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dogma style - Some people have no style at all. It's like they blew in from Pluto much less dark side of Moon, comrades. Dogma style [is] meaning, strictly according to rules and regulations, laws, requirements, demands. Once you get used to it, it's quite similar to that "Sharia" stuff. Try it, somebody else might like it ... not.

e.g., Mine autonomous Uncle once decided to live his whole life according to the Principles of Dogma Style, very interesting. The commune evolved into group of logically sensibly Controlled yet Satisfied Unit. Nex trep [sic], pull plug, allow extreme dogma style to metamorphose into next rational development, with divine intervention, if really necessary.

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

ptamma - When someone eats an Egg and it tastes delicious.

e.g., (Simon eats an Egg) "Mmmm, this egg is ptamma."

submitted by SoggyEggs7 - (www)

musstretching - To do stretching exercises while you listen to music

e.g., I didn't hear my coach calling me because I was musstretching

submitted by Schey - (www)

sninner - The word is a blind in which I gathered the words snack and dinner to express the meal that we eat after the afternoon snack and before dinner. It would be used when someone did not eat anything in the snack time and he also did not want to have a large dinner -- or have dinner before its usual time due to not being hungry or have some stuff during dinner time.

e.g., Tomorrow, we are going to a concert at 8 p.m so we will have a sninner at 7 p.m

submitted by Maria - (www)

connectholic - A person who needs to be connected with others all the time.

e.g., I'm a connectholic because I need to be connected on internet, all the time.

submitted by Milagros - (www)

lovate - Used to express that you both love and hate a person.

e.g., I lovate my ex-boyfriend.

submitted by Maria - (www)

computholic - Someone who is addicted to computers.

e.g., My son is a computholic.

submitted by Milagros - (www)

yold - A blend in which I have gathered young and old to describe a person who is young but behaves as an elderly one.

e.g., My friend Leticia is yold: she is 22 and she never goes out --only with her boyfriend, to whom she seems to be married.

submitted by Maria - (www)

connectholic - A person who needs to be connected with others all the time.

e.g., I'm a connectholic because I need to be connected on internet, all the time.

submitted by Milagros - (www)

computholic - Someone who is addicted to computers.

e.g., My son is a computholic.

submitted by Milagros - (www)

stump-broke - He didn't use the term "stump broke," but a junior high school classmate of mine told me he had had sex with a cow, first mounting a stump before mounting the cow. Simply didn't occur to me at that age that he wasn't telling the truth. I recently learned the applicable slang to use to describe the cow: stump-broke, or stump broke.

Thursday, February 17, 2005

For those of you looking for meaning.


stump-broke

1. Unquestionably obedient. A "stump-broke" mule is a mule which has
been trained to back up to, and stand before a stump for purposes of
passive sexual intercourse.

e.g.,


'What's wrong with my nose? I'll tell you what's wrong with my nose. I
asked Gunther if he had his girl-friend stump-broke yet, and he hit me on
it, that's what.'

# posted by Lawrence @ 12:17 PM

submitted by [Travis] - (www)

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oilitics - The politics of oil. I've tired of the beltway politicians -- years ago. Among several things I find particularly annoying is their oilitics. Will they ever take the steps necessary to making the United States energy independent -- or are they just going to continue to talk and never really do anything.

e.g., I've tired of the beltway politicians -- years ago. Among several things I find particularly annoying is their oilitics. Will they ever take the steps necessary to making the United States energy independent -- or are they just going to continue to talk and never really do anything. Nasty letter to follow.

submitted by HD Fowler

corn flake - ddd

e.g., ddd

submitted by ddd

skirtish - Akirmish with a woman, aka a skirt.

e.g., I got into a skirtish with my wife over when I will cut the grass.

submitted by Rick Lawrence - (www)

outstoundishing - Outstanding, astonishing, and astounding. Hopefully it will replace those greatly overused words: awesome and amazing. {ED. Have you noticed how overused exclamation points are. My motto is "Let your words be your exclamation points. Sorry it took so long to get this entered -- I must have forgotten to his add when I ran across it earlier.

e.g., Wow! That Rolling Stones concert was outstoundishing!

submitted by John Duckering and Tasha Schwiefert - (www)

ludology - The study of games, a real word.

From Oxford dictionaries: The study of games and gaming, especially video games: "ludology, like the games it studies, is not about story and discourse at all but about actions and events."

e.g., since this is primarily a slang site, we’re pretty lax in terms of gramm

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

"pop" corn - An ironic financial arrangement whereby adult children "treat" their father by purchasing his movie ticket and he pays for the snacks. However, the extensive and expensive modern movie fare means that Pop pays out several times the price of the tickets.

e.g.,
Thanks, kids, and I don't mean to rue it --
you want to buy my ticket, and it's kind of you to do it;
but I'm left broke and financially forlorn
when it costs me eighty dollar to buy the "pop" corn.

submitted by Machiavellean & Lesko

spicelist - It is a specialist in spices and the use of them. Pronounced spice-sha-list.

e.g., Several major spice companies have introduced new spices that were developed by their specialists in spices, otherwise known as "spicelists."

submitted by Rick Lawrence

the wainwright phenomenon | machiavellean speculation, - What accounts for our experiencing that time seems to pass faster as we grow older. It's not necessarily that our contemporaneous experience of time is that it seems to pass faster -- to me, a twenty-four hour day still seems to last as long as it ever has -- but that our memory of an event that took place years ago causes us to think, "Has it really been that long since that happened?"

