976 across the northern US," Phil Glatz remembers. "Out in the wilds of Montana, I asked the conductor, an African-American in his sixties, if there was still time to get breakfast in the dining car. He looked at his watch, shook his head, and said, 'You better hurry, or all that will be left is the scrumpts.' I’ve always remembered that term, but have not heard it since, but figure it might be related to 'scrumptious,' maybe from southern US slang." The Dictionary of American Regional English doesn't include scrumpt, but it does have scrumption, a variant form of scrimption, recorded mainly in the US South from 1834 onwards. It says it means a bit or scrap and is from an unspecified English dialect term, perhaps one of those listed in the piece. It's easy to imagine that scrumption became scrumptious and this might be the missing link between English dialect and the US scrumptious. If so, we're still left with no information how the term took on its modern meaning.

Lots of readers asked whether the term for the childhood activity of scrumping, stealing apples from an orchard or garden, was connected. It isn't. That comes from a dialect word meaning a withered apple, perhaps connected with scrimp, to be thrifty or economise, as in scrimp and save.

The Rice University Neologisms Database offers scrumpt as being a building block for both scrumptious and scrumptulescent. Heads up: Remember the warnings we give you repeatedly about being careful taking seriously what you find here? The same caution is useful for other "dictionaries" for neologisms, made-up words, and slang. Contributors at such sites are less likely to be scrupulous and scholarly than those who provide input to serious sites. We don't want to be taken seriously. {Duplicate.}

e.g., "Will you be wanting to date Letitia if I dump her." "No, I won't. I'm not interested in your scrumpts. Besides, you won't be dumping her -- she dumped you. Who do you think you're kidding?"

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

hom bray - A male politician; especially one who is a loudmouth member of the Democrat Party.

e.g., Only empty promises and words without meaning. Talk! Talk! Talk! Yak! Yak! Yak! Heehaw! Heehaw! Heehaw! It takes a real men-sshh to make a hom bray shut up!

submitted by Charlie Lesko

yestoday - An affirmation of the present, living in the moment.

e.g., Let yesterday stay in the past, and choose instead to say yestoday.

submitted by jeanine wisniewski

glammo - (n.) A woman's arsenal of dresses, shoes, earrings, nose rings, hairpins, necklaces, chokers, bracelets, anklets, flowers, perfumes, powders, liners, and blushes with which to draw the eye and please the senses. [From Glamour + Ammo (i.e., ammunition).]

e.g., "Where's the glammo list in Isaiah, again?"  
"The what?!"  
"The glammo list: you know, with the whimples and the tires? In Isaiah."  
"Whimples ... tires ... what?"  
"Oh, for goodness sake. Hand me that Bible over there, will ya?"  
"Yeah, sure ....... whimples? .... What's a whimple?"  
"Okay, yes: here it is: 'In that day the Lord will take away the bravery of their tinkling ornaments about their feet, and their cauls, and their round tires like the moon, the chains, and the bracelets, and the mufflers, the bonnets, and the ornaments of the legs, and the headbands, and the tablets, and the earrings, the rings, and nose jewels, the changeable suits of apparel, and the mantles, and the wimples, and the crisping pins, the glasses, and the fine linen, and the hoods, and the vails.' ... it's in Isaiah 3."  
"Wow ... what the hell is a crisping pin?"  
"It's a curling iron."  
"And you call that a 'glammo' list?"  
"Yeah ... shorthand. I'm trying to get it into the next edition of the New American Standard Bible."  
"Seriously?"  
"Hoping. I can hear it now: 'In that day the Lord will take away their glammo.' Sings, doesn't it?"  
"Sings. Yeah. Good luck with that."  
"Thanks."  

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

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janegimbal@yahoo.com - You have my blessings to spam this spammer.

submitted by Jane Gimbal - (www)

reciprocution - The act of retaliatorily, quid pro quo ala sadomasochismistically, or two fools acting normally shock another for the same, using a/c power under 200v or d/c power at least 12v but not exceeding 199v.

e.g., So my boss flipped the breaker while I was wiring up the security lights and threw me off the ladder, so . . . I cut the cord off the box fan that was cooling him, split and stripped it, and, with it still plugged in, shoved one end in each of his nostrils. Reciprocution at its finest.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

catfish - To develop "a fake online persona with the express purpose of deceiving a love-struck significant other." | Catfish "keep other people active in life." | Wired.co.uk: "So it came as news to me to find out that catfish were once used to keep cod that were being transported large distances in good shape. A few of these natural predators were placed in tanks along with the live cod to ensure that they stayed agile and, as a result, their flesh remained tasty."

e.g., "What were you doing on your computer just now?" "Catfishing." "Catfishing? How can you do that on a computer? Is it an online game?" "Sort of." "Catch anything?" "No, but I got a couple of nibbles." | "Was Heisman Trophy finalist Manti T'eo catfish'd?" | "This is the craziest, most amazing, unbelievable, insane story you will read today. You have to go read the entire thing for yourself, but the gist of it is that Kekua never existed and all the details of her car accident, sickness, death, and relationship with Te'o were fabricated. Te'o's family never met Kekua and Notre Dame and Te'o both insist Te'o was a victim of a sick hoax. If this is true… Wow. Catfish…"

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

gee-whoppered - To be busted, bent, or knocked out of alignment. To be caught off guard and thrown for a loop.

e.g., That whirlwind gee-whoppered me so hard that it was a minute before I knew which way was up.

submitted by Steve McDonald

thatcher's girls - Prostitutes. From Michael Quinion: "Thatcher’s girls, from northern England, briefly appeared around 1985 to mean prostitutes, applied — so it was asserted — because her policies had driven many women to the only way left open to them to earn money." Definition-Of: "British expression, coined in the 1980s, when Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher's economic policies caused such widespread unemployment that the increase in the number of prostitutes, who defiantly called themselves 'Thatchers girls,' was significant."

e.g.,

  • "I'll be back in a minute. I'm going the chat up that beauty near the end of the bar." "Have a go at her. But keep in mind that she's a Thatcher's girl." "Eh? How do you know that?" "Mmm. . . ." |

  • TheGuardian / politics » "Thatcherism hasn't failed: it has infected all our politics": "In 1982, the English Collective of Prostitutes occupied a church for 12 days in protest against 'police illegality and racism in King's Cross' the area to which many sex workers known as 'Thatcher's girls' had travelled from high unemployment areas in the Midlands and the north. Thatcher's passing is marked by street parties in Brixton, Belfast, Bristol, Derry, Glasgow and Liverpool, and seething bitterness among the mining families and communities she was allowed (including by scab union and Labour leaders) to destroy." |

  • Tom Sawyer: Comprenension Check: "The beautiful new girl was most likely a. a friend of Amy Lawrence. b. his sister Mary's friend. c. Joe Harper's sister. d. Judge Thatcher's girl." [It's a joke.] |

  • Bangor Daily News - Oct 6, 1983 » "Group begins campaign to repeal prostitution laws": "Some prostitutes, she said, are victims of cuts In welfare and are known on the street as 'Reagan's girls' in the United States and 'Thatcher's girls' in Britain." |

  • Peter Lindelauf: "Only in England could a Thatcher's girl child become PM." |

  • BBC Blogs » "How can the Libyan conflict be resolved?": "It's certainly time for the big boys [and no dought Thatcher's Girls] to wade in and appropriate whatever they can while Nu Bkue Labour and the Lib dems look on approvingly [cue good time tobury bad news, chortle; snigger, snigger;smirk, smirk]." |

  • TheyWorkForYou.com » "Orders of the Day — Sexual Offences Bill": "In the King's Cross study it was shown that there were two types of prostitutes operating: those who worked in the evening and organised by pimps, and those who worked during the day, who were basically 'freelance.' Virtually all the arrests were made during the daytime. There were some suggestions that that might show a degree of favouritism and bias by the police. Interestingly, the professional prostitutes, who had a much longer track record, referred to the new prostitutes — women who were just working one or two days a week in the afternoons — as 'Thatcher's girls', because they had been forced into prostitution by a decline in income, lost jobs, or because their social security payments had not kept up with inflation. If the hon. Member for Streatham produced a Bill that tackled the social causes, we could perhaps end prostitution, but instead we are talking about a further scale of repression." |

  • Reclaim the Night Speeches » Discussion, Chat and Gossip » slightlyspikeygirl
    I just don't think it's at all a simplistic, polarised, either/or issue: nature/nurture, biology/culture. 
     
    Men have higher testosterone; testosterone has been linked to violence, sexual aggession. That doesn't mean it's just testosterone operating — I read a theory today that boys who are violent in the classroom have particularly low cortisol levels — possibly as a result of inadequate attachment/ brutal parenting as infants — 'nurture' producing 'nature.' There's probably a complex mix of biological reasons why men are more violent — not just T.  Chicken/egg? — maybe.  But it may still be true.  
     
    And of course a complex mix of cultural reasons as well.  Women on average have better language skills — writing as a male-dominated field until the C17 for purely cultural reasons.  
     
    However, if it was purely cultural, there'd be cultures where women were dominant, more violent, politically in control.  Large-scale, there just aren't.   
     
    And the sex work industry we have now is a product of that male-dominated culture. I don't think anyone's advocating the industry as it is: people are talking about making it more equal, working for women's rights within the industry, respecting that women can and do choose to go into it, saying it's more complex than just victimisation.  
     
    --- Quote from: Kate B on Nov 27, 2007, 10:00:15 PM --- And for every woman who does choose, there are many others for whom it is quite clearly not a choice at all — it's either explicitly forced on therm or it's a matter of bald economic facts. Remember the term 'Thatcher's girls'? And what of the children? This burgeoning industry involves more and more children of both sexes. It's all but impossible to 'pick 'n' mix' in this, after all. Is some of it acceptable and some not? How do you legislate for such complexities?
    --- End quote --- 
     
    You say that the involvement of minors is illegal?  You legalise the industry? Recognise unions?  Work (obviously) for greater career choices in deprived areas? Better education? More support and protection for those who choose to work within it? Step up the fight against people-traffickers?  Protect women who have been illegally brought into the country to work in brothels?  The fact that it's complex doesn't mean you can't legislate for it. 
     
