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cut the mustard - "To meet the requirements; to measure up." Have you ever wondered where that came from?

Taken from Maurice Wessen's Dictionary of American Slang (1934). Now out of copyright, the book consists of some 422 pages of mostly one-line entries, for a total of ~13,000 slang words and expressions in use by 1934. H.L. Mencken dismissed the book as "an extremely slipshod and even ridiculous work." It may not be scholarly; however, it may well contain slang you won't run across in more scholarly works. The same can be said of Berrey and Van den Bark's American Thesaurus of Slang (1942) -- in particular from the annotated copy I finally managed to get out of storage and back in sight.

I intend to skim both books for slang and add some that catches my eye to the pd, particularly "quaint" slang that's no longer in use. … Not to put cut the mustard in the category of obsure or quaint slang. I think it's still being used, but I'm somewhat antiquated and quaint myself.

This entry is being made because I stumbled across cut the mustard as I was looking for references to Wessen's book. What I found was an explanation for the curious use of mustard. I found the material quoted below only because I inadvertently googled «"Wessen's Dictionary of American Slang" Wessen». Had I googled what I intended to («"Dictionary of American Slang" Wessen»), I might not have found The Universal Digital Library Million Book Collection. Does the word serendipity fit?

The Universal Digital Library Million Book Collection
"[Not mentioned] in Thornton's An American Glossary (1912); in Eric Partridge's A Dictionary of Slang and Unconventional English (1953); nor does Mencken comment on it in The American Language.

"A book which Mencken once derided as 'an extremely slipshod and even ridiculous work,' Maurice Wessen's Dictionary of American Slang (1934), does, however, list the expression. So also does Berrey and Van den Bark's American Thesaurus of Slang (1942), entering it under three different though related semantic headings: 'to accomplish'; 'skill, be able to do'; and 'succeed with.' This latter meaning is picked up by Harold Wentworth, who lists the phrase, curiously, not in his Dictionary of American Slang (1960), but in his earlier American Dialect Dictionary (1944). Although Wentworth gives dates of 1916 and 1923, and locations of South Carolina, Kansas, and Southwest Missouri as sources for his entry, he does not give an etymology, nor any illustrative citations.

"In addition to the definition, the complete entry in WNID-3 gives a usage label ('slang'), an illustrative citation, a variant, and a cross-reference. The illustrative citation is from the Atlantic Monthly, and illustrates the definition and usage clearly enough: 'in our work … those of our fellow workers who can't or won't cut the mustard must of necessity be shoved out -- Atlantic.' But a variant, 'cut the muster,' listed in no other standard lexicographic reference, is also given, with no explanation other than the cross-reference, 'compare PASS MUSTER.' I believe the cross-reference to be misleading, and probably in error; but the variant supplies the key to an etymological possibility that the editors of WNID-3 have missed. At the entry for pass muster (p. 1560), there are definitions for 'passing an inspection' of one sort or another, but no elucidation of 'cutting the muster, or mustard. Nor do the entries at muster throw any new light on the matter. The cross-reference appears to lead nowhere. Because they have excluded entries recorded before 1755, the editors of WNID-3 have missed or ignored an archaic meaning of muster recorded in OED: 'a pattern, specimen, sample' (VI, pt. II, 794). OED notes that this usage has been 'confined to certain particular branches of commerce.' Partridge reinforces this with an entry more fully explanatory (p. 545): musta or muster -- the make or pattern of anything; a sample: Anglo-Chinese and -Indian: c. 1620; in 1563, as mostra, which is the Portuguese origin. Coll. H., 3rd ed., 'Very gen. used in commercial transactions all over the world.''

"This archaic meaning for muster,' reaching back into the 16th century, provides a possible, although admittedly conjectural, explanation for the origin of the phrase, cut the muster, and its phonetic variant, cut the mustard, which, I submit, originally had nothing to do with 'mustard' at all. Once 'muster' is recognized as an old commercial term for 'form' or 'pattern,' the meaning of the rarer 'cut the muster' makes more sense: the cutting of such forms or patterns -- for cloth goods, for example -- would require great skill and precision."