And, of course, the pseudocorollary says that when we go back to see places we experienced as a child, we will think, "Wow, this place seemed a lot larger when I was growing up."

e.g., "Mary Beth, have you noticed how much smaller Old Main seems to be than it was when we went to high school?"

"I have. Mike, it's the Wainwright Phenomenon again. ... Besides,the building is no longer there. It was torn down about thirty years ago. Hadn't you noticed?

Unabridged

submitted by machiavellean - (www)

macroxenoglossophilia - Lover of long, strange words. I almost feel as if I'm cheating entering this. I thought of it only after seeing the pd entry for macroxenoglossophobe, a pseudo-word I can't recall ever seeing before today. (ED. Macroxenoglossophobe may actually be a real word. Hard to tell from what I can turn up with a Google search.)

e.g., "Some of my best friends are macroxenoglossophiles." "Oh, I'm so sorry to hear that. When will they be getting out of prison?"

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

kevin - (n.) A strip of bacon. [From movie star Kevin Bacon's name, but not capitalized.]

e.g., Hey, can I get a couple of kevins over here? I'm starving.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

chive - (Pronounced "KIVE," to rhyme with 'five'; n.) A repository of knowledge, especially one organized alphabetically, as in "R-chive," "Q-chive," "S-chive," "L-chive," etc. It's also useful for topically arranged repository, such as an "icthyo-chive" (about fish) or a "pharmakeia-chive" (or maybe just "pharma-chive," about drugs) or a "chive-chive" (about chives, scallions, onions, and similar herbs).

[Derived from the word "Archive," based on the "ar" being taken to mean "r." A friend and I were talking on the phone, and I mentioned a file being on my "f-drive." But he thought I'd said "s-chive." Once we worked out what he thought he'd heard me say, we came up with the "a-chive, b-chive, c-chive" idea fairly quickly. This entry is the result. (Cf. "nager" herein)] {Duplicate.}

e.g., "I am a student of chiropterans."
"Well, we have a huge chive on bats---that is, chiropterans."
"Is it in the C-chive?"
"No: we keep with our info on reclusive billionaire crime fighters ... in the Bat-chive."
"That is easily the worst pun I have ever heard."
"Yeah, sorry. Still, the info on bats really is over here in the B-chive."

--------------------
The Pseudo-Dictionary is a neologism-chive.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

dwimmercraft - (Rhymes with "HIM-er-laughed"; n.) 1. Magic, as in stage-magic: the mildly miraculous "fun" of illusion and sleight of hand; but also 2. black magic, as in sorcery: engagement in or manipulation of the powers and deceits of the enemy.

[From the Old English dwimor "phantom, illusion" + craeft "art," often (usually) applied back among the Anglo-Saxons to magic that is either evil or at least non-Divine.]

e.g., "The amazing Armando?"
"Yeah: he's a magician. He's really good. The kids love him."
"Hm. He practices dwimmercraft."
"What?"
"But the innocent stuff, right? Not the dark crap."
"What are you talking about?" "He's dwimmercrafty."
"Dimmer ... ?"
"Never mind. How much does he charge?"
"$200 a show."
"Wow. Dwimmercrafty for sure."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

tora - (n.) An overbearing woman.

[From the Spanish toro "bull," with a feminine ending. Some will condemn the word as yet another put-down of strong women by men who fear them. But I know many many strong women. I also know various toras, all of whom seem to think that their femininity is somehow bad and that if they pretend to be masculine, it will somehow empower them. In short: I'm not against strong femininity; the toras are.]

e.g., "Wow. Your boss is a jerk!"
"Tell me about it: all she does is strut around chewing that stupid gum and talking like a drill sergeant."
"A total tora."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

skinship - (n.) 1. a. A relationship advanced far enough to allow physical contact (beyond handshakes or the occasional bump); b. a relationship as in sense 1, but with skin-to-skin privileges; 2. Physical contact as a means of bonding (a parent hugging their little one, for example, or close friends sharing a supportive hug).