    --- Quote from: Kate B on Nov 27, 2007, 10:00:15 PM ---I know you're not implying that biology makes male aggression acceptable — I'm not suggesting that. But I do think the whole 'biological facts' theory is trotted out all too often in a way that tends to favour the status quo, rather than a push towards change.
    --- End quote --- 
     
    But that's a problem with the reception of the argument, not with the argument itself.  So there is a strong biological component? Let's take that into account when we devise social policy, not pretend it doesn't exist.
    |

  • YOGMAEL — The Unofficial George Michael Mailing List — Issue # 216: "It is kinda interesting that George, a Tony Blair fan, is getting. chummy with one of Thatcher's Girls.'" |

  • "Kings Cross As A Historic Red Light Area": "The station itself had its fame as the arrival of people coming to seek a better life in London from the rest of the country, and there's a whole mythoogy about people doing that and falling into a life of sin! Not to mention the tales of 'Thatcher's girls' coming down from the recession-hit areas of Britain to make a few bob on the game in London and by all accounts even doing so on the trains themselves!" |

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

rom-com - Film industry talk for romantic comedy. Romcom, romedy.

e.g., "Life of Pi, Ang Lee's adaptation of the Yann Martel Booker winner came in second with 11 nominations, four of them in major categories, while David O Russell's screwball rom-com Silver Linings Playbook won nominations in eight categories, seven of them major #151; with surprise nods for supporting actors Jacqui Weaver and Robert De Niro. Ben Affleck's Argo and Les Miserables, Tom Hooper's epic adaptation of the musical smash, trailed with seven."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

infringe - To infringe is to encroach on a right or privilege or to violate. See.  
 
This is a word much in the news these days -- and it will be for the foreseeable future.  

Various synonyms for infringe:
Eventually, we'll have a better idea what the word means in the Second Amendment. What it means will depend on what instance of nine black-robed justices is serving when the next big gun control case reaches the Supreme Court. It will also depend on how sweeping the upcoming gun control legislation (or Executive Order) is.

e.g., Amendment II (1791): 
A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.  
 
Example sentences from thesaurus.com:

  • It is never a good idea when you allow the government to infringe on your rights. |
  • At the same time it is prepared to infringe any or all of these in the interest of self-preservation. |
  • Don't infringe upon my right to purchase a game for entertainment because you are afraid of the impact it will have on minors.

submitted by HD Fowler

reached out to - Contacted, attempted to communicate with. Often seen as media jibber-jabber, apparently used to avoid using contact as a verb. Any prohibition against doing that is a zombie rule.  
 
Some uses are less objectionable than others, as in attempting to reconcile, for example. "Are you and Larry still estranged?" "Yes. It's been more than 10 years since we've spoken to each other. We're each too stubborn to make the first move." "That's no way for brothers to go through life." "You're right. I'll reach out to him . . . soon." "That's a copout. Set a specific deadline." "All right, no later than Sunday." . . . "Couldn't reach him -- because he died in 2007."  
 
The examples use the following meanings: Contacted; to offer someone a helping hand; to seek someone's help and support; to try to communicate and establish good relations with people; and to stretch out your arm to try to touch or hold someone or something. Only the first use bothers me more than a piddling amount.

e.g.,

  • "Midlands teacher accused of stomping on American flag in class": "We've reached out to the teacher, and we did not get a response." |

  • "Hosts Gretchen Carlson and Brian Kilmeade wanted to know if House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) or other members of the Republican leadership have reached out to Trump for advice." |

  • "We've reached out to his father who declined to be on camera. |

  • "He reached out to another alcoholic, who happened to be a physician." |

  • "The community itself also reached out to newcomers." |

  • "I'd known he existed, but had never reached out to him. With all the problems I'd suffered through, I had never reached out to God. I'd reached out to my brains, my ability to conduct legal arguments and to fight my own battles." |

  • "As Alcoholics Anonymous has reached out to include people dependent on other drugs, so has Narcotics Anonymous." |

  • "She liked the way Lois reached out to people at church. She liked what she saw as Lois worked out her faith on a day-by-day basis. And Jeanie liked the way Lois reached out to her." |

  • "His appeal reached out to the entire middle-class, both urban and rural. He gave them a sense of identity, self-respect, pride. He made them come out of their shells to stake a claim to India's politics and economy. It is an irreversible trend now." |

  • "And yet, not a single one of the major software players has reached out to seize the brass ring of what could turn out to be a sizable market." |

  • "Soft and perfect, her smile was gentle and her eyes sparkled with a happiness that reached out to Will, gladdening his heart." |

  • "'I've reached out to congressmen Charlie Rangel and Edolphus Towns,' says Giuliani, 'because the first thing for me to do is talk to elected officials — the team I'm going to need. We'll get to the more, um, informal meetings later.'" |

  • "'He fought the earlier inertia and doubt that paralyzed our party,' she praised. 'He pulled us together, reached out to all 50 states, including the smallest ones, the poor urban areas and the wealthier areas.'" |

  • "To achieve this he has reached out to the spirit of the firm's founder, Elihu Cowden Carter, the individualist lawyer incarnate." |

  • "South of the Lake, as the muck lands dried, immense cane fields, vegetable fields, and grazing lands for cattle reached out to the horizon." |

  • "Let it simply be said, Spurgeon was a man of God who reached out to people in need in the way that he saw best. He gave himself to win people to faith in Christ and also did his best to feed the poor and meet their needs." |

  • Nobody ever reached out to me the way this man did. Nobody ever called me as often or dated me as passionately as this man did. Nobody ever wrote the kind of notes this man did. Nobody ever hugged and embraced and hung onto me the. . . ." |

  • "As I began mending, most of the other recovering alcoholics who reached out to me, like most people I encountered while a practicing alcoholic, tended to withhold the criticism I needed to get better." |

  • "That is, he reached out to meet the deepest needs of those who were forlorn and thereby restored their sense of worth. The fundamental spiritual law, that in giving one receives, was evident in Job's life. He gave joy and received blessing." |

  • "But after a year, Tom married Sally Bush Johnston, whose sympathy reached out to Tom's children. Both Nancy and Sally were great influences in Abe's life. From them he received his first knowledge of the Bible, which in later years was to. . . ." |

  • "I gently placed the rubber duck on the dresser and reached out to the furry pink pig. I touched the little wind-up key in his side, and the music box slowly pinged out a few plaintive notes: 'When the bough breaks, the cradle will fall . . . down . . . will come . . . baby . . . '"

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

twatwaffle - The context of the first example is sufficient to determine that it's a substitute for idiot -- or a similar insult.

e.g., "[Rob] Parker is a jealous twatwaffle."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

awkward transition period - The time that passes when changing from one state to another -- instantaneous or step changes not being what happens all the time. For convenience, let's say the transition period can be infinitesimally small or infinitely large.

e.g., As I've grown older I've wondered more and more about the awkward transition period between life and death. Surely that's where near-death experiences occur.  
 

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

agoggery - The state of being agog -- enthralled: anxious, avid, breathless, eager, enthusiastic, excited, expectant, impatient, in suspense, on tenterhooks.

e.g., "So this week, as taxes went up for millions of Americans — which Republicans predicted throughout the campaign would happen — it was fun to watch the agoggery of the left."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

babliography - From the root words "babble" and "biography," a "babliography" is the random, babbling biography that a person creates and posts on social media sites such as Facebook in a desperate attempt to leave a mark of their passing this way, and to convince themselves and their readers that they have some relevance and significance in the world.

e.g., I have yet to find a babliography worth reading.

submitted by Kathleen Viens

smitching - Social media bitching. Smitch.

e.g., Smitch if you want to. Just remember this, especially if you're a high school student: There are consequences to smitching -- especially if you're smitching about obama and use racist terms.

submitted by [SonyaLynn ‏@SonyaLynn]

coinensadince - Coincidence. At least that's what I thought the writer had in mind. Among the worst misspellings I've ever seen -- if not the very worst. From "The Racist Tweet War Against Obama Comes to New York."

e.g., "No, it's just a coinensadince." | "What a coinensadince. " | "Is it a coinensadince that he is racist AND stupid?" | I suppose you think it's just a coinensadince that Palin is an anagram of Alpin[e]. | "Certainly not a coinensadince that they have such an ignorant outlook." | "What a coinensadince that so many of those [caught called] out are claiming to have had their Twitter accounts hacked."

submitted by Miss Speller - (www)

oya-boya! - A strong exclamation indicating surprise, pleasure, pain, or any profound reaction to something. This is a naturally developed expression from the depths of my own mind, probably derived from the shorter expression "Oy!"

e.g., Oya-boya! What a fine, big set she's got.

submitted by Steve McDonald

no wopen - An unknown phrase, found on large, portable message boards, which were unearthed in digs on historic urban 21st century sites.

e.g., Archeologists, reporting on their findings of the digs on historic 21st century urban sites, found many large, outdoor message boards containing a mysterious phrase, "No wopen." More puzzling, the message was found not only on boards in front of commercial enterprises, but on boards in front of Houses of Worship, entertainment centers, eating establishments, and various places of social gathering, as well.  
 
What were "wopen," and what was their cultural significance? Were they a material commodity -- tools, machines, or some sort of food? If so, why were they so important that their scarcity had to be advertised in so many places? And why was the supply so depleted?  
 
Or was the message a universal cry against an acronym for an unpopular public movement or a governmental project?  
 
You can bet your booties that professors in every field of the social sciences will fully devote their time and effort (they're known to be stubborn) toward the important solution of this "No wopen" enigma. Our modern world will have important new insight into the culture, society, minds, and daily social lives of our 21st century ancestors.  
 
Thank you, our esteemed professorial historians, social scientists, and psychologists, for your skills and dedication . . . and good luck!

submitted by Charlie Lesko

fool's gold words - "[F]ool's gold words make us think [something] is automatically good." That comes from Hal Lillywhite's blog. Lillywhite's essay also gave me the idea for the first example; the second example comes from the linked essay. He writes further:

I first encountered the term "Fool's Gold Words" in John Chamberlain's introduction to the 1944 American edition of Hayek's The Road to Serfdom though I do not know if the term was original with him. He applied it to concepts such as full employment, economic pump priming, the good of the whole, the greatest good for the greatest number etc. However it also fits many buzz-words today.
Chamberlain's review is also where I found the term.

e.g., Please spare me from doctors who insist on "practicing cutting edge medicine." Those are little but fool's gold words as far as I'm concerned -- especially when a doctor insists that I continue taking a "new drug" because it's more effective than tried-and-true older drugs. If the FDA suspects the new drug of having the unfortunate side effect of increasing the risk of bladder cancer (Actos) or pancreatic cancer (Byetta, Januvia, Victoza), I'll pass. If it means I have to find another doctor who will treat me a slightly less effective drug, with known side effects, so be it. | "Like witch words, fool's gold words will mislead us unless we are careful. We must learn to recognize and counteract them. Whenever a word or phrase short-circuits critical thinking we should be careful. When we recognize fool's gold words we should delve into their implications and see if there is evidence for those implications."

submitted by HD Fowler

badagi - Anything that's fat and blubbery, usually used in context of describing a person: a tease used among friends and family. The g is pronounced like a q but from the throat, basically the Arabic equivalent of qaaf.

