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- Google «"atom bomb" vs. "atomic bomb"».

 

e.g., Google «"in to" vs. into».

 

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    {ED. Nice try at promoting your commercial site, Sonya, but it's not gonna fly. I know a guru when I encounter one -- and you're no guru.}

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- (ED. From a submitter who made such a stunningly insensitive remark shortly after my wife's death that I have absolutely no intention of accepting any further submittals from him. I've even considered removing all of his previous submittals, but that would be a lot of work given that there are over 400 of them. Right now, I refuse to waste an e-mail on him. Perhaps some day I'll relent, but not yet.)

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"come, play..." scent - A small, seemingly insignificant happening, such as a brief whiff of a somewhat familiar perfume, that instantly evokes a nostalgic recall of a past, happy event. {ED. Reading those words evokes memories well over 60 years old -- the sulfur smells of a coal fire in the blacksmith shop down the street from my grandmother's house. Getting too close, the fire burns my eyes.}

e.g., I am sitting in my comfortable leather chair, reading, pleasantly warmed by the fire burning low in the fireplace, when I come to the words, "a summer night baseball game in a small town." Long forgotten images start swirling through my mind. I feel light-headed, sit back in my chair, and close my eyes. Am I having a "come, play …" scent moment? Suddenly, I am back there. …  
 
My father, home early from work, enters through our front door. He is wilted and sweating from the hot, early evening July sun. "Hey kids," he says, spotting me, my sister, and brother watching TV in the living room, "It's going to be a beautiful night. Let's go see the Triplets beat the crap out of Wilkes Barre tonight!"  
 
My mother comes in from the kitchen, wiping her hands on her apron. "Good idea," she says, "It's too hot to cook." While my mother gets ready, my sister and brother run around, yelling and shrieking, hitting each other, like all little kids do when they're excited. Before long, we pile into the car and are off to the ball park home of the Triplets, the NY Yankee farm team, serving all of us baseball-crazed denizens living in the industrial-based, three small adjacent communities, collectively called, "the Triple Cities."  
 
Now, once again the dusty aroma of the wooden bleachers, baking in the sun, rises, a pleasant smell, while the rest of the crowd comes in, noisily, bumping and jostling each other to get as comfortably arranged on the hard wood seats as possible. We hear the satisfying, sharp "crack" of bats hitting balls while the Triplets continue warm-up practice, then shouts of derision, boos, and insults from the crowd when it's Wilkes Barre's turn to warm up.  
 
The game starts. It's Whitey Ford, our best pitcher's turn on the mound, and our fans greet him with great cheers and shouts, "Kill them, Whitey!" "Let's go, Triplets!"  
 
Hot dogs are meant to be eaten outdoors. They taste the best then-- the vinegary and sharp bite of the mustard flows into the beefy juices of the slightly salty flavored meat. Bubbles in the bottle of my Nehi cream soda pop run up and tickle my nose. I drink it too quickly -- I feel hot in the warm sun, and anxious for the soda's cooling effect.  
 
The game progresses as the teams strive mightily to overcome the other -- the crowd loud in its favoritism, moves, and intermittently sits and stands through the long innings, while the sun steps down and weakens in its arc, until a chill touches the air.  
 
The night clicks on the stadium lights, bright and shining in the dark, and swarms of moths, like luminous clouds of living confetti, flutter up to, and dance in a circle all around the glow. High above, night stars twinkle in celebration of a perfect summer night. I'm out of school with long days until September, and I'm here, young and vigorous, having a great time, yelling and laughing with my neighbors, enjoying the company of my Mom and Dad, and even the two "brats" behave, and I am remembering it all -- a special summer night baseball game in a small town, the night when the Triplets "beat the crap" out of Wilkes Barre.