[Apparently a term from Japanese and/or Korean, where it is used solely in sense 2. That's evidently still a common definition, and it corresponds to the definition I looked up on the Urban Dictionary. Sense 1, however, is the one I heard from my 21-year-old son, who seemed surprised I didn't know the term. I don't think he even knows about sense 2.]

e.g., Most people have a skinship with their blood kin as well as their best buddies, but hugging someone you have no skinship with will get a mouthful of loose teeth, or a stiletto heel in the eye ... depending.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

dictionary.coma - What the pseudodictionary may turn into if we don't start getting a few more more lively submittals. No, we won't go blue. We'll die before we let that happen.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

meatgrinder - A female prostitute who uses a variety of moves to make the time she spends with a given customer as short as possible.

e.g., Yes, I broke up with the bitch. I found out she was a meatgrinder, in no way limiting her twerking to me.

submitted by beelzebub - (www)

shikaminka - When you are deeply in love with someone you always carry part of that person with you. The part you carry with you is shikaminka. {Ed. Lower-cased this to keep it from appearing to be a love tribute. Take not of the guideline: names of your friends or enemies will not be accepted. Given that I recognize "minka" as being a name, I'm giving you a little leeway just in case.)

e.g., However far away you go from your love, you will never be alone because you carry shikaminka.

submitted by Shawki Morssi - (www)

downunderwear - Brief briefs that you might wear somewhere in Oz or adjacent points ... ? {ED. Paul, it's nice to see that you've stuck with us for what -- maybe fifteen years now? Thank you for your contributions.}

e.g., At the beach this year I'm wearing fresh new downunderwear, new colors, new designs, new styles ... Look good, feel good, display your packages with ribbons, buttons, and bows, maybe ... !!

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

cthulhoid - (kuh-THOO-loyd; adj.) 1. Like or resembling HP Lovecraft's Cthulhu, an enormous, vaguely manlike creature with a huge betentacled head (like a Whovian Ood or Peter Jackson's watcher in the water from his Lord of the Rings movies); 2. any huge, tentacled monster (resembling Cthulhu) like those appearing in many 50s and 60s monster movies. [From Cthulhu (probably from Greek chthonic "of the earth") + -oid, Greek "like, resembling"). Cthulhu was such a horrifyingly alien creature that his very existence was antithetical to human sanity; indeed, two of the men who discover Cthulhu's house in the South Pacific actually die from simple exposure to him.]

e.g., Giant squids, according to 50s movie lore, were terrifyingly big and powerful cthulhoids who could crush ships and submarines and drag their hapless hulks and crews to a crushing, soggy death in the dark abysses of the sea.

submitted by s - (www)

mudluscious - (adj.) 1. Covered with puddles to splash in and wonderful mud to make mud-pies with and play in when you're a child and it's spring; 2. full of mudpuddles, regardless of whether you want them there or not.

[From e.e. cummings' "in Just-," which also contains the marvelous adjective 'puddle-wonderful.']

e.g., When I was a little boy, I loved rainy days, especially the mudluscious ones, when I could sit down in the lovely muck and make castles and faces and mountains … it's like Play-Doh from Heaven. | Why did they make us park in this mudluscious and puddle-wonderful unpaved lot?!! These are $300 shoes!

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

tapezzate (or tappezzate) - To fill a space with something Etimology: Latin verb tapitiare, which modernly became tappezzare in contemporaneous Italic.

e.g., I tappezzated my room with ... posters. | I tappezzated the city with fliers.

submitted by Snowberry - (www)

welunfair - Combination of the words welfare and unfair.

e.g., The last Wednesday of the month is the day many receive their meager social assistance cheques. It should be called Welunfair' Day because the amounts of money are not enough, to live on, in any expensive city.

{ED. The pd is not here to serve as a venue for expressing opinions about race, religion, politics, etc. It's here primarily to be used as place to host your invented words and examples of how to use them. Given that it's a pseudo-dictionary and not a real dictionary, it's sometimes used by its owners and favored submitters to pass along existing words they found interesting -- for whatever reason. And, since they own the site, they also use it as a pseudo-blog -- or something. Ordinarily, we'd (the editorial we: Betsy, Lillith, Machiavellean, and me, HD.) delete an entry such as yours from the input queue and it would never see the light of day. We'd take it to be less a new word than an expression of your opinion. Bear in mind, too, that you run the risk of annoying Buzzsaw Lillith if you express an an opinion that raises her ire. It's difficult in the extreme to come out ahead in an argument with Lillith -- even if you were dealing with
From The Quote Verifier: Who Said What, Where, and When


"Never pick a FIGHT with anyone who buys ink by the barrel." Some-times including "and newsprint by the ton," this piece of advice usually gets passed around without an attribution ("As they say," "In the old adage," etc.). When credit is given to anyone at all, it most often goes to Mark Twain, sometimes to Ben Franklin, or Oscar Wilde, Winston Churchill, H. L. Mencken, Will Rogers, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, Bill Clinton, New York mayor Jimmy Walker, University of Texas football coach Darrell Royal, or Los Angeles Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda. William Greener, a press aide to President Gerald Ford and other political and corporate figures in the 1970s-1980s, called the admonition "Greener's Law." According to Barbara P. Semonche, director of the Park Library at the University of North Carolina School of Journalism and Mass Communication, no one has ever determined the origins of this commonly cited quotation. "Ink by the barrel" was a phrase often used in the late nineteenth century.