e.g., Kyle has muscles, except they're on the bottom. Oh, you mean this bataqi stuff. *grabs hold of jiggling triceps*

submitted by rukia

virtuality - (n.) 1. The quality or state of being virtual (i.e., electronic, CG) rather than actual (i.e., physical, hardcopy, vel cet.); 2. Virtual reality: a place increasingly occupied by long-term tenants.

e.g., Oh, yes: he's conquered Asia 20 times at least! ... in virtuality. | It's become quite Platoesque: documents and drawings exist in virtuality; hardcopies are the derivatives now, mere instances of the ultimate document or drawing existing only in the 1s and 0s of computer memory.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

geekity - (n.) 1. The quality or state of being a geek; 2. The proper form of address for a greatly talented, learned, or famous geek.

e.g., "You pretend to love her---I don't know, maybe you even believe you do---but, in reality, you are simply exploiting her Velma-esque geekity so as to live untroubled in the limbo of virtuality. She's a woman, not a patch." | GEEKITY, LIKE BEAUTY, BELONGS TO THE WORLD! | "Yes, your Geekity."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

auntie bonus - A regular payment for travel -- even if you don't travel or if you stay with your aunt.

e.g., Do I also get an auntie bonus?

submitted by HD. Fowler

bedmail - (v.) 1. to blackmail someone by threatening to publish, expose, or otherwise reveal their sexual indiscretions; (n.) 2. The act of bedmailing someone; 3. The instrument of such bedmailing (e.g., note, letter, recording, video, skywriting, whatever); (adj.) 4. Of or pertaining to bedmail. [Analogy from "blackmail."]

e.g., In the Jeremy Brett/BBC Sherlock Holmes version of "The Adventure of Charles Augustus Milverton" (called in the show "the Master Blackmailer"), the focus is almost entirely on bedmail. | How much bedmail does James Bond carelessly leave behind him in his mad race to ensure that half of the next generation look like him?

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

orchidia - The condition of male emotional disturbance thought to be centered in the testicles (Greek "orches"). Comparable to female "hysteria."

e.g., That nutty Bob is out of control today! He's *absolutely orchiderical.

submitted by Mark Lee - (www)

-

submitted by

rkba - Right to Keep and Bear Arms.

e.g., "We in the RKBA community have spent countless hours and dollars attempting to educate the Hoplophobes. This is hopeless. It cannot be done. These poor folks have a condition known to the medical specialty of neurology as "anosognosia." That is: they don't know, and they don't know that they don't know. A sure sign of such a deplorable condition is that when education is attempted, the Hoplophobe responds with anger."

submitted by [Dr. Bill Rogers] - (www)

champagne socialist - A political term I ran across today that really intrigued me. Essentially the same as a limo|limousine liberal in the United States.  
 
Similar terms: Chardonnay Socialist, Bourgeois Bohemian, Gauche Caviar, Gucci Socialist, Salon Bolshevik. Related: East Coast Liberal, Hollywood Left, Jewish Left, Liberal Elite, Radical Chic, West Coast Liberal.  
 

  1. Wikipedia: "Champagne socialist is a pejorative political term originating in the United Kingdom. The phrase is used to describe self-identified socialists whose comfortable upper middle class lifestyles are perceived to be incompatible with their professed political convictions. The term is used by opposing politicians to portray and ridicule their opponents as hypocritical. . . . The label arose from the perceived activity of proposing toasts to famous socialists with champagne. . . . Comparable terms are limousine liberal and gauche caviar." |

  2. Wiktionary: "(pejorative) A person who claims to adhere to socialist ideology but does not act appropriately." |

  3. Collins English Dictionary: "a professed socialist who enjoys an extravagant lifestyle." |

  4. Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary: "a rich person who says he or she supports a fair society in which everyone has equal rights and the rich help the poor, but who may not behave in this way"|

  5. Oxford (British & World English): "British derogatory a person who espouses socialist ideals while enjoying a wealthy and luxurious lifestyle." |

  6. Macmillan Dictionary: "someone with left-wing political opinions who is very rich. This word is often used to show that you dislike people like this." |

  7. The new Partridge dictionary of slang and unconventional English: "a person attached to socialist politics who enjoys a luxurious lifestyle UK 1987" |

  8. Conservapedia: "A champagne socialist is someone who, while possessed of great riches, supports socialist policies which have the aim of denying prosperity to other members of the community. These hypocrites, common in the British Labour Party and elsewhere, are similar to . The term "champagne socialist" derives from a combination of "socialist" and "champagne," and expensive, bubbly wine typically enjoyed by the rich." |

  9. Red State » "Barack Obama — The Ultimate Champagne Socialist": " It's very sad that these Champagne Socialist have gotten control of a once great Democrat Party, but their small d voters are missing the train on who’s really running it. The concept of Liberal, Limousine Liberal, left, far left, leftist and even radical leftist don’t seem to have any teeth, maybe Champagne Socialist will — it, along with Gauche Caviar and Salon Bolshevik in Europe have helped to define the leftist ne’er-do-wells there as the hypocrites they are." |

  10. "What's a champagne socialist, can you give me a definition please?": "Someone who purports to empathise with the lower class whilst enjoying an upper class lifestyle. [List of Examples] . . . All of them mainstays of the socialist belief of those who have giving to those who don't — on condition it's not them doing the giving." |

  11. Urban Dictionary: "A champagne socialist is a derogatory label for a person who vocally and ideologically expresses support for democratic or radical socialist beliefs, but lives a lifestyle that contradicts these values.  
     
    "Wealthy politicians, celebrities, academics, entrepeneurs, and the refined urban middle-class are often accused of being champagne socialists.  
     
    "Variations of this British term include 'Limousine Liberal' in the USA, 'Chardonnay Socialist' in Australia and New Zealand, 'Gauche Caviar' in France, and the more obscure 'Salon Bolshevik.'  
     
    "John Smith is a champagne socialist — he moans continually about capitalist greed, but have you seen the size of his house?"

e.g.,

  1. The Telegraph » "Valérie Trierweiler 'succumbs to Marie-Antoinette syndrome of life of luxury'": "President François Hollande's 47-year old partner was slammed for eschewing her Left-wing principles in favour of unabashed champagne Socialism despite the threat of 'thousands of job losses in the coming weeks' in companies ranging from Renault to Air France." |

  2. The Daily Mail » "'Champagne socialist' François Hollande under fire as he makes his first trip as French president...in a £12,000-an-hour private jet": "The left-wing leader — who has promised massive tax hikes for the rich — was whisked into Paris in the luxurious Falcon 900 aircraft within hours of winning the election on Sunday night." |

  3. Wikipedia Talk: "Champagne Socialists may claim to be against the capitalist system but will still happily function in it. Well they don't have much choice, do they? If the system IS a capitalist one, what are they supposed to do? Refuse to work and sit in a tent for 30 years waiting for capitalism to collapse? What about people in communist countries who don't particularly agree with their system but still happily function in it? What childish term would you apply to them? Pathetic." |

  4. "Who do you find more annoying: Champagne Socialists or hard-nosed Tories?": "Do you find middle/class upper class socialists who live the life they criticise the most or Tories who constantly say to 'take responsibility' and say no one deserves help or hand-outs the most annoying?" Genocidal: "Champagne socialists by far. Hard-nosed Tories are simply who we expect them to be, whereas the champagne socialist is a hypocrite." |

  5. "Political Death of a Champagne Socialist": "No doubt Kevin MacDonald would find Dr. Strauss-Kahn a case worthy of his attention, but, that aside, the picture that emerges here is clearly that of a typical 'champagne socialist': a globalist, former communist, who nevertheless stays in luxury hotels; rubs shoulders with powerful industrialists, billionaires, and heads of state; and lives a fabulously privileged and rarefied lifestyle, out of the public purse —: a suave, elegant, smooth-talking philanderer, aligned with a political party whose policy is to take from the talented and hard-working in order to give to the talentless and the indolent, who all the same draws a six-figure [$500,000] salary (plus an opaque pension scheme), in a nearly all-powerful position obtained through presidential favour." |

  6. The Telegraph » "A champagne socialist reports from the Bahamas": "Nor will I be intimidated by being called a 'champagne socialist.' Both parts of the term are totally apt: I will guzzle as much of the fizzy stuff as I can get my mitts on, not that that is very much. Nor is my socialism the kind which would plough up the vines of Troyes and Épernay to build a socking great power station. I’d want a goodly supply for me and my fellow commissars curses curses wot am I saing?" |

  7. The Guardian » 8th December 2001: "They forgot to ask whether I have communist sympathies, or perhaps they don't care anymore. And after today I can olny ever be described as a champagne socialist anyway." |

  8. Ashfield nationalist » "Bob Crow the Champagne Socialist": "It is reported in the Daily Mail today that RMT Union leader Bob crow spent £650 for a meal at the exclusive restaurant Scott's in Mayfair, London.  
     
    Now it is not for hardworking Nationalists to tell anyone how they should be spending their money, but as Mr Crow is one of this country's leading militant socialist trade unionists, surely he should be setting an example of frugal restraint in these hard times. Especially when you consider the fact that the amount spent on one meal by Bob Crow cost more than most RMT members earn in a week." |

  9. The Daily Mail » "Lording it at Lord's: Bob Crow does little to lose his champagne socialist image as he joins peer in Veuve Clicquot bar at cricket": "His attendance at the champagne bar will only increase his reputation as a champagne socialist.  
     
    "Despite once being a card-carrying member of the Communist Party and who still describes himself as a 'communist-stroke-socialist', Mr Crow does appear to enjoy the finer things in life.  
     
    "Although quick to point out that he still lives in a council house in North-East London, the union boss holidays on cruises around Barbados with his long-term partner.  
     
    "He is also fond of dining at exclusive restaurants like Scotts, in Mayfair, London and Rules, in Covent Garden, London.  
     
    "Mr Crow recently came under fire for running up a ʊ650 bill at Scott's restaurant in Mayfair." |

  10. Digital Spy Forum » "Champagne Socialists" » makara80: "Sadly Gorgeous George™ [Galloway] has adopted the blueprint for your typical Champagne Socialist: Do as I say, not as I do. Also, George, like the rest, feels that by simply stating that he cares about stuff, is good enough. It isn't. It may be a cliche but George talks the talk but doesn't walk the walk (he doesn't need to walk the walk with a Merc anyway!)" |

  11. Bridport Radio » "Champagne Socialist or Working Class Hero?": "Anonymous, vitriolic letters have been sent to Billy Braggs neighbours in Burton Bradstock calling him the 'Village Idiot' and accusing him of being a hypocrite for living a celebrity lifestyle despite his socialist views.  
     