submitted by Charlie Lesko

"quarantine-like" - An obfuscation of the legal term used by the CDC definition of the word quarantine: not quarantined. {ED. Sort of like AT&T's contracting with customers for "unlimited" data transfers and then using throttling to limit the amount of data transferred. Or great-grandfather's thinking he was signing up for unlimited sex with great-grandmother when they got married. Even in the days before women's liberation, that was never going to happen. GGF may have been up for sex, but he wouldn't get any unless GGM was willing to go along with him, even if she wasn't all that interested. My GGF found another woman who WAS interested -- in a nearby small town.}

e.g., The Executive Branch placed the Army in "quarantine-like" isolation.

submitted by Ira Agatstein - (www)

"rap" punzel - A contemporary folk tale about a female American singer, famous for her musical renditions in the Rap music genre.

e.g., Winner of five grammy awards for her hit albums and singles, Sylvia "Rap" Punzel had led a life of total seclusion away from the musical stage. Her stern stepmother-manager kept her from all social contact, in their tower-mansion, high in the hills of Hollywood. A. Gootkindova Prince, famous in his own right as an Eastern European folk singer, met her one night when they were both guests on the David Letterman Show, and immediately fell in love with her. Unfortunately, "Rap" Punzel's empty life left her emotionally cold, distant, and unfeeling. Undeterred, A.G. Prince followed her to her mansion-tower, and, every evening, serenaded her, patiently, with warm and gentle love songs and lullabies. In time, "Rap" Punzel relaxed, let down her hair, and returned his love. They married, and unlike most Hollywood love stories, they lived together, happily ever after.

submitted by Charlie Lesko

"so shall" ite - A dictator of either gender.

e.g., Our neighbor, Beverly, is a down-to-earth contributor to our community. She pitches in at PTA functions, chauffeurs kids and runs errands at sports events, and handles her assignments on her church committee without any complaint. When it comes to her husband, Will, however, she acts as a true "so shall" ite.

submitted by Charlie Lesko

"the" - As in the word the but with quotes, "the." Vernacular-punctuative distinction placed on the noun preceded by article; when spoken, emphasis is simply placed on article rather than noun.

e.g., I went to see "the" Kate the other day. Variants: I went to see "the Kate" the other day. I went to see The Kate the other day.

submitted by Ronnie Donn

#rosinesing - To #rosinesing is to take a picture of yourself fanning everyday items in front of your face. "Some Twitter users are mocking Rosines' photo by taking photos of themselves flaunting everyday items, calling the craze #rosinesing."

e.g., Hey, Clarice, come over tonight and we'll spend some time #rosinesing.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

$200k - Used when describing an athlete with bottom-dwelling skills. Refers to the $200,000 minimum salary of major-league baseball players. Two-hundred-K.

e.g., Did you see that scrub they brought in to pitch in the 7th inning? He was so $200k.

submitted by Dan Levinson

$mas - The gift-giving holiday that now begins in mid-October and ends in early January.

e.g., Look at all the loot I got for $mas.

submitted by Wendy

ēĥatrasǔdōġenic - (Ee-at-ra-syoo-doe-jen-ic) The state of mind when somebody has only a single thought in her head.

e.g., Tom was focused on passing his driving test. He was ēĥatrasǔdōġenic.

submitted by stan

π.Χ. "pi-chi" - (Rhymes with sigh-key, but sometimes pronounced to rhyme with sci-fi; adv.of time) 1. My version of "Before Christ"--_before_is Anglo-Saxon, but_Christ_is Greek: ΧΡΙΣΤΟΣ ‘Annointed One.' My solution is to put both words in the Greek: προ Χριστού _pro Christou_‘before Christ.’ The acronym is π.Χ. (p.Ch. if you transliterate into English letters). Of course, some don't like using just the Chi (X) because of the "they've-taken-Christ-out-of-Christmas" conundrum (I'll not go into it here (save perhaps by a brief paralepsis: The_X_in_Xmas_should not be pronounced "eks," since it is, in fact, the Greek letter Chi (pronounced 'key' or 'kai': so the word "Xmas" should be pronounced, not "eksmuss" but "keymuss." Not that that pronunciation will catch on any time soon). Anyway, if someone needs to be sure that I'm not deleting God from the term, I sometimes say it "pie-KEY-row" (πΧρ).