  

e.g., Lillith: Betsy, have you noticed how bizarre some of HD's output has become? Do you think he may be getting too old to be our Principal Editor? Betsy: I dunno. Are you saying you think he's too old to cut the mustard? You bucking for his job, Lillith? Have you forgotten that you're 100 days older than he is? … Thought so. Besides, he's always spoken in paragraphs since I met him. Lillith: You mean blathered on like an old fool? Yeah, you're right.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

serendipity - "(n) Good luck in making unexpected and fortunate discoveries."

e.g., Needed to add this real word to make an existing link work -- for an entry I had made as a result of my serendipitously running across a possible explanation for the curious use of mustardcut the mustard.

submitted by HD Fowler

hd fowler - "The Bible Belt is an informal term for a region in the south-eastern and south-central United States in which socially conservative evangelical Protestantism is a significant part of the culture and Christian church attendance across the denominations is generally higher than the nation's average." | "Bible Belt (1:103) -- Bible Belt was a term which H. L. Mencken coined in 1924, basing it on such phrases as Cotton Belt and Corn Belt, he intended it to refer to the rural areas of the South and Midwest where a fundamentalist belief in the historical accuracy of the Bible held sway. Mencken first used the phrase as part of a heading in the 'Americana' section of the American Mercury (111:10, October 1924, p. 171): 'Progress of the New Jurisprudence in the Bible Belt, as described in a Centerville dispatch to the Ottumwa [Iowa] Courier.' The phrase appears frequently in later issues (November 1924, p. 290; February 1925, p. 154; etc.) and in the fourth edition of Mencken's The American Language (New York, 1936, pp. 230, 239, 309, 522), though there is no mention of it in the editions of 1919, 1921, and 1923. Mathews' Dictionary of Americanisms provides two examples dated February 1926 and June 1948. Mencken subsequently coined similar phrases -- Epworth League Belt (American Mercury, January 1925) and Bryan Belt (ibid., November 1925), but these did not 'catch on'. -- Mac E. Barrick, Shippensburg State College, Shippensburg, Pa."

e.g., I lived outside the Bible Belt during the best years of my life, but that was just coincidental.

submitted by Bible Belt - (www)

rakehell - A lewd, dissolute fellow; a debauchee; a rake.

e.g., I've been watching Californication off and on lately. Do any of its male characters count as rakehells?

submitted by rakehell - (www)

«available» -

submitted by «available»

rakehell - "A lewd, dissolute fellow; a debauchee; a rake." A real word that's fallen into disuse.

e.g., I've been watching Californication off and on for the last day or so. Do any of the male characters count as rakehells?

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

zzentry - The final entry in a dictionary.

e.g., Typically, many dictionaries will have the word 'zebra' as the Zzentry, but that's all in the past now.

submitted by David Mock - (www)

opusculum - "An assessment both appropriate and modest. An opusculum is a little work, usually a book." {ED. Will have to come back to this word after I learn something about it etymology. I almost missed that it starts with opus-.} Quinion goes on: "For most of us, opusculum means nothing, which disgusted the late Anthony Burgess. In one of his diatribes in old age lamenting the decline of education he challenged guests at his dinner table with idiolect [micro-dialect], palinlogue [a palinlogue of a word is made by writing its letters backwards. All palindromes are palinlogues, but not all palinromes are palinlogues. (?)], desquamation [loss of bits of outer skin by peeling or shedding or coming off in scales], lesbic [Of, relating to, or being a lesbian.], autophagous, monophthongal, autocephalous, inesculent, allomorph, strabismus … and opusculum." Well, I'm certainly challenged — by every single one of them.

e.g., If I put all that I've written since I retired into a book, it might take thousands of printed pages. Still, it would be an opusculum.

submitted by [Michael Quinion]

wabi-sabi - Finding beauty in the imperfections, an acceptance of the cycle of life and death, in Japanese

e.g., Those on Death Row have the ultimate sense of wabi-sabi in their final days.

submitted by Joel Parker - (www)

kabelsalat - A mess of tangled cables, literally (from German) "cable salad."

e.g., The audio equipment backstage created a kabelsalat to support the band onstage.

submitted by Joel Parker - (www)

jug - Jail, etc. Synonyms: bastille, big house [slang], bridewell, brig, calaboose, can, clink [slang], cooler, coop, guardroom, hock, hold, hoosegow, jailhouse, joint [slang], jail, lockup, nick [British slang], pen, penitentiary, pokey [slang], prison, quod [British slang], slam, slammer, stir [slang], stockade, tolbooth [Scottish]

e.g., Beam me up, Scotty; I'll risk incomplete consubstantiation rather than stay in this jug any longer. | I always knew Sam would end up in (the) jug. | As a verb: "The luckless crooks got jugged before they knew what hit them." Synonyms: {confined | detained| imprisoned | locked up | put behind bars | put in jail}.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