    "Bragg has frequently come under attack for his outspoken views, what do you think? Champagne Socialist or Working Class Hero? Please leave a comment below." |

  12. Dioclese » "93 Men in a Boat (4): The Champagne Socialist": "As my regular reader will confirm, there's nothing I hate more in life than a bloody hypocrite — and the worst sort of hypocrite is the champagne socialist. You know. Bastards like Blair for example....  
     
    "Anyway, I will not embarrass myself or you by telling you how much this latest trip cost us, but it does not take a genius to work out that 5 weeks in a boat cruising the South Pacific doesn't exactly come cheap! I don't think there were any poor people on board unless, of course, you count the crew and the expedition team.  
     
    "While we were on a coach trip around Tahiti, we had an English guide who was married to one of the locals. At one point, she asked how things were going back home. "One idiot immediately yelled out 'We've got a bloody Tory government now that wants to put 490,000 of us out of work.' My response was 'That's about two million too few, chum.'  
     
    Turns out that this paragon of the Socialist State works in local government, so might might ask how the fuck he can afford this trip in the first place on the back of the taxpayers' money?" |

  13. The Sun » "Pink champagne socialist: "ALAN Johnson shows he really is a champagne socialist — caught quaffing pink bubbly as the VAT rise hit Britain yesterday. " |

  14. The Daily Mail » "The Tories and the champagne socialist": "Neither would have dreamed of seeking inspiration from a champagne socialist who oozes hatred for the middle classes and pays expensively for her child's schooling while denouncing selection for everyone else." |

  15. The Brussels Journal: The Voice of Conservatism in Europe » "Champagne Socialist": "A quote from The Daily Telegraph, 18 January 2007  
     
    'Segolene Royal, the doyenne of the French left, suffered an embarrassing blow to her image as a presidential candidate yesterday when she was accused of tax dodging. Faced with taunts about being a gauche caviar, the Gallic equivalent of a champagne socialist, she denied being rich, instead claiming that she was just 'well-off.' Not only does she have part ownership in three impressive homes with her boyfriend, the Socialist Party chairman François Hollande, but the two have set up a real estate company to manage the properties. This has enabled them to reduce the amount that they pay in l’impot de solidarité sur la fortune, or ISF, a high tax imposed on anyone with assets of more than $985,000.'" |

  16. Casey Pops » "Is President Obama a Champagne Socialist? ": "The sad reality is that the Obamas probably don't even consider that their lavish vacation trips cost middle class taxpayers more than they could ever afford for themselves, even for a once in a lifetime vacation. It's another example of what Europeans call 'champagne socialists' — the rich leftist/socialists who take up political careers in the effort to tax everyone (but themselves) in order to flatten the income differences created by a market economy, by 'robbing' the rich to 'give' to the poor. But few are the champagne socialists who actually give up their lavish lifestyles by giving their money directly to the needy. They prefer to keep their own wealth and, instead, redistribute middle class tax payments and benefit concert proceeds. President Obama is no different. His favorite haunts, besides golf courses — it has been reported that he has played more rounds of golf than any other President — are New York City and Hollywood, where he mingles with other champagne socialists and touches them up for campaign contributions. The contributions roll in because his donors hope to keep their tax niches intact. Obama's Hawaii vacations are just the tip of the iceberg." |

  17. "Philosophy Forums » Philosophy of Politics and Law » Champagne Socialism — Is it hypocritical?": "MilesSmiles: 'The Champagne Socialist is wealthy, and has done very well for himself in the free market, but he believes that the state ought to do more to redistribute income to the poor. He dabbles in charity, and does do some good with his riches, but he still lives much more comfortably than others. It seems to follow that if he believes that his money ought to be distributed fairly amongst the poor, that he give a large amount of his money away to charity, and live in material conditions that are similar to the rest of the population.  
     
    This seems an unfair ask of somebody who has just been unduly lucky in life, and we rarely hear stories of people doing this. But should the fact that they do not be held against our upper class socialists?'  
     
    "MarchHare: 'My experience of UK politics is that the people who want to redistribute wealth mean 'Everyone's wealth except my own.' Hence the cut-off point of 100% income taxation in people's hypothetical tax regimes varies as they move up the income ladder. For example, I have heard that a former Labour party leader, Neil Kinnock, once proposed that no-one should earn more than £1 million. I doubt that he has those views now that he has earnt susbtantially more than that. . . .  
     
    "'Obviously there is a difference between giving one's own wealth to charities and believing that the money of others should be taken to pay for the state. Many believe the former and not the latter, but a 'champagne socialist' seems to be someone who believes the latter and not the former.  
     
    "'Such hypocrisy does not invalidate their opinions, but it does suggest that they have not thought beyond 'stage one.' This is sadly very common: it's easy to take a view on some policy, like the redistribution of income, by only thinking of in terms of the aims of the policy. It is only when one moves on to further stages, which deal with the actual consequences of the policy, that people can realise these kinds of hypocrisies.  
     
    "'For instance, once the principle of redistribution of income has been established, why stop at the very wealthy? Why not redistribute the income of the middle classes and give it to the poor? If politicians can redistribute the wealth for a variety of reasons, will they then redistribute with an eye towards winning votes rather than ending inequality? What effects on incentives would there be? If there are to be varied but more equal incomes, where will the cut-offs be? What about those jobs which are politically unpopular but economically necessary? What about those jobs that are unpleasant but for which workers get compensated with higher wages? How far will politicians go to redistribute their own incomes? Will payment-in-kind and institutional privileges mean that equality of income fails to result in equality of wealth and in fact encourage 'black-market' accumulation of wealth in this way and others? And so on. . . .  
     
    "'The general moral of the champagne socialist is that we should not stop at'stage one' when we are considering policies. As adult members of free societies, there is a social responsibility to consider the broader consequences of policies and not just what they are ostensibly supposed to achieve.'" {ED. Three interesting pages.} |

  18. The Blaze » "Champagne Socialist? Hollande Boards Private Jet Hours After Winning French Election, Despite Promises to Take Trains Like the Common Man": "This, critics say, from the man who supports a 75% income tax on the rich. Why should they sacrifice the majority of their income to the state, they ask, so a hypocritical president can live in luxury? It would be different if he were not so harsh on the rich, but his personal lifestyle and political beliefs are seemingly already at odds.  
     
    "Facing charges of being a 'champagne socialist' just days into his [François Hollande] term [because of traveling by private jet at a cost of £12,000 per hour], international critics are saying this exemplifies why socialism has yet to succeed. While proponents of the ideology maintain it has never been implemented properly, others argue that, unless you change human nature, it can't be implemented properly. There are just too many people who will take off in a private jet at their constituents’ expense — even if they have just spent months promising to ameliorate the debt and reform the 'bling, bling' presidency they succeed." |

  19. Evening Standard » "Socialist Hollande owns three homes on the Riviera": "France's new Socialist president owns three holiday homes in the Riviera resort of Cannes, it emerged today.  
     
    "François Hollande, 57, who 'dislikes the rich' and wants to revolutionise his country with high taxes and an onslaught against bankers, is in fact hugely wealthy himself.  
     
    "His assets were published today in the Official Journal, the gazette which contains verified information about France’s government.  
     
    "To the undoubted embarrassment of the most Left-wing leader in Europe, and a man who styles himself as “Mr Normal”, they are valued at almost £1 million.  
     
    "It will also reinforce accusations that Hollande is a 'gauche caviar,' or 'Left-wing caviar' — the Gallic equivalent of a champagne Socialist." |

  20. "Are Champagne Socialist the biggest hypocrites imaginable?": "They pons around with their limp wrists, reading the Guardian, telling anyone that will listen how deeply they care about humanity, wearing their leftwing beliefs as a fashion statement, yet if there was ever a chance of a real Socialist government gaining power in the UK, they'd flee the country, taking all their wealth with them quicker than you could say 'pinko tosser.'" |

  21. The Telegraph » "India's champagne socialist": "Mr Aiyar is what in England might — rather rudely and possibly unfairly — be described as a 'champagne socialist.'" |

  22. The Independent » "Prescott, the Beck's beer socialist": "John Prescott, Labour's deputy leader, last night lodged an official complaint against photographs of himself being doctored to make him look like a 'champagne socialist.'  
     
    "The true picture of Mr Prescott and his wife Pauline at a party showed that there were bottles of Becks beer on their table, not champagne bottles.  
     
    "But in the photograph that appeared in the London Evening Standard, one bottle of beer by Mr Prescott's hand had been airbrushed out of the picture. Another had been cropped so that it appeared to be the neck of a champagne bottle.  
     
    "'However harmless this may seem, I believe it is disgraceful and unacceptable that a newspaper should doctor pictures in this way,' Mr Prescott said.  
     
    "Airbrushing was often used by newspapers in the former Soviet Union to remove Soviet leaders who were no longer in favour in the Politburo. But it is probably the first time a beer bottle has been removed this way.  
     
    "It came after the press seized on Mr Prescott's comments last week that he was 'middle class' because he earned pounds 34,000 as an MP. Under the headline 'Aye lad, I'm right middle class, me,' the Standard said Mr Prescott had handed Tony Blair's New Labour the ultimate endorsement by admitting he was middle class.  
     
    "Beneath the photograph, showing Mr Prescott in a dinner jacket, was a caption saying 'champagne socialist.'  
     
    "He took the unusual step of issuing a statement to demand a full apology for the slip up over the beer as part of Labour's 'rebuttal' policy in the run-up to the general election. He said: 'The standards of the Tory press in the run-up to the election are bound to be an issue if this kind of thing goes on and we intend to draw attention to such malpractice at every turn.'" |

  23. No Champagne Socialist Lyrics: "Let the record show
    It's 1964, in the city of New York
    And take the train to Queens
    And meet a Jewish family 
     
    He's the youngest one of three
    And his brothers have left home
    And he's on the same road
    Just credits shy of a diploma

    But he wants to represent
    The struggling with rent
    But he can't live on both sides of the fence
    So he continues to insist that he's no champagne socialist 
     
    And he's not coming back
    After studying the facts
    He knows of all the problems of the past 
     
    But he's quick to concede
    That in order to proceed
    We can't just keep on preaching what we need 
     
    To become a working man
    Is to live and work with them
    And this is something you can't pretend
    So he continues to insist that he's no champagne socialist 
     
    (That he's no champagne socialist)
    (He's no champagne socialist)"

submitted by HD Fowler

anglotard - A stupid or uneducated English man. Behaving in a manner suggesting both stupidity and English origin.  
 