Verdict: Author undetermined.

submitted by Danny Kostyshin - (www)

pooripheral vision - The seeming lack of ability to notice someone trying to get around you.

e.g., "Though the store was not what you might call crowded the pooripheral vision of some of the customers made the shopping experience less than pleasant!"

submitted by Baby Hughey - (www)

prozactive - The state of mind brought about by not caring if you achieve anything you set out to do on any given day. {Duplicate.}

e.g., "He knew he was going to have to be Prozactive about his to do list if he was going to enjoy his night on the town!"

submitted by Baby Hughey - (www)

occurance - Occurrence: something that hapens; an event that hapens. Of the mispelings of occurrence, the most comon is occurence -- failing to double the leter r.



My guess is that the mispeling does not ocur often enough for it to become an alternate corect speling.

e.g., "These poems are full of humor, introspection, and managing to find inspiration in the smallest of things and occurances."

submitted by Miss Speller

miraboize - (v.) (MEER-uh-boh-eyes) To take unauthorized possession or make technically illicit use of property that would otherwise likely be permanently ignored or thrown away by its original owner, especially if such property has already been unused for some time.

Noun form: miraboization. Adjectival form: miraboized (attributive).

Etymology: From the character Miror B. (original Japanese name: Mirabo) in the 2005 video game "Pokémon XD: Gale of Darkness," about whom I have written fan fiction in the past. Though this fiction technically constituted a breach of intellectual property rights, the character was never revisited officially and the game is of course now making virtually no further money; to the rights holders, this character is thus almost certainly a permanent throwaway.

e.g., As the only person in town whose favourite food was Brussels sprouts, Jonathan felt no qualms about miraboizing the company's vegetable platter three days after the big meeting.

submitted by hamilcor

surelockhomos - Someone with a very high degree of gaydar -- you can feel it in the seat of your pants, maybe everywhere.

e.g., We call him Detective Surelockhomos for he can finger a 'member of the 'gay'community' quick as a twink, or whatever .. [ this entry should be 'OK' as the 'author' is a boner fide but nonpracticing case in hand .. ] ..

submitted by P I Edic - (www)

rickety-swag - (adj.) 1. marvelous, super-cool, magnificent, or (in the language of my youth) righteous; 2. the opposite of trondaleuse (q.v.), which evidently means "sad, pathetic, miserable." [A mixture of "swaggy," a new slang term (I'm told) meaning "cool" + "rickety," Robert Heinlein's coinage for "cool" in his novel "Time for the Stars"---a bizarre combination, but my 14-year-old daughter likes it. "Rickety-swag" is thus as far beyond "swaggy" as "cool" is beyond "okay."]

e.g., I liked the 2005 Fantastic four; I don't think I like the 2015 one. In modern teenspeak, one might say that, while I think the earlier film was rickety-swag, I'm afraid the 2015 movie was kinda trondaleuse. Still, I might change my mind.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

trondaleuse - (TRAHN-dah-looz, rhymes with "ON the news"; adj.) 1. sad, disappointing, uncool; 2. the opposite of rickety-swag (q.v.), which apparently means "super cool plus." [Coined by my 14-year-old daughter.]

e.g., "You have a paper due tomorrow?"
"Yeah, and I haven't done any of it. What am I gonna do?"
"Whoa! That is so trondaleuse."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

lack 'o wanna - Alternatively, lackowanna. No desire or inclination to do something or other, at all.

e.g., Even though I put all my cards on the table, Miss Penellope Goodenough exhibited complete lackowanna to my generous proposals.

submitted by P I Edic - (www)

candlebar - (n.) 1. Bicycle handlebars used as a two-candle candelabra; 2. by extension, the (successful) reuse or recycling of any discards and the odd cast offs (especially when done in a classy way).

[Coined, in this sense (there are several senses, apparently), by Michelle Luker with her "candlebar" on Pinterest. This led me into the second sense as I pondered the expansion of its use linguistically.]

e.g., "What's that on the table? Is that...? What is that? A centerpiece? That's so cool."
"It's a candlebar. It's made out of classic fifteen-speed Olympic bike handlebars."
"How many? Is that, like five or six?"
"Yeah: six, but it's a kind of chandelier. So that's like, a chandelbar?"
"Okay, that might be a bit weird."

------------

"He's using the back halves of a bunch of '57 Chevys as garden seating?"
"Yeah: it's a 50s themed garden party. Take a look at the big screen: it's like a drive in theater."
"With waitresses on roller-skates?"
"Yeah. This is real candlebar thinking."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

equi regis - (ECK-wee RAY-gees (hard 'g'), if you speak Latin, REE-jiss, if you don't; n.) 1. An irretrievably bad situation; (adj.) 2. irreparable, 3. hopelessly gnarled or shattered; (adv.) 4. in a manner reminiscent of hopeless irreparability.

[Short for 'omnes equi regis et omnes milites regis' "all the king's horses and all the king's men," who, like everyone else, cannot repair broken eggs, nor put back spilled yolks. Also 'omnes equi militesque regis' "all the horses and men of the king."]

e.g., "How bad was the quake?"
"10 point 0."
"Holy crap."
"Yeah. Thirteen Billion in damages."
"Thirteen?!!---"
"Billion. Yeah. Fires everywhere, burning what didn't already fall down."
"How many ---?"
"Fourteen thousand, so far."
"How do we ...?"
"Fix it? I'm not certain we can."
"Equi regis."
"With fries."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

maggotoni - Ole fashion treatment for festering wound: Place live hungry maggots on a wound, they will consume dead flesh and clean up wound .. [neat, eh wot] .. !!

e.g., A treat for your maggots And that certain hurting body part, everybody benefits !! Maggotoni does the trick ... mutual interactive cooperative effort, no sweat.