«available» -

submitted by «available»

islamophobiaphobia - Greg Gutfeld claims to have invented the word, as Islamophobia-phobia: "fear of being labeled Islamophobic." I'll give him the benefit of the doubt and not look for a use earlier than August 29, 2010.

e.g., The further to the right you are in the American political spectrum, the less likely you are to be an islamophobiaphobic and the more likely you are to be islamophobic.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

«available» -

submitted by

windsday - Wendsday. Wednesday.

e.g., I'm agonna tell Mom what you said Windsday night. She'll be appalled that you were so crass and insensitive. | "Why is 'Wendsday' spelled 'Wednesday'? Shouldn't they have just named it 'Wendsday' instead? Hrrrrmmm.… The mind ponders sometimes." "Named after the god Woden, it was once called Woden's Day. Over time, that morphed into Wednesday." "How did you know that?" "I'm over-educated.

submitted by HD Fowler

tweet - A ≤140-character message that says, "Look at me. Look at me." (That took only sixty-one characters.)

e.g., Look at me. Look at me. Tweets are for twits. Look at me. Look at me. You can say a lot in seventy characters. Look at me. Look at me again.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

«available» - «available»

e.g., «available»

submitted by - (www)

submitt - A second rate glove.

e.g., John said that the glove he bought from ABC was already falling apart. It was a submitt.

submitted by Craig Dodge

huszonager - (n) Huszonager, a person between twenty and twenty-nine years old. Huszon is a Hungarian word for twenty. Has the same syllabification as the word Teletubbies: hor-zin-ager . (adj) huszonage, has the same syllabification as the word family: hor-zin-age .

e.g., Eric, a twenty-year-old player for the Boston Celtics, performed the best in our last NBA game. I think he is the most promising huszonager of his time.

submitted by Ndifreke Ebunkamado - (www)

punctionary - Quite simply a portmanteau of pun and dictionary. It represents any book, index, inventory, etc. of puns. Basically a gargantuan list of puns is equivalent to a dictionary of puns, hence the term puctionary. FYI: Just came up with the term after it dawned on me how replete the pseudodictionary was with puns.

e.g., Alice embodied a pun machine after poring over a punctionary the previous night, her friends found her quite amusing.

submitted by Jason Schwartz - (www)

gliesian - Of, pertaining to, or like the Gliese System or its hypothetical inhabitants of associated planets.

e.g., "In 2008, a message from earth was digitally sent to the Gliese System, in hopes that the Gliesians would receive it and reply. So far, zilch." "Umm, how far away is this Gliese System?" "You're right. Scratch that. It's more than twenty-two light years away, so there's no way we could have received a response by now. What was I thinking?"

submitted by Robert James Liguori - (www)

pmht - A way of apologising for dumping your own personal hashtags on someone else's property. This includes forum, webpages, social etc. It can also be written as #pardonmyhashtag.

e.g., I'm really sorry for posting on your site but I've just got some new designs on my website. #BuyMyStuff #pardonmyhashtag #PMHT

submitted by Pete Clark - (www)

flusterdate - To cause someone to be simultaneously frustrated and flustered.

e.g., "Try not to let your mother-in-law flusterdate you during her visit." That's be might nigh impossible. She's planning to stay six weeks, possible a couple of months or more."

submitted by Katie - (www)

swageport - To channel your inner swag and use the energy to vanish from a scene. Think teleportation.

e.g., This party sucks. I'm swageporting.

submitted by Emma

wifing - A term of endearment that describes the delightful & regular habit of your dearly beloved to say something to you (seemingly under her breath) just as you are about to leave the room, or are halfway up the stairs or are in the process of concluding a phone call.

e.g., When speaking to a friend on the phone: "I'm sorry, Jack, Earlene was wifing me and I didn't hear what either one of you said. | Honey, you keep wifing me, but you know I can't hear you when the water's running.

submitted by John C Jeffers - (www)

selfpromi - A photo posted publicly, to promote anything. In my case my pots, tiles, chawan tea bowls etc. online to create awareness of what I do.