(ED. By extension and in general, "_____tard" for a stupid, uneducated, or otherwise intellectually deficient person of any nationality -- making future "tard" references not only unnecessary but also redundant. There will have to be something "special" for any such submittals to be accepted from now on. We''ll go that far in acquiescing to political correctness and being sensitive to the feelings of the innocent, but probably not much further. After all, funny is funny, even if someone's feelings get hurt sometimes.)

e.g., The English countryside is littered with offensive anglotards. The deal was soured by his incessant anglotard rants.

submitted by Timothy Peach - (www)

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submitted by

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watchbird - A military droid, soon used for domestic law enforcement, as imagined by Robert Scheckley in his 1953 short story of the same title. Sheckley's tale (set in 2003) of technology gone wrong can be read in its entirety at the link provided. {Duplicate.}  
 
"'Watchbird' postulates a scenario where scientists, working for a private sector corporation, have perfected a technique to invade the human mind (in essence to become telepathic) to such an intimate degree that the computer-programmed, miniaturized components the corporation can produce to literally read our very thoughts are narrowed to such a fine-tuned degree that they are able to determine when anyone is about to commit murder (can human thought be reduced to bits and bytes?). The military (with the approval of congress) gets hold of the device and installs it in drone-like 'watchbirds' that scour the skies and are equipped with the capability to neutralize any potential murderer with what Sheckley calls 'electrical immobilizers' (think powerful tasers from the skies). First, there is one watchbird, who [who?] tests successfully. Before long, the skies are filled with thousands of them . . . and then something goes horribly wrong. Sheckley's story not only adds a What if? reductio ad absurdum twist to the 'Big Brother Is Watching' theme so chillingly portrayed by George Orwell's 1984, but takes it another frightening step and in a different direction that is perhaps more relevant today than ever before. 'Watchbird' is a quintessential example of the cautionary SF story."  
 
What do watchbirds watch? They watch you.  
 
Then there are the less lethal (but still troubling?) watchbirds of "children's book author and illustrator Munro Leaf." "The Watchbirds may be a bit Big Brother for 2011 (they are particularly intimidating when found on adult-targeted brochures, like the one Leaf decorated for the Better Citizens Booth of the League of Women Voters), but Leaf's captions and absurdist drawings soften the nagging. And if you're interested in other ways Leaf endeavored to humorously indoctrinate children into good behavior, you might enjoy. . . ."

e.g., "This etext was produced from Galaxy Science Fiction February 1953. Extensive research did not uncover any evidence that the U.S. copyright on this publication was renewed. Minor spelling and typographical errors have been corrected without note."  
 

Gelsen entered, he saw that the rest of the watchbird manufacturers were already present. There were six of them, not counting himself, and the room was blue with expensive cigar smoke.

"Hi, Charlie," one of them called as he came in.

The rest broke off conversation long enough to wave a casual greeting at him. As a watchbird manufacturer, he was a member manufacturer of salvation, he reminded himself wryly. Very exclusive. You must have a certified government contract if you want to save the human race.

"The government representative isn't here yet," one of the men told him. "He's due any minute."

"We're getting the green light," another said.

"Fine." Gelsen found a chair near the door and looked around the room. It was like a convention, or a Boy Scout rally. The six men made up for their lack of numbers by sheer volume. The president of Southern Consolidated was talking at the top of his lungs about watchbird's enormous durability. The two presidents he was talking at were grinning, nodding, one trying to interrupt with the results of a test he had run on watchbird's resourcefulness, the other talking about the new recharging apparatus.

The other three men were in their own little group, delivering what sounded like a panegyric to watchbird.

Gelsen noticed that all of them stood straight and tall, like the saviors they felt they were. He didn't find it funny. Up to a few days ago he had felt that way himself. He had considered himself a pot-bellied, slightly balding saint. . . .

Thousands of watchbirds, trying to stop countless millions of murders — a hopeless task. But the watchbirds didn't hope. Without consciousness, they experienced no sense of accomplishment, no fear of failure. Patiently they went about their jobs, obeying each stimulus as it came.

They couldn't be everywhere at the same time, but it wasn't necessary to be. People learned quickly what the watchbirds didn't like and refrained from doing it. It just wasn't safe. With their high speed and superfast senses, the watchbirds got around quickly.

And now they meant business. In their original directives there had been a provision made for killing a murderer, if all other means failed.

Why spare a murderer?

|

"Despite being published in mainstream magazines like Playboy (which, in the past, took its fiction very seriously), Sheckley has usually been relegated to the genre ghetto, even if at an exalted level, and, yes, new readers will find, on occasion, genre tropes and clichés that will tempt a dismissal. Characters are mostly just moving parts in the idea machine, distinguished solely by rudimentary emotions (eagerness, trepidation, fear), and at this point in your reading life, you may not savor overripe expressions like 'the cauldrons in which wars were brewed,' or need to be informed, as when a watchbird inexplicably appears to thwart an execution, that 'Prisons are large and strong, with many locked doors.' But banalities like these occur rarely, and as the reader progresses through the riotous absurdities, stunning moments of pathos, and some of the most compassionate tales of lost innocents (and innocence) to be found in science fiction, any complaints become merely quibbles. There's a thrilling cumulative effect as the worlds continue to deepen and elements cohere more seamlessly, and by the time we get to the superb final stories, terribly funny and moving tales of loneliness and desire, you can understand why Sheckley has often been compared to Voltaire."

 

 

Wednesday, September 22, 2010

The Watchbird

When I was a little boy in the forties, the cartoon "The Watchbird" appeared in The Ladies Home Journal, a magazine to which my mother subscribed. The cartoon always featured a bad boy being observed by the Watchbird. The cartoonist would draw and describe the naughty, or whiney, or stingy bad boy being surveilled by the Watchbird, drawn in profile, the boy caught in the sinful act, and then the clincher would come. "This is the Watchbird watching a Sneaky." Named and shamed by his sin. A second bird would be drawn, facing the young reader. The heading read, "This is the Watchbird watching YOU!" Pediatric ethics 101 at the foot of The Ladies Home Journal.

What was always most interesting was the naughty activity, which provided the young reader a certain vicarious pleasure. The Watchbird was a simple line-drawn, fat little cartoon bird, peering at the offender and then at me. The assumption that we all bore close scrutiny at six or eight for our dirty little secrets was never really challenged in those days. My mother told me she occasionally spanked me with the hairbrush for no definable reason other than the gut feeling that I deserved it. She was probably right. She was a stay at home mum and probably knew far more than the Watchbird.

I don't think the cartoon had any lasting ethical benefit because even in those days, naughty was more interesting to watch than goody-two shoes. I guess it wasn't the enlightened child raising that we see today, but there was never a feeling that I was short changed in the love game. We are still under scrutiny today by Watchbirds of a different name.

Posted by jim at 2010-09-22 7:44 PM

submitted by [Robert Sheckley] - (www)

michele simplification - After struggling to remember how to spel parallel while I was in a near stupor earlier today, it occurred to me that we should just quit doubling l's in words. Make it paralel. Make it paralelogram. Make it -- anything but a word speled with double l's. Hel, at one point I managed to type in paralllel.  
 
Since Microsoft Outlook didn't flag parallell. as a possible speling error, I wonder if it's an acceptable alternative speling.

e.g., Why the l don't you just start using the Michele Simplification -- never use doubled l's when you spel a word. | I used the Michele Simplification when we came up with my daughter's middle name. Not only did it require one less letter to spel, it looked better with her given name and her surname. Thought went into not just the name selection for her, but into what speling to use. | Now that my daughter is married and using the same surname as her husband, it might be that speling her middle name with two l's would look better. She's over eighteen, so the choice hers. Given that she's always loved her name, including the speling, I doubt that she'l be making a change.

submitted by HD Fowler

lesnerize - "It represents the ultimate fear of not knowing what it is you need to avoid doing. Well, I'm pretty confident that, whatever the cultural differences between me and the Korean administration and clientele at my new school, I'm not lesnerizing."  
 
Typical Sheckley stories include "Bad Medicine" (in which a man is mistakenly treated by a psychotherapy machine intended for Martians), "Protection" (whose protagonist is warned of deadly danger unless he avoids the common activity of "lesnerizing," a word whose meaning is not explained), and "The Accountant" (in which a family of wizards learns that their son has been taken from them by a more sinister trade -- accountancy). {Duplicate.}

e.g.,

"Whatever you do, don't Lesnerize!" |

"The trouble is, I don't have any idea what lesnerizing might be. A common human action, the derg had said. Well, for the time, I'm avoiding as many actions as possible.

"I've caught up on some back sleep and nothing happened, so that's not lesnerizing. I went out and bought food, paid for it, cooked it, ate it. That wasn't lesnerizing. I wrote this report. That wasn't lesnerizing.

"I'll come out of this yet.

"I'm going to catch a nap. I think I have a cold coming on. Now I have to sneez

"The End

"© 1956 by Robert Sheckley. First published in Galaxy, April 1956." |

"Well, that was an odd one. It made me think about some of the ridiculous warning labels you sometimes see. Am I to take it from the ending that lesnerizing is the same thing as sneezing?" |

"I have this peculiar fear of doing something I shouldn't be doing -- could I be lesnerizing?" "No. It's just that you're married now. Such fear is normal for a newly married man." |

"The protagonist of 'Protection' is reassured that he is safe, unless of course he dares to lesnerize, but no one will tell him what that constitutes. Here is a theme that resonates in the sf community, rich as it is in socially challenged types who never know when they'll be punished for violating unspoken rules everyone else is aware of. I myself often fear that I am about to lesnerize, or have already done so. (Another sf treatment of this theme appears in Greg Egan's Distress, whose narrator finds himself in the Kafkaesque position of being kicked out of a Relationship for two crimes, the second of which is ignorance of the first.)" |

"Contact with the derg has also opened the narrator up to other dangers. There’s the gamper, the grailers, the feegs, the leeps, which can be warded off with things like mistletoe and graveyard mold and keeping the closet door closed, but and worst of all, the thrang, which can only be eliminated if the narrator does not lesnerize. Problem is, the thrang gets the derg before it can define lesnerize, so the narrator is left alone, his actions reduced to eating and sleeping, afraid that anything more ambitious might cause his doom. It's all great fun, but it's the derg's sigh that elevates 'Protection' to something approaching tragedy; Sheckley's is a universe when even dergs are slaves to their nature and weary from the inexplicable rules of existence. A friend I showed this story to got it exactly backwards when he said, "It's good, but he’s no Douglas Adams.'" |

There'll be an airplane crash in Burma next week, but it shouldn't affect me here in New York. And the feegs certainly can't harm me. Not with all my closet doors closed.

No, the big problem is lesnerizing. I must not lesnerize. Absolutely not. As you can imagine, that hampers me.

And to top it all, I think I'm catching a really nasty cold.