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

derrierre ogate - A deconstruction of the word, "derogate" -- to disparage or belittle by exposing one's buttocks.

e.g., A neighbor drives past with a haughty sneer
When she sees me lounging in my yard with a cigar and a beer
Her superior attitude I really hate
The "end" result -- I must derriere ogate.
So when she goes by, tomorrow or sooner,
I'll bend over, drop my pants, and "moon" 'er!

submitted by Charlie Lesko - (www)

expecially - Especially. I make the ytpo so often, it's time for me to make it a word. Well, a pseudo-word at least.

e.g., I expecially appreciate all the support you gave me during the low points of 2009. There were far too many of them -- and you helped me a great deal in getting past them.

Love,

Miss Samantha Speller

submitted by Miss Speller

commonwealth accent - Americans aren't very well tuned to the distinction accents from the former British Empire, making the term useful in avoiding being embarrassed.

Used it for the first time this morning at store where my computer was being repaired.

e.g., "I spoke with a woman earlier who had a Commonwealth accent." "We're originally from Zimbabwe."

submitted by HD Fowler

ailimentary canal - How your alimentary canal should be referred to when you're talking about someone who's a pain in the ass.

e.g., It's truly a pain in the nether orifice of my ailimentary canal to try to deal with idiots such as TotallyRandomName.

To lie is to say something you know to be untrue. Ergo, obfuscating and lying are not the same thing. Not even synonyms. As a matter of fact, not really even close to being synonyms.

Obfuscations and falsehoods are not the same thing -- and even a falsehood isn't necessarily a lie. It's a lie only if the one making the statement knows that what she's saying isn't true.

submitted by beelzebub

apolology - An insincere apology, one where the "apolologizer" is laughing out loud to herself as she apolologizes. Yes, lol's to herself. Don't hold your breath waiting for me to use the construct again. From a ytpo.

e.g., "If you didn't get /that/ message, then you probably didn't get the one where I apolologized for the automatic reply sent by whats.the.fun.of.that."

submitted by Miss Speller

lobbyism - (n.) 1. The practice of lobbying; 2. the belief that lobbying (ie, educating or influencing legislators (legally or illegally)) is an unavoidable (if sometimes undesirable) element of democratic government; 3. pejorative: lobbying perceived as a 'corporate legislature,' in which only wealthy companies or interests have any representation, their opponents having no say because they have no money to afford a lobbyist.

[Apparently a "real" word, but limited (in those dictionaries which record it at all) to definition 1, above.]

e.g., I can see that legislators and other governing persons might need people to educate them about particular issues, since no one has enough time to learn all about them through personal experience, but lobbyism worries me, since only the wealthy---companies, practitioners, and interested parties---have the wherewithal in money, time, or experience to hire lobbyists. You don't often hear about lobbyists seeking to_lower_the cost of pharmaceuticals.

submitted by scott m. ellsworth - (www)

gissipeuse - A gossip columnist.

e.g., "Her audience included ... New York Post famed gossipeuse Cindy Adams, and Derek Hough."

submitted by HD Fowler

idt - I don't think. {ED. Three words that you're extremely unlikely to ever hear me use in that order. (Almost wrote "juxtaposed that way," which is what I thought of first.)}

e.g., Idt that I'm going to buy a new keyboard.

submitted by Ali - (www)

shmuggle - A shmuggle is a cross between a hug, a smoosh, and a snuggle.

e.g., She gave me a big shmuggle when we met after so long apart.

submitted by Earl Egdall - (www)

avetrol - (Like "have a troll," without the initial "h"; n.) A bastard. [Apparently an old, rather grandiose term for one born illegitimately, both literally as well as figuratively (i.e., as an insult).] Adjective: avetrolic; adverb: avetroly.

e.g., Ernie was supposed to accept the deed and then sign it back over to Ed and Emily in a joint tenancy. But once the deed was signed over, Ernie decided to keep it. It took over a year to get it back. Ernie: what an avetrol. Both Leonardo da Vinci and Confucius were avetrols: we don't know who their fathers were.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

retributionable - (adj.) Calling for or worthy of retribution or reprisal.

e.g., This term was coined by the writers of the kids TV show "Young Justice" (season 1, episode 14 'Revelation') wherein the Joker (Batman's infamous enemy), realizing his plans have been frustrated by a bunch of children (the sidekicks), labels his loss "inconceivable! unacceptable! retributionable!" and then proceeds to note in an aside that "that last one might not be a word." He is mistaken, of course: the term is made up of already accepted morphemes in an acceptable pattern, and everyone who hears it understands what it means. That's all that's required for something to be a word.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

sophiliquent - Wise, eloquent, psychedelic, chill, and cool all at the same time.