e.g., As a ceramic artist/potter I post a selfpromi of some of my latest work on Facebook, and elsewhere. I recently posted a selfpromi selfpromi of my work that's in an international exhibition.

submitted by Danny Kostyshin - (www)

deerest friend - Someone who will buy her friend a cheeseburger at two in the morning if asked.

e.g., Andy is Katy's deerest friend because he bought her a cheeseburger in the middle of the night.

submitted by Katka

fruitile - Fruitless + futile. From "The Dick Van Dyke" Show, Season 4, episode 3, "Love and the Babysitter," written by Bill Persky and Sam Denoff. Originally aired October 7, 1964 (from Wikipedia).

e.g., I've tried to get her to notice me, but my efforts have been fruitile.

submitted by Dan Day - (www)

maniative - To sporadically rotate aggressive mental states in short succession due to caffeine- or alcohol-induced chemical exposure to thrash metal in industrialized complexes.

e.g., My imbalanced mind is unacceptable. It's maniative.

submitted by Lyserjos

withdrouwral - An act or process of withdrawing: retreat, removal, or detachment, when said by Cat Morgan.

e.g., I hate it when I'm reading something coming and then see the word withdrouwral coming.

submitted by Andy - (www)

doxionary - The Oxford English Dictionary

e.g., It may be in Webster's, but is it in the Doxionary?

submitted by Marilyn Butler - (www)

coprotopia - A social system that is utterly crappy.

e.g., It dawned on John that he would never be able to get out of his shabby rental since he was stuck living in a dismal coprotopia.

submitted by Mark Lee - (www)

asshold - One who internally retains toxicity.

e.g., Schickeldorf is full of crap. He keeps his negativity bundled up inside and it makes him toxic to himself and everyone around him. He is an asshold.

submitted by Redbendad - (www)

feelaquarts - Feeling something unbelievably soft, or unbelievable rough. Often used when feeling giant man-eating reptiles.

e.g., "Do you want to come with me on the feelaquarts safari in Africa? We'd be there about six weeks." "Er, umm … did you say man-eating reptiles? If you did, I think I'll take a pass -- unless you're paying all expenses. Are you?"

submitted by Benjamin Franklin

finae nae - To be better than other people, at everything.

e.g., "I feel as if I'm finae nae than all you mother suckers." "Keep feelin' that way … while you can. You'll find out different soon enough."

submitted by Benjamin Franklin

ennuiderdog - An apathetic, unmotivated dachshund.

e.g., Ignoring my offer of bacon, my ennuinerdog Abbergator looked at me through barely-open eyes, unable to even muster up the effort to open her mouth.

submitted by Douglas Deru - (www)

aftbears - Opposite of forebears, i.e., descendants: "all of the offspring of a given progenitor."

e.g., Yogi knew his forebears had always lived in Jellystone, but he wondered if his aftbears would, too.

submitted by Malcolm - (www)

forbert - Lame. Not the limping variety of lame.

e.g., Korra's example was fobert. Maybe she'll honor us by resubmitting her word with an example she's given more thought to.

submitted by korra - (www)

aquatacotton - Sorry, the special characters you included don't work. Please try again.

e.g., Great … now my goddamn socks are all wet.

submitted by dajuice - (www)

acolytebloke - Any former sideman of any Billy Childish band or other similar Billy Childish turn out.

e.g., I wouldn't wanna be one of them cast off Billy Childish acolyteblokes, pretending they're something going forward off the back of their past involvement with him.

submitted by Topper Waterworks - (www)

swiggledawhizz - What you call a person who's a complete jerk, but is so cool everybody loves her. «See Rich Boy, Primadonna, and Horrible Lovable Wonky-Tonky Slumwhack.»

e.g., I can't believe Mom invited so many swiggledawhizz to my party. I'll never forgive her. Never. «Emma's too polite to call any of her friends a swiggledawhizz, but she apparently knows several. »

submitted by Emma - (www)

aerotheuthida - A flying squid. The aerotheuthida is a magnificent creature coming in shades of grey, blue, purple, and even on rare occasions, rainbow. It's delicate flesh is covered in a film that allows it to become invisible to the human eye. Its flighters are located in the center of its tentacles. The aerotheuthida can grow from about two inches (cute widdle baby size) to about three miles long (grandpa size). They also eat humans.

e.g., Tommy, look at dat! It's da aerotheuthida. It's flying. Look at dat. Tommy, look at dat.

submitted by Emma - (www)

pleisure - The enjoyment that comes from doing nothing.

e.g., It was my pleisure to spend the entire afternoon tweezing my gray hairs.