The whole thing started on the evening of November seventh. I was walking down Broadway on my way to Baker's Cafeteria. On my lips was a faint smile, due to having passed a tough physics exam earlier in the day. In my pocket, jingling faintly, were five coins, three keys, and a book of matches.

Just to complete the picture, let me add that the wind was from the northwest at five miles an hour, Venus was in the ascendancy and the moon was decidedly gibbous. You can draw your own conclusions from this.

I reached the corner of 98th Street and began to cross. As I stepped off the curb, someone yelled at me, "The truck! Watch the truck!"

I jumped back, looking around wildly. There was nothing in sight. Then, a full second later, a truck cut around the corner on two wheels, ran through the red light and roared up Broadway. Without the warning, I would have been hit. |

"I couldn't really tell you what the talk was about. After all, I was pretty high, and I've never bothered to master a lot of the standard human concepts. Roughly speaking, it seemed like Jack thought he could prove that every possible universe exists. Considering my background, you'd think I'd be interested in what he might have to say on this topic . . . but you'd be wrong. I just wanted to lesnerize a couple of people and get the hell back to the Pure Land. . . . I couldn't stop myself from shlubbering out, 'I want to lesnerize you.' Why did I have to go and tip my hand like that, a part of my mind wondered bleakly. Helen had jumped to her feet, and when I slid to the floor I could see her shiny black underwear. It took the full force of my will to keep from beginning to rave in the mother tongue. . . . A 'Venusian's' mission on Earth is to reproduce by lesnerization, and then return to the Pure Land. Once enough of us have done this, there will be a web of consciousness connecting our universe and yours, and we will be able to draw the two closer together so that even the weak and diseased members of our race can move freely between 'Venus' and the Earth. Several members of my swarm have completed successful missions, and they have described to me in detail what it is like to have the sort of multiple trans-universal consciousness which Jack and Helen were puzzling out. . . . 'I can't believe this,' Jack said desperately. He ripped the top off another beer from the icebox. He'd left his first one by the werble, and he was scared to get close to me. He sat down on the kitchen chair. 'I'll watch,' he said shakily, 'But I'm not going to let you lesnerize us.' . . . I should have taken them then and there . . . but lesnerization goes a lot smoother if the human hosts are completely willing. It's a simple operation. You just run a pseudopod up the person's nose, suck out their brain, and fill their head up with part of your bodymass. Over the next year, your offspring slowly absorbs all of the host body, learning how to model it in the process. It's the way we've always reproduced on Earth. When we fission like this, we have to split off two buds . . . baby 'Venusians' . . . so we always have to lesnerize two people at once." |

"Neither of you must lesnerize for at least the first ten years of your relationship, starting form you first date; If either of you do, it will end badly in an incident involving cheese and some kind of transportation device." |

"Either way, do practice safe sex, and lesnerise at least once a day." |

"This monstah is known as a 'feeg.' It appears in a story by Robert Sheckley called 'Protection.' In the story a man sells his soul to the Devil who says he cannot collect unless the man 'lesnerizes,' but the Devil never tells the man what 'lesnerizing' is. Turns out that 'lesnerizing' is, uh, sneezing. In the story the feegs are what lurks in the closet which is why you have to keep the closet doors closed at all times." |

Lesnerizing is much less common in science fiction and fantasy, than everyday life. While some characters have adverse reactions to magic, truth drugs, or dishwashing detergent with lemon, most characters never seem to suffer from food allergies, allergies to cats or wool or other animals or animal fibers, or exposure to poison ivy or other often-adverse-reaction-causing plants. When writers include allergies, why are they doing it -- how much of it is to make the character seem more 'real,' how much is for some particular plot effect in the story, where the character's sneezing is important, or the wizard melts away with a bucket of detergent dumped on him? Do readers appreciate it, not appreciate it, or not care when characters' weaknesses include allergies?" |

"There is also the unlucky sneeze. . . . I had forgotten about the sneeze. . . . the protagonist (who is also the narrator) is warned not to lesnerize." |

"All I can say is nobody better sneeze around here or all hell will break loose. . . . Kip, of course, will take seriously the warning not to lesnerize." |

submitted by [Robert Sheckley]

useful idiots -

To be a useful idiot is to see what you want to see and refuse to believe your lying eyes. |  
 
"Russian revolutionary Vladimir Lenin reportedly considered Communist sympathizers in the West 'useful idiots.' Today the term is used to describe naive people who are 'perceived as propagandists for a cause whose goals they do not understand, and who are used cynically by the leaders of the cause.'" |  
 
BBC World Service | Documentaries | "Useful Idiots": "Useful idiots, in a broader sense, refers to Western journalists, travellers and intellectuals who gave their blessing -– often with evangelistic fervour -– to tyrannies and tyrants, thereby convincing politicians and public that utopias rather than Belsens thrived. . . . 'I was taken around and shown things as a useful idiot . . . that's what my role was. I can't understand why I was so gullible.' . . . How can intellectual curiosity transform into active promotion of a dangerous lie? Why so many 'useful idiots'?" |  
 
Paul Roebling | "Why Are Liberals Called Useful Idiots?" "'Useful Idiots' is a pejorative term that was used by the Soviets to describe Soviet sympathizers in Western countries and in the United States in particular. It is thought that the Soviet leader Lenin was the first to use the term and it was used by the Soviets for many years to ridicule misguided Americans who were willing to take the Soviet/Marxist side against their own country. Some say that today the term 'useful idiots' can be used to describe those who support a malignant cause which they naïvely believe to be a force for good. This is an attempt on the part of liberals to deflect the label of 'useful idiots' from themselves. Thus we have hippie/Marxist liberals saying that the term 'useful idiots' was used by the Soviets to refer to American capitalists and not the hippie/Marxist liberal supporters of communism. Well, American liberals operate under the rules provided by the Marxist Saul Alinsky, who said that any means were justified to bring about Marxism in the United States. So, if the hippie/Marxist liberals say that capitalists were the 'useful idiots' to which the Soviets referred, then this lie is justified, and the more often the lie is repeated, the greater the number of weak-minded and uninformed individuals that will believe the lie." |  
 
There's more than a little doubt that Lenin ever used the term, the following perhaps being as close as he came: "Nowhere has the Versailles Treaty been analyzed so well as in the book by Keynes, a British representative at Versailles. In his book Keynes ridicules Wilson and the part he played in the Treaty of Versailles. Here, Wilson proved to be an utter simpleton, whom Clemenceau and Lloyd George twisted round their little fingers." |  
 
William Safire | On Language | April 12, 1987: "Here is what Mr. Annenkov claims he copied from notes in Lenin's handwriting, italics in the original: 'To speak the truth is a petit-bourgeois habit. To lie, on the contrary, is often justified by the lie's aim. The whole world's capitalists and their governments, as they pant to win the Soviet market, will close their eyes to the above-mentioned reality and will thus transform themselves into men who are deaf, dumb and blind. They will give us credits . . . they will toil to prepare their own suicide.'  
 
"Look, I know it's a little farfetched. I would be a lot happier with a photocopy of the original Lenin notes, but such proof is not readily available, and no explosion of glasnost in Moscow is going to allow Western scholars on-site inspection of all of Lenin's notes. However, this gives us one clue about the source of the 'sell us the rope' attribution, and the 'deaf, dumb, and blind' phrase may be one of the phrases that helped start the 'useful idiots,' whether or not originally by Lenin. This investigation needs more work, and we can hope it will be put on the agenda of the next summit."

e.g.,

Twitchy headline: "Bill Richardson and Eric Schmidt visit North Korea; Sen. John McCain calls them 'useful idiots.'" |  
 
"The Mental Illness Of Useful Idiots": "So there you have it: 'The common interest before self-interest.' That is the spirit of Hitler's program.  
 
"Doesn't this sound like the high moral ground that international socialists continue to claim? It's the morality of collectivism that unites world's useful idiots -- the lazy, the helpless, and the useless -- against the smart, the productive, the self-sustaining. This morality doesn't have to be rational, just, or sustainable -- as long as it warms your heart with feel-good notions and boosts your adrenaline, turning you into a self-righteous zealot convinced that the end justifies the means." |  
 
Hernando Today: "Vladimir Lenin is reputed to have coined the phrase 'useful idiots' to describe those in the West who acted as apologists for the political brutality and economic failure of Soviet Communism. The phrase kept coming to mind as I watched the so-called 'occupiers' marching in various cities across the country." |  
 
Mark Alexander | "Populist Socialism on the Rise": "The intellectually challenged Occupy morons have built their movement around the errant assertion that if the assets of the 1 Percent were redistributed, everyone would live happily ever after. Unfortunately, what the 35 Percenters really want is 'redistributive justice,' Obama's euphemism for socialism, which would actually require the redistribution of income from the other 65 percent of American families who live on earned income, so that everyone could be equally impoverished.  
 
"However, there's a problem with liquidating the assets of the 1 Percent (comprised of more celebs and pro athletes than Wall Street bankers), or even the top 25 percent of income earners: Most of their assets are on paper, and the rest of that 'wealth' is in the form of small businesses and real property that support the jobs of tens of millions of Americans who, unlike the Occupy crowd, actually work for a living -- and take pride in their occupations." |  
 
Islam's Useful Idiots: "This new generation of useful idiots also live in liberal democracies, but serve the cause of Islamofascism -- another virulent form of totalitarian ideology." |  
 
Doug Patton | Tuesday, October 18, 2011: "Vladimir Lenin is reputed to have coined the phrase 'useful idiots' to describe those in the West who acted as apologists for the political brutality and economic failure of Soviet Communism. The phrase kept coming to mind as I watched the so-called 'occupiers' marching in various cities across the country.  
 
"Direct references to Lenin’s use of the term are scarce, the most authoritative being lawyer, newspaperman, and author Ernest Cuneo, who wrote in 1969 that Lenin, in his farewell to his followers, said: 'Take your example from the good housewife who finds use for even a broken shoestring. A good Communist finds use for everything, and nothing is more useful than a useful idiot.'  
 
"Cueno went on to opine: 'The number of useful idiots who have unwittingly served the Communist cause since then speaks well for the diligence of Lenin’s disciples.'" |  
 
Metapedia: "Useful idiots are usually afraid to think for themselves or question anything outside of the line parroted in the controlled media.  
 
"The phrase was first used by Jewish mass murderer Vladimir Lenin. His useful idiots were going to help him conquer the world, but illness and death caught up with him first. In the event Joseph Stalin carried on where he left off. Uncle Joe was not an idiot but he was very effective as a mass murderer.  
 