e.g., When you're high on drugs, you may think you're sophiliquent -- until you realize you're wearing adult diapers because you can't control your bladder. {ED. Why do you think Teen makes the commercials with the woman singing happily at the top of her lungs as she's driving her car? They want to make you think driving around in a wet diaper is a lot of fun. Guess what -- it isn't.}

submitted by [sophiliquent]

apaythetic - Dissatisfied with what you're being paid.

e.g., I cnn understand firing her for being apathetic, but it doesn't seem right to fire her for being apaythetic. Never heard her a make a big issue of it.

submitted by Miss Speller

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then - Than. I see then used on the Internet when the word should be than. Until I made a ytpo a couple of minutes ago, I thought it happened because the writer didn't know the word to use. Now I've decided most of the occurrences may be due to keying errors.

e.g., Better then Democrat Underground, DailyKos, HuffPo, Media Matters, MoveOn....

submitted by Miss Speller

shebang - According to Dr. Goodword, this has another meaning than the one we're familiar with: "A drinking establishment for the poor; a tavernous shanty"

e.g., As far as I know, Jim no longer wastes "time in the shebangs by the river night after night."

submitted by [Dr. Goodword] - (www)

bax - The back of the dvd box that gives the synopsis, cast of characters, and other specifics related to the film.

e.g., We weren't sure which movie we wanted to take out of the library, so we read the bax of each, and decided "Room" was the one for us.

submitted by jeanine wisniewski - (www)

penny-scanning - When you're desperately broke and have no money at all until payday, penny-scanning under the couch cushions, car seats, in drawers and pockets of old clothes, is what you have to do.

e.g., Penny-scanning turned up $37.53 and I had enough to buy beans and milk for the family until Friday.

submitted by Steve McDonald - (www)

eisegy - (ICE-uh-jee; n.) One's personal interpretation of something---a work of art, a piece of literature, or a beautiful vista, vel cet.---as opposed to an analysis of the artist's, writer's, or God's intent in the presentation.

[A shortening and reapplication of "eisegesis," which means interpretation (usually of scripture) expressing primarily one's own notions and biases.]

e.g., True and full interpretation of art or literature or a great view of the mountains consists of two emphases: The first, with which we are all familiar, is an analysis of what the creator of the work put in it---that is, what that creator intended the work to mean. And everyone wonders, during that analysis, whether the author or writer (or God) really put certain interpretations in the work. But the more interesting, second emphasis is the eisegy: What did (or does) the work bring out of the viewer or reader? What does the work do to US who are looking? How does the work mesh with our own experience? Why? It's actually a lot more interesting in some ways than studying what the maker made, to see what the maker's creation makes of us who experience it.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

apoikotic - (Rhymes with cap-oh-ick-COT-ick; adj.) Of or pertaining to settlers, pioneers, or colonists. [From Greek άποικος apoikos "settler"; a shorter version, apoic (cap-OH-ick), saves space but doesn't sound as good.]

e.g., Irrigation is almost always, archaeologically speaking, the apoikotic solution to arid or desert agriculture. || "Apoikotics 101? What's that?" "The study of settlements: the 13 colonies, the Celtic migration, Greek colonies in the ancient Mediterranean, Australian convict transportation, the Polynesian expansion, and so on."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

writhered - Skin that is both wrinkled and withered.

e.g., The old woman had writhered skin and needed a lift, so I picked her up and took her to a specialist for de-writhering.

submitted by Earl Egdall - (www)

to the fourth power - (adv.) 1. A toast given either to encourage someone to go beyond the boundaries set for them or the limitations they have accepted, or to recognize that someone has done so; less poetically, 2. to recognize that someone is or is willing to go outside their comfort zone.

[From mathematics---the first, second, and third powers, of course, correspond to the three dimensions: linear, square, and cube; to raise a number to the fourth power is to go beyond the comfortable reality to which we are used.]

e.g., "So, you're on your way. You've put aside the froth of the world and walked open-eyed into the chaotic splendor of truly finding yourselves in the mad rush of reality: dating and mating, networks and schmoozing, debt, perqs, and cruising. I envy you the journey you are beginning, where mine is nearing its end. Revel in it! To the Fourth Power!" ||

"I've never performed surgery on an extinct animal before, and here I'm supposed to extract organs and harvest DNA." "Hey: to the Fourth Power!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

sympanthaumatos - (Rhymes with sim-pan-ta-MATT-dose (or, more Greekly, sym-pawn-cow-POT-dose); n.) The Marvel Comics universe, which seems to have taken control of a significant share of the modern motion picture industry. [From Greek σύμπαν sympan "the universe, all things" + θαύματος thaumatos "of [a] marvel": literally, the "universe of marvel" or the "marvel universe."] The adjective form would be "sympanthaumatic," and the process of somethings becoming, entering, or being made part of the marvel universe would be "sympanthaumasis."