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

klarflunking - Said of the sound you voice makes when you say you have a frog in your throat.

e.g., Ignore my voice, it's klarflunking again.

submitted by Jenna - (www)

«available» -

e.g.,

submitted by amy - (www)

art bullies - Art people who hate on non-art people when they're interested in buying art.

e.g., Chris and Ras are art bullies.

submitted by Ras

smilifier - Someone who is good at making others smile.

e.g., I love Sandra; she's such a smilifier.

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

mikon - Mikon comes from "my con," short for "my condolences." You say this to someone bereaved to indicate that you feel sorry for them and hope they can feel better soon. {ED. Unfortunately, I've heard "My condolences" many, many more times than I've wanted to the last several months. "Mikon" would be welcome respite.}

e.g., "My grandad's very ill … I'm really worried about him." "I'm sure he'll be fine … mikon."

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

wordgoat - This word refers to the curiosity of goats. So, a wordgoat is someone who is always curious to learn new, interesting words.

e.g., My friend is such a wordgoat. She can't read a word she doesn't know without instantly wanting to know its meaning, its etymology, its antonyms, and synonyms -- in a word: everything.

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

utopify - To make something into a utopia, that is, an idealistic world. Antonym: dystopify.

e.g., World leaders should work together to utopify our planet.

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

dystopify - To make something into a dystopia, that is, a world that is as far away from moral, psychological, and economical stability as possible. Antonym: to utopify.

e.g., The Hunger Games' Panem is a dystopified version of today's America, with many parallels and metaphors.

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

caprasic - Comes from the Latin word "'Capra," referring to the goat family. Caprasic means "goatlike." It might refer to any of a goat's renowned qualities or representations, but particularly frivolity or childish curiosity. Similar to capricious but is a more positive adjective.

e.g., My mother's more caprasic than many people of her vintage -- she always wants to know new things.

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

awesomnity - Noun related to adjective awesome. When saying people are awesome, you might refer to them as possessing "pure awesomnity" -- or something along those lines.

e.g., My sister is pure awesomnity.

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

unignorable - Something so obvious you can't ignore it, often something bad so people would want to pretend it didn't exist. | Someone really awesome who it would be outrageous to ignore.

  
  

e.g.,

It was unignorable that there was no way Ernest could get his job back. You can't tell the owner of the company "Up yours" followed by "Go eff yourself and the horse you rode in on" and not have repercussions. |

"How was your date?" "She was … unignorable. That's as generous as I'll be. … Oh, what the hell. She was another linebacker, not at all like two blind dates I had where my dates were dolls. Married the first one inside a few months … and lived happily ever after, for fifty-two years plus. Lucky me.

"The second got short shrift from me -- because I was hook-line-and-sinker gone by the time she showed up on the scene. The only reason I dated her at all was that I needed a date for a mandatory fraternity function."

submitted by wordgoat - (www)

wristophobia - Fear of wrists, or simply being repulsed by them. Often related to the fact that veins are so prominent in this area. {ED. Reminding your … favorite editor that she needs to get back to work on her canonical list of phobias, terms of venery, etc.}

e.g., I have serious wristophobia; seeing wrists makes me feel ill.

submitted by wordgoat

consistentpatience - When you are constipated you need consistent patience on the toilet. Consistipatience, constipatience.

e.g., I tried and tried to defecate and had to use consistent patience to finally have a bowel movement. {ED. TMI, Frank, but the editors are in a generous mood today.

submitted by Frank - (www)

cotelling - Combining camping with staying in a motel; it involves bringing a cooler into your room, cooking on a campstove in the parking lot, and using your sleeping bag for extra warmth or bed space. {ED. The only kind of camping my wife and I ever cared for.}

e.g., We saved a bundle when we went to Lake George by cotelling for a few nights. Campstove coffee beats cappuccino any day.

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

stupir - An act/action so idiotic (or stupid), it leaves the observer completely dumbfounded or in a stupor.

e.g., omg--did you see linda try to light her cigarette by bending over the kerosene lamp? what a stupir! she's got no eyebrows anymore.