"There are people and sources who claim that Lenin did not originate the expression. The Wikipedia is one such. However Wikiquote gives a series of Lenin quotes which tell us of an unrelenting savagery which makes it seem entirely likely." |  
 
Usefulidiots.com: "Useful idiots is a name that no group of people would like to be called. It is however, what most Americans are relied upon to be by the powers that be. When the voting segment of our country fails to vote to stay free and instead allows itself to fall for the same old word games and mind manipulation, they sadly earn the title of useful idiots. In contemporary America, too many Americans are naive about their political "system" and its politicians. Therefore, we are as a people, where we are, because we allow it. You see, America is a land of plenty, plenty of food, plenty of money, plenty of gods, plenty of corrupt politicians and alas, plenty of useful idiots that repetively vote for them.  
 
"America is also a land of plenty of mindless indifference towards the useful idiots and where their misguided votes are taking all of us. If this was of no consequence to the rest of America we could laugh at the idiocy; however, much in every way, we are impacted. Therefore, this site was created to identify the idiocy, explain it and seek to end it. We hope we can awaken some people to their errant ways by challenging them to see how arrogant politicians exploit their inadvertent "idiocy" and as a result, motivate them to reject the idiot's role once and for all.  
 
"We have observed that the conversion of the public consensus from dependency on God, self and family to dependency upon socialism is accomplished through incrementally rearranging how Americans view themselves and their place in the world. This systematic approach succeeds as long as it is done step by step via skillful propaganda in conjunction with an effectual dumbing down of the American people; these changes are accepted when done slowly.  
 
"While we are not necessarily conspiracy adherents, we can't help but see obvious patterns emerging to some of our government's focus and draw logical conclusions. Toward that end, our main purpose is to reveal the motive and process of these changes and to cause the alarm and healthy rational fear and skepticism needed to stop the socialism and the corrosive thinking behind it before it ruins our country."

submitted by HD Fowler

- That dude was a little prick, but he did a fine job of making the Superfriends look like the square, hokey, boring, fist-resting-on-hips, knobs that they were. Did they ever make a Mxyzpltlk for the new Justice League? I like Justice League! Way different from their '80s counterparts. I just wish I had more time to watch it. 10 Amusing Collective Nouns Examples of Collective Nouns 1. A cuddle of teddy bears 2. A conjunction of grammarians 3. A promise of barmen 4. An obeisance of servants 5. A staff of employees 6. A fraid of ghosts 7. A nastiness of villains 8. A promise of tomorrows 9. A prudence of vicars 10. A clique of photographers http://wordsilove.org/archives/115/vag/

e.g.,

Well, it’s hard to teach wit - but all of us can learn the next best thing: the approximation of it by obfuscation, i.e. using big, difficult, and obscure words. So, to do our part in improving the quality of insults on teh Interweb, Neatorama has come up with a list of 10 Insulting Words You Should Know:

submitted by

-

submitted by

dog whistle - I've been hearing this used as a political buzzword for quite a while and finally decided to check its meaning. Wikipedia » "Dog-whistle politics":Dog-whistle politics is political messaging employing coded language that appears to mean one thing to the general population but has an additional, different or more specific resonance for a targeted subgroup. The phrase is only ever used as a pejorative, because of the inherently deceptive nature of the practice and because the dog-whistle messages are frequently themselves distasteful, for example by empathizing with racist attitudes. It is an analogy to dog whistles, which are built in such a way that their high-frequency whistle is heard by dogs, but is inaudible to humans."

e.g.,

  • Who says the pot can't call the kettle black? I thought it was a stupid saying when I first saw it in the "Terry and the Pirates" comic strip as a teenager -- well over 50 years ago. And I still think it's stupid.  
     
    I was skinny then, but I'm fat now -- and so is Michelle Obama. Somehow calling her fat is supposed to be a dog whistle as well as racist. To me, it's neither: it's a fact. |

submitted by HD Fowler

-

submitted by

stultiloquent - Given to, or characterized by, silly talk; babbling. {Duplicate.}

e.g., It's not just that HD's stultiloquent, it's that he's so pleased with himself at being so. Pleased as punch, he is.

submitted by Lillith

old person - Mother, father, grandmother, grandmother, aunt, uncle. . . .

e.g., Old person: Go do your homework. You: Mer.

submitted by HD Fowler

upmwl - Untrained Puny-Minded Weak Liberals. Is there any other kind?

e.g., "Alva forgot that, in our definition of Hitler in the People's Glossary we had set a strict rule stipulating that 'any such discussions should only be allowed to Party-approved professors of progressive science,' so that untrained puny-minded weak liberals (UPMWL) wouldn't trespass into an ideological minefield and blow up the carefully constructed progressive defenses -- which is what Alva just did, being the aforementioned UPMWL.  
 
We wouldn't be concerned with what's written in Alva's blogspeck if this was not a recurrent theme of many a diatribe issued lately by the UPMWL, from Alva all the way to George Soros."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

fishead - A person obsessed with fish.

e.g., When it comes to Bear Lake, Bryce is a fishead.

submitted by Bryce

peckerwood - "Peckerwood (or simply Wood) is a pejorative slang term coined in the 19th century by southern Black Americans to describe poor whites. Blacks saw blackbirds as a symbol of themselves, and the woodpecker as a representation of working class whites. They considered them loud and troublesome like the bird, often with red hair similar to the bird's red plumes. This word is still widely used by southern blacks to refer to southern whites." That's the start of the entry at Wikipedia, less the hyperlinks. While that may be the definition peckerwood started out with, I know it was used with a different connotation when I was growing up. The sense of the word I got was that it was a substitute for pissant or something similar.

e.g., Mom: I can't find HD anywhere in the house. Has that little peckerwood gone down again the street to play with . . . who? Annette? Little HD: I'm under the picnic table, Mommy. I'm using it to make a tent. . . . Annette's not home.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

pecksniff - A pious fraud, The word comes from Dickens' Seth Pecksniff character in Martin Chuzzlewit. Pecksniffery, pecksniffian, Pecksniffianism, pecksniffish, Pecksniffism. Wordnik doesn't have a definition for Pecksniff yet, but several examples from The Life and Adventures of Martin Chuzzlewith have been added -- including some I've added below.

e.g., Curiously, this is one of Bill O'Reilly's favorite words, the man being somewhat of a Pecksniff himself. | Our most recently revealed political Pecksniff: Mike Crapo. | "Chris Matthews: Pecksniff"  

Lance Mannion: "Pecksniffery": "Pecksniff spends a lot of the book standing, metaphorically, at the front of the Temple reminding God and everybody else within earshot of how virtuous he is. So we're not surprised when first chance he has he gets a snootful and makes a lecherous lunge at Mrs Todgers. . . .  
 
"Sitcoms and movies love Pecksniff and trot him out again and again, in various disguises, even in drag. We know the guy. We laugh at him as soon as he starts in pontificating. We don't believe in his moralizing for a single moment...except when he appears in real life in the guise of a conservative politician or pundit.  
 
"One Pecknsiff after another pops up and gets knocked down and just as soon as the remains are swept up and carted away another one struts up the aisle and plants himself before us to tell us how good and pure he is or she is. . . .  
 
"Pecksniffs are always ready with an excuse that explains how it was that they didn't commit the sin we thought they did and how it wasn't really a sin at all. . . .  
 
"The Pecksniff here isn't Kerik, who's a different but just as common brand of hypocrite. . . .  
 
"The Pecksniff is 'the stunningly attractive' Judith Regan. . . .  
 
"Regan's Pecksniffery includes spending a lot of time on TV condemning other people's less than wholesome sex lives. Bill Clinton's and Monica Lewinsky's, for example. . . .  
 
"We know these people. We meet them all the time. When Pecksniff walks into a room we've got his number the minute he opens his mouth and starts to spout.  
 
"Except when the room he walks into is a TV studio or a Congressional hearing room and Pecksniff has had the sense to identify himself or herself as a conservative.  
 
"Give her a year. Judith Regan will be back on Fox telling us all about immorality and the death of outrage. Right alongside Bill Bennett and Bill O'Reilly."

submitted by HD Fowler

zemblanity - orarian at Wordnik: "The opposite of serendipity, the faculty of making unhappy, unlucky, and unexpected discoveries by design; the inexorable discovery of what we don't what to know. Word derived from Zembla, a barren, frigid Artic island -- Nova Zembla -- the site of a nuclear facility now used for testing non-nuclear explosives.
-Peter Bowler May 5, 2008 |  
 
Armadillo, by William Boyd, 1998: "So what is the opposite of Serendip, a southern land of spice and warmth, lush greenery and hummingbirds, seawashed, sunbasted? Think of another world in the far north, barren, icebound, cold, a world of flint and stone. Call it Zembla. Ergo: zemblanity, the opposite of serendipity, the faculty of making unhappy, unlucky and expected discoveries by design. Serendipity and zemblanity: the twin poles of the axis around which we revolve."  
 
Robert K Merton and Elinor Barber in the masterpiece on the subject, The Travels and Adventures of Serendipity (2004): “Serendipity’s initial unique and compendious meaning of a particular kind of complex phenomenon – the ‘discovery of things unsought’ or the experience of ‘looking for one thing and finding another’– becomes ever more eroded as it becomes ever more popular. Ultimately the word becomes so variously employed in various socio-cultural strata as to become virtually vacuous. For many, the very sound of serendipity rather than its metaphorical etymology takes hold so that at the extreme it is taken to mean little more than a Disneylike expression of pleasure, good feeling, or happiness. No longer a niche-word filling a semantic gap, the vogue word became a vague word.”  
 
Wikipedia/Serendipity: "One aspect of Walpole's original definition of serendipity, often missed in modern discussions of the word, is the need for an individual to be 'sagacious' enough to link together apparently innocuous facts in order to come to a valuable conclusion."

e.g., "When Serendipity becomes Zemblanity," by Richard Boyle: "Although zemblanity doesn’t have the style or even perhaps the necessity of serendipity, there are aspects of the association of the two words that provide food for thought. For instance, what if Zembla was not a separate island but an opposite aspect of Serendib, that zemblanity was an incompatible but nevertheless equally essential and indispensable part of serendipity?  
 