e.g., I sometimes feel bad about everyone BCE-ing all the BCs. I measure time from the birth of my Lord; calling it something different changes nothing, so I use my π.Χ. It doesn't really bother anyone I know, and it makes for a fun bit of conversation. If anyone really has a problem about such things, I think we ought to simply switch to positive and negative numbers. (But I'd get rid of that idiotic year 0; all it does is confuse everyone. Isn't the 0 the moment between the last second of year -1 (1 π.Χ.) and the first second of year +1?).

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

'as - Has as a Cockney might say it. Suggested by my inadvertently leaving off the h in an e-mail.

e.g., "So far, the Google Political Correctness Police either haven't noticed the gmail account or decided not to bother deleting it -- as 'as happened to several accounts I've opened in the past."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

'boss - Short for emboss. Used as a verb. To 'boss something is to emboss it.

e.g., That font could use a little dimension. Can you 'boss it?

submitted by Filip

'cha - Interjection. Used to agree with a statement, sometimes sarcastically or in response to a sarcastic statement. Roughly equivalent to "Yeah, right." From an expression oft uttered by a character on the television program Mad TV, the Lancome Lady, played by Nicole Sullivan.

e.g., Paul: Looks like we're due to get dumped on this winter -- fun, fun, fun. Debi: 'Cha! I can't wait to dig my car out of the snow.

submitted by P-Man

'cube - 1. Ice. 2. Cubicles. 3. Dice. 4. Box(es) 5. Anything even remotely cube-shaped that you want to name in a derogatory manner. 6. Anything even remotely cube-shaped that you want to describe and make sound cooler than "a box" or "a square."

e.g., 1. Hey, put some 'cubes in my soda, will ya? 2. Who's working in the third floor 'cubes today? 3. Toss those 'cubes, Robbie -- it's your turn. 4. So what's in these 'cubes lying on the floor? 5. Stupid 'cube. It went bluescreen and crashed on me. 6. SpongeBob Squarepants is one cool 'cube.

submitted by Rainbow Woman

'flatestrap - A strap used to keep things from inflating.

e.g., Oh, no, the balloon is filling up with gas. We should put the 'flatestrap on it so it doesn't blow.

submitted by ceana

'itis - Sloth-like state of laziness and shirk. Not wanting to do any work, as in hot tropical climates.

e.g., I got the 'itis real bad today. I just can't seem to shake it.

submitted by Dan

'k-nell - An exclamation of surprise or shock. Contraction of a popular expletive, expressing same.

e.g., 'K-nell, don't sneak up on me like that.

submitted by Greg

'n-american - First sound is a glottal stop. A resident of the USA who is not of Anglo-Saxon ancestry.

e.g., Don't call him that. It's bigoted. He's an 'n-American.

submitted by Daniel Spaulding

'peat - Referring to a repeated TV show, especially when one expected an original episode. Something that occurs so frequently it requires a monosyllabic name.

e.g., I was going to watch Six Feet Under, but it was a 'peat.

submitted by James McLaren

'round by laura's (house) - Of going a good distance out of the way when traveling.

e.g., We'd a ben hur too oursago if'n Steve had'n gon 'round by Laura's house.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

'sma'am - [pronounced smam (rhymes with scram); interj.] contraction of "yes, ma'am."

e.g., "Jack! Bring up s'more ammo for your sister's sniper rifle!" "'sma'am!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

'smatterchoo - What's the matter with you?

e.g., 'Smatterchoo? You know you're not supposed to eat cookies before dinner.

submitted by Eric Belt

'sole - Arsehole or asshole, but potentially less offensive.

e.g., You know Chris? He be a complete 'sole.

submitted by dekoi

'soonist - Someone who plays all types of bassoon, including the double bassoon.