e.g., It seems like i can't turn around without bumping into the sympanthaumatos: Everything's Thor, X-Men, and Captain America. I don't see much of the DC comics world; it's all sympanthaumatos.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

astropolemic - (adj.) 1. Of or pertaining to Star Wars and its various themes, plots and subplots, characters, settings, tech, dialog, etc.; 2. of or pertaining to interstellar war, which, I am delighted to note, we have not yet had any experience---and, it is to be hoped, we do not have any experience for a

[From the Greek αστρο- astro-, combining form of αστέρι asteri "star" + πολεμικ, derived adjectival form of πόλεμος "war."]

e.g., I'll admit, 35 years ago, I loved all things astropolemic; now, however, I just don't feel it .... maybe I'm too old. || I remember fantasy literature classes exploding with astropolemic theories about the Force, the Jedi, the nature of the empire, and where George Lucas could take the story next. I'm not sure any of us kids expected the astropolemic denouement we ultimately received, nor the sequels. || When our colonies on Alpha Centauri B declare independence in 2253, we'll find out what real astropolemics are like.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

-stan - (noun suffix) A sociogeographic suffix meaning "place of the ____s, the blank being the main or a major characteristic of the particular area to which the speaker wishes to draw attention.

[From from the ancient Indo-Iranian *stanam "where you stand." E.g., Kazakhstan "place of the Kazakhs," Afghanistan "place of the Afghans," etc. See "Stans" herein.]

e.g., Politically, one might call the major cities in the U.K. "labouristan" (la-BOR-is-tan), and the countryside generally "conservatistan" (con-ser-VAT-is-tan), just as you could call the west coast of the U.S. "liberalistan" (lib-er-AL-is-tan). Meteorologically, islands in and lands bordering the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico sit in "hurricanistan." India was once known a the "place of the Hindus": "Hindustan." One might call Medieval Mexico City "Azteckistan." Well, you get the idea.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

stans, the - (n.) The seven Asian nations whose names end in "-stan": Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan, Turkmenistan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Afghanistan, and Pakistan. The suffix "-stan" comes (we think) from the ancient Indo-Iranian word *stanam, which meant "where you stand" (more or less): "your place."

e.g., Citizens of the Stans suffer from crushing poverty in many areas, but the cultures they are part of are rich and delightful.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

fakestudism - It refers to the people who always do well on tests, assignments, or competitions while always pretend to be lazy in public.

e.g., He said he never practice and always be lazy but always does well on competitions. This is typical fakestudism!

submitted by Hugh Zhu - (www)

bonivict - A person who has a good or benevolent and uplifting air after having lost; a good-sport; a good loser.

e.g., I was nervous to tell my friend that I got the part he wanted in the play, but he was such a bonivict, I had no need to worry in the first place.

submitted by Thomas Litchev - (www)

yoctominute - Two seconds = one yoctominute. {ED. FYI. You may or may not be aware of it but a yoctosecond is a real unit of time. Seeing it led me to define yucktosecond in the pd. "Until now, the second smallest unit of time named has been a yoctosecond (10-24 second) or one septillionth of a second."}

e.g., It takes one yoctominute to open a refrigerator.

submitted by Ali - (www)

goldeneye - (n.) An orbital (or at least high-altitude) atomic weapon designed specifically to produce an electromagnetic pulse (an "EMP"), shutting down (or rendering inoperative) electrical equipment.

[From the title of the James Bond movie Goldeneye, in which Janus (the bad guy) attempts to use a nuclear EMP device to rob the Bank of England and destroy its electronic records, sending the world into disastrous financial chaos.]

e.g., It is well to fear goldeneyes: they are strategic tools of terrible effect and devastating precision---utterly disrupting every electrical, and digital, advantage the victim army or city has without blowing anything or anyone up. Still, ignorance has created quite a few erroneous beliefs. No one's running about wearing tin-foil pyramids on their heads, perhaps, but still, some of the myths would have people believing goldeneyes ineffective because of some apocryphal countermeasures which, in truth, no one has taken; others, however, see goldeneyes as the apocalypse. Neither point of view is true, however.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

macheography - (Rhymes with MACK-(or MOCK)-bee-DOG-ruff-ee; n.) A formal word for fight choreogaphy. In fact, it's from the Greek μάχη mache "battle" + γράφω grapho "write" (just like choreography comes from χορός choros "dance" + grapho "write.") Occurred to me after I submitted "swordeography" (q.v.), a word suggested by a child (and it's a cool word, honestly); mine's just his word in Greek. Doubtless it's my linguistic arrogance. Still, "macheography": it sounds good.

e.g., Have you ever seen "Hero"? That show's got some amazing macheography.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

swordeography - (Also swordography, n.) 1. The choreography of sword-fighting, for movies and plays and such; also, more generally, 2. fight choreography for fights with hand-to-hand weapons of any sort. [Coined by a little boy from "sword" + "eography" (from "choreography," as in fight choreography).] Agentive: swordeographer, swordographer. Also "fighteography," "fightography."

e.g., The Hero movie has some amazing swordeography.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

incumbentcy - How the word incumbent should be spelled. Suggested by a ytpo in my previous entry. A google search shows that the word appears on the Internet ~250 times. Exmples are taken from the Internet.