"In Sri Lanka, such an intertwining has appeared in the past 30 years. Serendipity and zemblanity have both been present, inseparably tied. Yet while guidebooks and such-like have waffled on about serendipity in a meaningless fashion, many downplayed the zemblanity that has hovered, ready to catch even the ultra-wary in its grasp. The question is: what will happen to zemblanity now?" |  
 
Examples from Wordnik:

submitted by HD Fowler

blazed - High on drugs, stoned.

e.g., Eye test

 
aLrighty, so at this moment i am blazed out of my mind.
i am sitting at my house finally feeling the happiest i have felt in a very very long time.
this is probably at the moment the highest moment in my life.
see i have had a lot of weed which i guess after two months of being high like twice a day i guess i was feeling like i wanted to be really high.
but my friend erica, who happened to have an eigth of shrooms that she didnt want anymore so she said i could have them;.
so not only have i smoked like 7 or 8 bowls of insane weed i have also eaten an eigth of shrooms.
i ma very high nad off my rocker so i am sorry in advance for all of my misspeelings and complete ramling episodes.
see all of a sudden my life has been like three times better.
i have sent in my applications to the two schools i wanted and am almost garunteed entry.
sorry i walked away from my comp and almost got lost.
but i found my way back.
i think i need to go smoke more weed since its really early and im need to get more blazed.
so i am going to try and talk in this more to everyone reading this though they are far and in between.
if isaid that right im not sure. so later for now.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

slugs - "Special low-interest Treasury securities offered to state and local governments to temporarily invest proceeds from municipal bond sales." | "Special nonmarketable certificates, notes, and bonds offered to state and local governments as a means to invest proceeds from their own tax-exempt financing. Interest rates and maturities comply with IRS arbitrage provisions."

e.g., "Slugs, which count against the debt limit, have been suspended several times over the last 20 years to avoid hitting the debt ceiling." | "Slugs are offered in both time deposit and demand deposit forms. Time deposit certificates have maturities of up to one year. Notes mature in one to ten years and bonds mature in more than ten years. Demand deposit securities are one-day certificates rolled over with a rate adjustment daily."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

titbit - A real word, alternative spelling of tidbit: "(Cookery) a tasty small piece of food; dainty." | "A pleasing scrap of anything, such as scandal."

e.g., And, amid these rich and potent devices of the culinary art (not one of which, probably, had been tested, within the memory of any man's grandfather), poor Hepzibah was seeking for some nimble little titbit, which, with what skill she had, and such materials as were at hand, she might toss up for breakfast. House Of Seven Gables by Hawthorne, Nathaniel  
 
He dared him to stop and do battle with him; but Sheeta only loped on after the luscious titbit now almost within his reach. Jungle Tales of Tarzan by Burroughs, Edgar Rice  
 
"This troublesome and impertinent little fowl," said he, "would make a delicate titbit to begin dinner with." Tanglewood Tales by Hawthorne, Nathaniel

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

muchtard - An overly generous amount of the spicy condiment derived from the process of grinding the seeds of the mustard plant. Often found at food stands at fairs and carnivals.

e.g., Look! You've got a big, yellow muchstach from too much muchtard on your hot dog!

submitted by Charlie Lesko

adonic - (Rhymes with "ma-JOHN-ick"; adj.) 1. Of or pertaining to Adonis, the Greek lad who embodied the best of male youth, vigor, and beauty; 2. Of or pertaining to masculine beauty (usually the muscley, strong sort, but also the two-days'-growth of beard kind with smoother muscles but with a lot of charm); 3. Characterized by the same indicia of masculine beauty and attractiveness borne by the mythical Adonis.

e.g., "He tries to ask Jennifer out, but he only does it while Paul is standing next to him. I mean, sure, Mike's fairly good looking, I suppose, but next to Paul, all of us look like road kill. The guy is adonic. ... He probably knows how to puke handsomely."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

guy candy - (n.) 1. Well-muscled, good-looking men of the sort it pleases women to ogle; 2. Such a fellow deliberately placed to draw women's attention. [The counterpart of calling beautiful women, especially those dressed to draw men's eyes, "eye candy." Well, I guess men so placed or portrayed are just as much "eye candy" as women, but the rhyme was so good, I just had to document it.]

e.g., If you've seen the ad on tv of the bodybuilder directing traffic, then you've seen purest guy candy. But guy candy doesn't have to be that Adonic. My wife truly enjoys watching shows starring Adrian Paul, and my elder daughter delights in watching Orlando Bloom, Messrs. Paul and Bloom being, according to them, the definition of "guy candy."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

all the livelong - (phrasal adverb) 1. All day; 2. Days and days; 3. For a long, long time; and, figuratively, 4. Forever. [From the old folk song "Working on the Railroad," which includes the immortal line "all the livelong day," meaning "constantly, 24/7, etc."]

e.g., "We're gonna be rewriting this stupid report all week." "Yep. Banging away at the keyboards all the livelong." | "Okay, why don't we reroute the 1080 around Wichita? After it's gone by, we can bring the 988 up past Wichita and on to Topeka." "Yeah, that works ... whoa! Look at the time! We've been working on the railroad all the livelong!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

sasqwatch - A timepiece used by BigFoot.

e.g., How does Bigfoot tell time? With a Sasqwatch.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

panfrytheism - Belief that the gods can be found through the stovetop, the right cookware, and a little good oil.

e.g., Sarah didn't go to a conventional church, but pursued her panfrytheism enthusiastically in her kitchen with a decent no-stick, thick bottom skillet and olive oil.

submitted by Mark Lee - (www)

silverware count - Counting the silverware after a dinner party, not to make sure nothing was stolen, but to make sure no silverware gets thrown out in the trash.

e.g., "Ah, that was good. Shall we adjourn to the living room for some after-dinner conversation?" "Let's do a silverware count first. You remember what happened the last time, don't you? I was lucky I didn't lose anything. This is the safe way to go from now on."

submitted by HD Fowler

alex the blue nosed reindeer - Alex was the first reindeer with a bright shiny nose until another reindeer came and stole all the fame. Alex's nose glows bright blue. He enjoys playing reindeer games, and pulling Santa's sleigh.

e.g., Alex the blue nosed reindeer had a very shiny nose, and if you ever saw it you would even say it glows.

submitted by Santa Claus

heroine - Heroin. We should be so lucky as to be able to replace heroin with heroines.

e.g., "Share his heroine needles with him."

submitted by

dealy-bopper - A special thing, the right thing, just what you need to do the job.

e.g., This little dealy-bopper here cost me plenty, but I'll be an ace with it in my hands.

submitted by Steve McDonald

-

submitted by

beanup - A really awesome person.

e.g., My friend is a beanup. | Hey all you beanups, what's up?

submitted by Spencer - (www)

contrapreneur - "Someone who foolishly invests in a declining market. Coined by James Wesley Rawles."

e.g., Am I deliberately investing in a declining market? Yes, I'm a contrapreneur -- except for the being foolish part. I'm selling short. (No, I'm not really doing that.) |  
 
"Are Your Neighbors Contrapreneurs?": "The folks that bought 'spec houses at the top of the market are what I call contrapreneurs. They are holding an investment with steadily declining value. Most of them, sadly, used borrowed money to do so. Thus, not only are they riding a down escalator, but they must continue to service their debt on a house with a negative cash flow. Strapped for cash, many overextended themselves, and they are defaulting in alarmingly large numbers. Just as I predicted, some of them are starting to abandon their houses without so much as a fare-the-well to their bankers. This is a downright ugly situation. If the US economy noses down into recession (as I anticipate), with corporate layoffs intensifying the mortgage default numbers, then this could very well go down in history as a housing market collapse."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

prepper - From Wikipedia, the hit or miss online encyclopedia: "Prepper: A synonym for survivalist that came into common usage during the late 1990s. Used interchangeably with survivalist much as retreater was in the 1970s. Refers to one who is prepared or making preparations." (Not all preppers are what I generally think of as survivalists, and only very few are likely to be crazed or extreme survivalists.) | "It seems that many people are seeking a proper way to define a prepper. A prepper may come from many different walks of life and prepare in a variety of different ways. This has made it difficult for many people to define a prepper. Here is a simple definition that may help give you a better understanding of what it means to be a prepper." "Definition of a Prepper: Prepper(s) (noun): An individual or group that prepares or makes preparations in advance of or prior to any change in normal circumstances or lifestyle without significant reliance on other persons (i.e., being self-reliant) or without substantial assistance from outside resources (govt., etc.) in order to minimize the effects of that change on their current lifestyle."

e.g., "Preppers are about doing things our grandmothers, grandfathers, and great grandparents were doing in the fifties: gardening, canning, raising chickens and goats." | ''One of the fundamentals of prepping is you don't let anyone know what you've got or why you've got it.'' | "Mrs Lanza, 52, was a 'prepper' -– so called because they are preparing for a breakdown in civilised society -– who apparently became obsessed with guns and taught Adam and his older brother, Ryan, how to shoot, even taking them to local ranges." |  

"Prepping a growing movement or a fad?" | November 23, 2012. (Some errors silently corrected.): What started as a taboo topic that would get you odd looks if mentioned in public, has become a growing and generally excepted movement. Being a survivalist still remains a bad word for many, yet if you are a "prepper" you are "normal" and often praised. The prepping movement has gotten so big that it now has its own unique language, acronyms, and nomenclature.  
 
Being a prepper is as normal as being a bird watcher, stamp collector, football fan, or any other hobbyist. . . . Call it a movement or call it a fad, the question remains will this widely shared craze be here to stay or will it be short lived?
 
I considered using (sic) to note the misuse of excepted for accepted in the first sentence. However, I think the author is right with the sentence as written -- that survivalism is a movement Average Jo looks on with a wary eye. Average Jo surely thinks survivalists remain close to the fringes of society -- that many, if not most, of them are close to paranoid and are considerably closer to going off the deep end than she is. (I'm not always sure about myself. However, I'm not armed to the teeth with semi-automatic weapons and potentially dangerous.) |  
 
"Was suspected shooters mother a prepper?": "If there is one single most important thing that a Prepper should prepare for, it is the safety of our children."  
 
comingstorm December 16, 2012 at 2:49 pm:"In the public’s eye, preppers are mentally unbalanced to begin with. With this idiot's mother being a prepper, she will be and is beginning to be vilified as one of the causes of this tragedy. That dumbass show Doomsday Preppers doesn’t improve the image a responsible, self-reliant prepper one iota either."  
 
"How to Become a Prepper": "Preppers are genuine in their beliefs that something massive is going to happen. Over the last couple of years, without knowing about preppers, I began to think about stockpiling freeze dried food in case of a long-lasting emergency. Am I a prepper? I think so -- to an extent." (If you think you might be interested in prepping, this essay might be a good place to start.)

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

wowcohol - An alcoholic beverage that's so superior in terms of taste and effect that it makes the drinker say, "Wow!" {ED. This might make a good brand name for a line of alcoholic beverages.}

e.g., The proliferation of flavored vodkas practically guarantees that everyone will find her own personal wowcohol.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

nflephant - A person, who has grown very fat due to an inactive existence, watching professional football on television while consuming large quantities of high-calorie snacks and drink.

e.g., Isn't it amazing how NFLephants can criticize football players who are in top physical condition? This is particularly annoying, considering that the NFLephant probably couldn't bang out a single push-up.

submitted by Mitchel Yerzy - (www)

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