e.g., The 'soonist Kyle Newman played a mind-boggling tune in the spring concert.

submitted by Whiz Kid Forte

'spensive - So expensive it becomes 'spensive.

e.g., His boat cost him two fortunes. It sure was 'spensive.

submitted by Rachael Barnes

'splode - To explode in a funny and extremely messy way, usually including food and possibly a microwave. | To have an extremely funny temperamental meltdown or ranting session -- again, a messy but entertaining explosion

e.g., I never saw a microwave peep 'splode in a microwave before. | It was incredible, the way that guest 'sploded on Jerry Springer's show last week. I laughed for six hours straight. Jerry was not as happy about it as I was, having to throw away his favorite tie.

submitted by MsFledermaus - (www)

'streme - Extreme. 'Xtreme.

e.g., What John said about you was way 'streme.

submitted by Rix - (www)

't (space) (verb) - The correct form of 'tis, 'twere, 'twasn't, 'tisn't, and so forth. Such forms as "'tis" ignore the fact that the space being taken out from between the contracted "it" and the "is" itself requires an apostrophe. Following this practice, such a construct would be "'t'is."

e.g., 'T was the night before the holiday the Christians stole from the pagans (well, the one in December, anyway), and all was quiet in the house.

submitted by apeiron

'tude - Slang or short form for attitude. Generally meaning nasty or not nice.

e.g., Just do as you're told, and spare me the rude 'tude, dude.

submitted by Allan Gies

'w'amnesia - A condition where someone vividly remembers the presidency of George W. Bush and still believes the Republicans have a better plan for the economy.

e.g., Millions of voters, suffering from 'W'amnesia, are planning to go to the polls to vote for a candidate who will bring back the economic policies that caused the last recession.

submitted by Scott M

'zaaah - Pizza.

e.g., When we got hungry, we devoured some 'zaaah.

submitted by eli

(cyber) digits - A person's e-mail address, URL, instant messaging screen name, or other web-related contact info. From"digits," referring to a person's phone number. | Phone number, usually extracted from a member of the opposite sex at a singles function. | (n.) Your address and or phone number (and probably your social security number and e-mail address (although e-mail addresses are generally not comprised solely of digits … but then, neither are street addresses)). [Since I don't get out much, I didn't hear this usage until I saw it in a kids' book called Ghostville Elementary from back in 2003.]

e.g., I just got that cute guy's cyber digits. I'm going to e-mail him tomorrow. | Whadday ya think, Smith? Will that chick give me her digits? | "So, how are we going to do this project?" "Forget how. Do we even know WHERE we're gonna do it?" "Hey guys. We can use the old barn behind my house!" "Good idea! what are your digits?"

submitted by Jordana | Gary S. | Scott M. Ellsworth

(en)gineeroglyphs - (n.) 1. the mathematical and quasimathematical symbols used by engineers on plans and blueprints. (n.) 2. (en)gineeroglyphics: the spoken jargon and written ideograms and mathematical symbols of the engineering discipline.

e.g., "Is this the sprinkler system plan? … I don't-- I can't read Gineeroglyphs, get me an engineer."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

(prefix)fucking(suffix) - Tmesis. Infix usage (prefix)Tmesing(suffix) is used for emphasis: "unbelievable" becomes "unfuckingbelievable"; "absolutely" becomes "absofuckinglutely"; "incredible" becomes "infuckingcredible"; "fantastic" becomes "fanfuckingtastic," and so on. Additions to the list may be placed here.

absofuckinlutely -- submitted by: Joseph B. Adams
disfuckingusting -- submitted by: creative guy
unfuckingbelievable -- submitted by: pcgruf

e.g., The number of words submitted that violate our guidelines is infuckingcredible.

submitted by beelzebub - (www)

(word)**n - For a word repeated n times. Where it will display properly, wordn.

e.g., I really**6 get tired of typing the same thing over and over again. | What we really**2 need is some pseudomathematical shorthand to use here.