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

usrael - A made-up word that captures the essence of the political economic and military merger of Israel and the United States.

e.g., Iran views its geopolitical struggle as a conflict with Usrael.

submitted by Norman Elliott - (www)

chalast - A combination of confidence, sarcasm, grace, talent, pride, dettachment, boldness, and sharpness. Chalast does not necessarily imply virtue. One who has chalast has no shame or embarrassment in making any public reputation of themselves as long as they see it's merit.

e.g., What someone with chalast would say: I understand the business, I hear it: to have an open ear, a quick eye, and a nimble hand, is necessary for a cut-purse; a good nose is requisite also, to smell out work for the other senses. I see this is the time that the unjust man doth thrive. What an exchange had this been without boot! What a boot is here with this exchange! Sure the gods do this year connive at us, and we may do any thing extempore. The prince himself is about a piece of iniquity, stealing away from his father with his clog at his heels: if I thought it were a piece of honesty to acquaint the king withal, I would not do't: I hold it the more knavery to conceal it; and therein am I constant to my profession. (taken from a monologue by Autolycus in "A Winter's Tale" by Shakespeare)

submitted by Callum Nissen - (www)

self-abrogation - Self-deprecation for lawyers.

e.g., Lawyers don't need to commit suicide; they just self-abrogate. | The interrogation was a success -- the criminal self-abrogated before a question was asked and told us everything. A lot more than we wanted to hear. Some of us missed the bus home. You can self-deprecate all the time, but once you self-abrogate, you're done.

submitted by chronecro - (www)

self-abrogation - Self-deprecation for lawyers.

e.g., Lawyers don't need to commit suicide; they just self-abrogate. | The interrogation was a success -- the criminal self-abrogated before a question was asked and told us everything. A lot more than we wanted to hear. Some of us missed the bus home. You can self-deprecate all the time, but once you self-abrogate, you're done.

submitted by chronecro - (www)

self-abrogation - Self-deprecation for lawyers.

e.g., Lawyers don't need to commit suicide; they just self-abrogate. | The interrogation was a success -- the criminal self-abrogated before a question was asked and told us everything. A lot more than we wanted to hear. Some of us missed the bus home. You can self-deprecate all the time, but once you self-abrogate, you're done.

submitted by chronecro - (www)

self-abrogation - Self-deprecation for lawyers.

e.g., Lawyers don't need to commit suicide; they just self-abrogate. | The interrogation was a success -- the criminal self-abrogated before a question was asked and told us everything. A lot more than we wanted to hear. Some of us missed the bus home. You can self-deprecate all the time, but once you self-abrogate, you're done.

submitted by chronecro - (www)

petance or pettance - (n) An obsession or love for pets or animals: SPEC., that interferes with priorities, that is excessive (esp. seriously limiting one's potential), that is mired in immorality or indecorum, or that is somehow taboo or warped. Pet + romance. Petance: pee-tens; pettance: pet-tens. Petantic, petantical, petantically.

e.g., Her pettance was so strong within her that she would give CPR "bare" to wild animals. | Animal wranglers and the like often display petance by putting their lives in danger to get that perfect photo, by doing what they love, etc. | Her petance did not fully add up logically, because she questioned him about eating hamburger and she wore leather.

submitted by Marcus Mitchell - (www)

petance or pettance - (n) An obsession or love for pets or animals: SPEC., that interferes with priorities, that is excessive (esp. seriously limiting one's potential), that is mired in immorality or indecorum, or that is somehow taboo or warped. Pet + romance. Petance: pee-tens; pettance: pet-tens. Petantic, petantical, petantically.

e.g., Her pettance was so strong within her that she would give CPR "bare" to wild animals. | Animal wranglers and the like often display petance by putting their lives in danger to get that perfect photo, by doing what they love, etc. | Her petance did not fully add up logically, because she questioned him about eating hamburger and she wore leather.

submitted by Marcus Mitchell - (www)

petance or pettance - (n) An obsession or love for pets or animals: SPEC., that interferes with priorities, that is excessive (esp. seriously limiting one's potential), that is mired in immorality or indecorum, or that is somehow taboo or warped. Pet + romance. Petance: pee-tens; pettance: pet-tens. Petantic, petantical, petantically.