It appears that even "learned" folks aren't necessarily good spellers. On the other hand, based on the time in history some of the examples were written, it may well be that incumbentcy was once the correct or preferred spelling, but eventually gave way to incumbency. If that were the case, though, shouldn't a reference to the change in spelling have turned up?

e.g.,

  • "Incumbentcy has become a decease, a pandemic and we have the cure." |

  • "The faculty produces the feeling of obligation, incumbentcy, right and wrong, for which we have no single definite expression in the English language; just as Ideality produces the sentiment of Beauty. Justice is the result of this sentiment, acting in combination with the intellectual powers. " |

  • "It was a regulation not extending to useful incumbentcy, nor to those preferments which gave a title, like our freehold, and a tenantcy for life." |

  • "Besides, if a customer is using Teradata already, the Sunopsis solution can be a good way to improve their incumbentcy (sp?)." |

  • "At 12/02/2007 02:23:00 PM, Campaign Manager said... While I will refrain from such vociferous phrase of Mahoney -- I haven't followed his legislative record closely enough -- I will say that I always thought that the stories of his vulnerablity were vastly overrated.

    The inability of the NRCC to recruit Joe Negron into the race (the inability to recruit the top candidates is becoming something of a trend for them), the advantage of incumbentcy, Mahoney's fundraising prowess, and the fact that the seat isn't all that Republican. The seat also has a very difficult geography, snaking all the way across the state, covering multiple media markets, and generally making it very difficult to campaign in.

    Yes, Bush won 56% of the vote, but ultimately, that's not so much of a landslide that we should be surprised that a Democrat would hold it. Is is a Republican advantage? Yes, but not overwhelmingly. The voters in the 16th are not rapid (sic), right wingers, foaming at the mouth -- they are moderates who consistently re-elected a man (Mark Foley) who was widely known to be gay."
    |

  • "'I will floor him just as I have done to others in the previous elections', he said and called on Ghanaians to stand up against any attempts by the NPP to use its incumbentcy to win the impending elections." |

  • "[Theodore Roosevelt] became a third partie (sic) canid (sic) ateafter abandoning his former republican (sic) partie (sic). He created a partie (sic) called the 'Progressive Party' in which he tried to form a last stand to protect his incumbentcy. But his switch in parties (sic) dur (sic) to not losing the republican (sic) vote managed to spark contriversial (sic) voting.

    The election of 2009 provided a progressive movement close to the election of 1912." {ED. This seems to have been written by a student -- a student who needs to use a spellchecker, I'd say.} |

  • "Better The Gorillas Of Rwanda

    Better the gorillas of Rwanda are given birth certificates
    Within a brief while of their visiting the earth,
    Their security is guaranteed by the state machinery
    Basking in the full confidence of three meals a day,
    Not wary of political repression based on suspicion,
    They have a national day in their honour
    Fully agitated for clean environment
    By the political incumbentcy.

    alexander opicho" |

  • "PA just got a Democratic gov, ending a cycle of incumbentcy party-switching that's gone on for 60 years. Lord_Emwurst, Nov 4, 2014." |
  • "Anonymous said ...

    In [a] sane world the meeting would be to discuss a small carton of milk way in the back of the fridge that is long past it's (sic) expiration date. Just a sad statement on the effects of long incumbentcy.

    September 28, 2010 at 7:56 AM" |

  • "There has been a meeting of Christ Church seat holders, at which the conduct of the Bishop relative to the incumbentcy, was severely censured." |

  • "To: Protect the Bill of Rights

    I have heard people calling it the Incumbentcy(sp)Protection Act

    4 posted on 02/15/2002 12:48:39 PM PST by linn37" |

submitted by Miss Speller - (www)

skotonolatry - (Rhymes with crow-toe-MALL-uh-tree; n.) The strange need television and movie-makers exhibit to fill their work with gratuitous violence and death; and the equally worrisome tendency audiences seem to have in enjoying blood and mayhem.

Derived forms: skotonolater "one who practices skotonolatry" & skotonolatrially "in the manner of a skotonolater." [From the Greek σκοτώνω skotono "to kill" + λατρεία latreia "worship"; literally "kill-worship."]

e.g., Modern TV is just loaded down with beautiful young "good guys" running all over murdering people. Their skotonolatry seems to be more and more like some kind of blood quota ... in gallons. || Skotonolaters don't like G-rated movies: nobody dies.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

psychotripsy - (SIGH-co-trip-see; n.) Soul-crushing bad news or bad treatment, such as a dear John letter or a truly miserable dead-end job. (Adj: psychotriptic; adv.: psychotriptically.)

[From the Greek ψυχή psyche "mind, soul" + τριψις tripsis "to pound, crush, wear out."]

e.g., "What's wrong?"

"Angie dumped me."

"Oh, wow. I'm sorry, man."

"And my boss says I gotta work three twelve-hour shifts this weekend."

"That's just psychotripsy. You oughta quit."

"I wish."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

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