submitted by HD Fowler

*$ - Starbucks.

e.g., I'm stopping at *$ on the way home -- you want anything?

submitted by Dan Garvin

-(e)ndo - (verb suffix) 1. that must (or should) be X'ed (X being the verb to which the suffix is attached) (from the Latin delenda est Carthago "Carthage must be destroyed" -- the favorite speech-ender of Cato the Elder.)

e.g., "Hey, wanna go see a movie and grab some za?" "Can't: 'The Sun also Rises.'" "What? do it tomorrow, man." "Hey, readendo, dude." | "I can't stand all these glitches … debuggendo!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

-acho - (noun suffix) in Esperanto, adding -acho to the end of a noun makes it bad, filthy, worthless, unworthy, etc.; hence, in English, 1. suffix meaning low, bad, disgusting, filthy, rude, mean, vulgar, and so forth. 2. as a word by itself, something disgusting, bad, vicious, or low. 3. (as a verb) to render something disgusting, filthy, or vile.

e.g., "We're having to use the old junior high school while they rebuild the burned out high school. The trouble is that the old school is … like, schoolacho." | "Wow, man, you stink! Go shower or something, cause you are smellacho." | "The gangs have really achoed this neighborhood: all there is is crackhouses and grafitti."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

-age - Suffix placed on the end of just about anything for no particular reason. Sometimes used just for variety, sometimes used to create interjections from verbs. Used extensively at one time by Amanda Quan of Seattle, WA. | A suffix that can be added, against all rules of grammar and logic, to the end of nouns and verbs to make new nouns and verbs.

e.g., Hook me up some cheeseage. | (After pulling off a difficult nosegrind on your skateboard) Oooh, grindage. | There's a serious lack of foodage in Tony's house. | In the marathon, she expected to be getting her runnage on for at least two hours.

submitted by Zippy Von Zippy | mikedawg56 - (www)

-age --> -agic rule - (n., process) An English suffixation rule [which should be] applicable to nouns ending in "-age," such as "Mage," from which are derived adjectives, such as "Magic" (i.e., the "art of a mage"), which can then become nouns themselves. For some reason, this particular derivational suffix disappeared from English despite the large number of -age words; it is, nonetheless, very useful for the creation of adjectives of slightly different meaning from the currently accepted ones. It helps, moreover, with postpositive constructions, such as "he is an idiot villagic" instead of "he is a village idiot."

e.g., "You're studying anger in traffic accidents?" "Yes, I am interested in all things road-ragic." | "Whether the cup is half empty or half full is irrelevant: our purpose in life is far more than ullagic conundrums." | "Management and Labor are always having wagic arguments." | "How's my lipstick?" "Your lipstick?! Listen, in that decolletagic piece of frippery, nobody's going to notice your lipstick."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

-alia - Suffix (in plural nouns) "Items connected with the particular area of activity or interest mentioned." You can use it to make up words such as "kitchenalia."

e.g., "Steven Weber's leavings [at Huffington Post] also remind me of a particular style of juvenalia -- the eighth-grade boy's attempt at heavy metal songwriting." | "Steven Weber is a moron of the highest caliber. Formerly an actor turned adult writer of juvenalia, he has declared, if I remember right, that his trusty sixth-grade Words for Big Kids! thesaurus is his co-author in his screeds."

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

-ance, -ench rule - (n.) The rule that derives the adjective_French_from the noun_France_. Such a rule, applied to modern English, would be highly productive, since we have so many nouns that end in -ance. Note, however, that the rule applies only to noun:adjective pairs. So, e.g., France : French; :: chance : chench (of or pertaining to chance); dance : dench (of or pertaining to dance); :: glance : glench (of or pertaining to glancing); :: lance : lench (of or pertaining to lances); :: trance : trench (of or pertaining to trances); :: stance : stench (of or pertaining to stances); :: advance : advench (of or pertaining to an advance).