e.g., Her pettance was so strong within her that she would give CPR "bare" to wild animals. | Animal wranglers and the like often display petance by putting their lives in danger to get that perfect photo, by doing what they love, etc. | Her petance did not fully add up logically, because she questioned him about eating hamburger and she wore leather.

submitted by Marcus Mitchell - (www)

petance or pettance - (n) An obsession or love for pets or animals: SPEC., that interferes with priorities, that is excessive (esp. seriously limiting one's potential), that is mired in immorality or indecorum, or that is somehow taboo or warped. Pet + romance. Petance: pee-tens; pettance: pet-tens. Petantic, petantical, petantically.

e.g., Her pettance was so strong within her that she would give CPR "bare" to wild animals. | Animal wranglers and the like often display petance by putting their lives in danger to get that perfect photo, by doing what they love, etc. | Her petance did not fully add up logically, because she questioned him about eating hamburger and she wore leather.

submitted by Marcus Mitchell - (www)

nemeither - (v) 1. To agree 2. Agreeing while overly exhausted: synonymous with "me neither." 3. the third person's expression when all three parties agree in the negative.

e.g., Amy: "I don't want to go out." Bea: "Me neither." Clarice: "Nemeither." | Craig: "Did you just say nemeither?"

submitted by abomb - (www)

nemeither - (v) 1. To agree 2. Agreeing while overly exhausted: synonymous with "me neither." 3. the third person's expression when all three parties agree in the negative.

e.g., Amy: "I don't want to go out." Bea: "Me neither." Clarice: "Nemeither." | Craig: "Did you just say nemeither?"

submitted by abomb - (www)

nemeither - (v) 1. To agree 2. Agreeing while overly exhausted: synonymous with "me neither." 3. the third person's expression when all three parties agree in the negative.

e.g., Amy: "I don't want to go out." Bea: "Me neither." Clarice: "Nemeither." | Craig: "Did you just say nemeither?"

submitted by abomb - (www)

nemeither - (v) 1. To agree 2. Agreeing while overly exhausted: synonymous with "me neither." 3. the third person's expression when all three parties agree in the negative.

e.g., Amy: "I don't want to go out." Bea: "Me neither." Clarice: "Nemeither." | Craig: "Did you just say nemeither?"

submitted by abomb - (www)

duhmb - Exhibiting extreme idiocy in any given situation.

e.g., Ellen set her hair on fire by bending over the kerosene lantern to light her cigarette. How duhmb can you be?

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

duhmb - Exhibiting extreme idiocy in any given situation.

e.g., Ellen set her hair on fire by bending over the kerosene lantern to light her cigarette. How duhmb can you be?

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

duhmb - Exhibiting extreme idiocy in any given situation.

e.g., Ellen set her hair on fire by bending over the kerosene lantern to light her cigarette. How duhmb can you be?

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

duhmb - Exhibiting extreme idiocy in any given situation.

e.g., Ellen set her hair on fire by bending over the kerosene lantern to light her cigarette. How duhmb can you be?

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

«available» - «available»

e.g., «available»

submitted by «available» - (www)

«available» - «available»

e.g., «available»

submitted by - (www)

«available» - «available»

e.g., «available»

submitted by - (www)

verbalexting - Method with which to express an idea or thought, in words, by texting it. {ED. Verbal texting, I suppose, would be saying something, having your smartphone recognize, and then sending a text message.)

e.g., I suggest verbalexting your idea, as difficult as it may be.

submitted by Tony Zaccaria - (www)

lumpatious - (adj) Pessimistic; rude, mean, not very likable.

e.g., Don't have such a lumpatious attitude.

submitted by Jenna - (www)

lumpatious - (adj) Pessimistic; rude, mean, not very likable.

e.g., Don't have such a lumpatious attitude.

submitted by Jenna - (www)

lumpatious - (adj) Pessimistic; rude, mean, not very likable.

e.g., Don't have such a lumpatious attitude.

submitted by Jenna - (www)

lumpatious - (adj) Pessimistic; rude, mean, not very likable.

e.g., Don't have such a lumpatious attitude.

submitted by Jenna - (www)

f&f - Abbreviation for "file and forget."  Used with either "file" or "folder" (as in "F&F file" or "F&F folder"), it is the final repository for mandatory paperwork that is created as a result of procedural requirement but is ultimately unnecessary or of no consequence.

e.g., The police officer took a report when my iPhone got stolen, but I'm sure it wound up in the F&F file.

submitted by Bicycle Bill - (www)

f&f - Abbreviation for "file and forget."  Used with either "file" or "folder" (as in "F&F file" or "F&F folder"), it is the final repository for mandatory paperwork that is created as a result of procedural requirement but is ultimately unnecessary or of no consequence.

e.g., The police officer took a report when my iPhone got stolen, but I'm sure it wound up in the F&F file.

submitted by Bicycle Bill - (www)

f&f - Abbreviation for "file and forget."  Used with either "file" or "folder" (as in "F&F file" or "F&F folder"), it is the final repository for mandatory paperwork that is created as a result of procedural requirement but is ultimately unnecessary or of no consequence.

e.g., The police officer took a report when my iPhone got stolen, but I'm sure it wound up in the F&F file.

submitted by Bicycle Bill - (www)

f&f - Abbreviation for "file and forget."  Used with either "file" or "folder" (as in "F&F file" or "F&F folder"), it is the final repository for mandatory paperwork that is created as a result of procedural requirement but is ultimately unnecessary or of no consequence.

e.g., The police officer took a report when my iPhone got stolen, but I'm sure it wound up in the F&F file.

submitted by Bicycle Bill - (www)

netteranian - An individual who could (or has) posed for illustrations of diseases or conditions in medical books or journals. This is in reference to the famous Illustrator and Author, Frank Netter, MD.

e.g., Intern: "That one-legged obese man in the wheel chair smoking a cigarette with the oxygen mask on top of his head is a classic Netteranian." Attending Physician: "Yes, but his Medical Insurance pays well."

submitted by Richard W. Mondak - (www)

netteranian - An individual who could (or has) posed for illustrations of diseases or conditions in medical books or journals. This is in reference to the famous Illustrator and Author, Frank Netter, MD.

e.g., Intern: "That one-legged obese man in the wheel chair smoking a cigarette with the oxygen mask on top of his head is a classic Netteranian." Attending Physician: "Yes, but his Medical Insurance pays well."

submitted by Richard W. Mondak - (www)

netteranian - An individual who could (or has) posed for illustrations of diseases or conditions in medical books or journals. This is in reference to the famous Illustrator and Author, Frank Netter, MD.

e.g., Intern: "That one-legged obese man in the wheel chair smoking a cigarette with the oxygen mask on top of his head is a classic Netteranian." Attending Physician: "Yes, but his Medical Insurance pays well."

submitted by Richard W. Mondak - (www)

netteranian - An individual who could (or has) posed for illustrations of diseases or conditions in medical books or journals. This is in reference to the famous Illustrator and Author, Frank Netter, MD.

e.g., Intern: "That one-legged obese man in the wheel chair smoking a cigarette with the oxygen mask on top of his head is a classic Netteranian." Attending Physician: "Yes, but his Medical Insurance pays well."

submitted by Richard W. Mondak - (www)

burgalerd - To be robbed. The actual word is burglarized.

e.g., We got home and we saw the window smashed in. Oh, my gosh. We got burgalerd.

submitted by That One guy

burgalerd - To be robbed. The actual word is burglarized.

e.g., We got home and we saw the window smashed in. Oh, my gosh. We got burgalerd.

submitted by That One guy

burgalerd - To be robbed. The actual word is burglarized.

e.g., We got home and we saw the window smashed in. Oh, my gosh. We got burgalerd.

submitted by That One guy

burgalerd - To be robbed. The actual word is burglarized.

e.g., We got home and we saw the window smashed in. Oh, my gosh. We got burgalerd.

submitted by That One guy

table pizza - A pizza for sharing amongst a group, typically ordered as a side dish to main meals,

e.g., Man, we should get a table pizza, too.

submitted by Tim Stevens - (www)

table pizza - A pizza for sharing amongst a group, typically ordered as a side dish to main meals,

e.g., Man, we should get a table pizza, too.

submitted by Tim Stevens - (www)

table pizza - A pizza for sharing amongst a group, typically ordered as a side dish to main meals,

e.g., Man, we should get a table pizza, too.

submitted by Tim Stevens - (www)

table pizza - A pizza for sharing amongst a group, typically ordered as a side dish to main meals,

e.g., Man, we should get a table pizza, too.

submitted by Tim Stevens - (www)

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