e.g., "Sometimes, chance creates coincidences." "So you think this was a chench meeting?" "Yes." "That's preposterous!" "Oh, I think it's romantic." "… You mean romench, don't you?"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

-arific - Suffix meant to emphasize or increase the importance of a word, either good or bad. (See "-a-licious," "-tastic," and "xtra-.")

e.g., The movie was explosarific.

submitted by Ross

-ass - Emphasis suffix.

e.g., That was a creepy-ass movie. | This is a gross-ass sandwich. | That was a stupid-ass movie.

submitted by lauryn

-dron(e) - (Rhymes with prone; suffix) Attached to a Greek number word (e.g., tetra, dodeka, vel cet.), a three-dimensional geometric construct which must obey your every command. [From -dron "three-dimensional construct" and drone "mindless servants."]

e.g., "Curse you, suitcase! Thou art but a cuboid hexahedrone: Thou hast no power to resist my will! Thou SHALT engulf and contain all this clothing (including the shoes) without unseemly bulging! Thou shalt pop neither thy zippers nor thy seems! Stint not thy capaciousness, hexadrone, lest I summon the wonderly massive sumo wrestler down the hall to sit upon thee and crush thy pride and thy reckless defiance, that I may close thee with thy clasps and zippers, and bind thee with bonds of cord and chain, and, willy nilly, return home, make thee to disgorge all thy contents, and give thee into the hands of eBay!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

-esque - Added to a word to make it descriptive of another object not usually described by the word, or to give the word more descriptive emphasis.

e.g., Her makeup was very Monet-esque.

submitted by Lisa

-gate - Suffix attached to a word to indicate some scandal associated with it. From "Watergate." Used for example in Irangate, Billygate, etc.

e.g., Strangely, the Whitewater scandal was not called Whitewatergate.

submitted by The Puffin

-ifying - Add to the end of an adjective to extend the amount of syllables in a line (poetic sense) or just to make yourself sound "sophistimacated."

e.g., "What do you think of the movie?" Delorfirith asked. "It was so … so … borifying," Fitly replied.

submitted by Delorfirith

-in-a-box - Added to a word such as fun or excitment as sarcasm.

e.g., Paul: This weekend we should like go 'n like do stuff and like, yeah. Tear: Oh, yeah, excitement-in-a-box.

submitted by tear - (www)

-ine - (rhymes with VINE or BEAN; adjectival suffix) When added to a noun ending in "-or" and, at times, in "-er," -ine creates the adjective corresponding to the noun thus suffixed: that is, "of or pertaining to [noun]" (see examples below).

e.g., Anchorine: of or pertaining to anchors; Arborine: of or pertaining to arbors or trees (the English translation of "arbor"); Cantorine: of or pertaining to singers, especially religious singers (as the cantor of a synagogue); Electorine: of or pertaining to voters (electors); Lectorine: of or pertaining to readers, especially one reading a lecture to a group, audience, class, or congregation; Liquorine: of or pertaining to alcoholic beverages; Gatorine: of or pertaining to crocodilids; Neighborine: of or pertaining to one's neighbors; Parlorine: of or pertaining to parlors; Razorine: of or pertaining to razors; Rumorine: of or pertaining to a rumor or rumors; Sailorine: of or pertaining to sailors or a life at see; Tumorine: of or pertaining to a tumor or tumors; Vendorine: of or pertaining to sales or sellers (or a particular sale); Victorine: of or pertaining to a winner, winners, or winning.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

-ing - A suffix to turn a word into a verb -- contrary to the actual rules of English.

e.g., Verbing is a good way of showing that you have far too much spare timing.

submitted by Fionacat - (www)

-ingo - (n., suffix) 1. Socket for (or container or holder of) something; by extension, on its own ("ingo"), 2. The proper place for something (e.g., a battle station, desk, spot on the organization chart, etc.); also 3. The position to which someone aspires or the goal they want to reach.

e.g., "Ow! You don't have any flashlights? Well, this candle's bur--yeow!--burning my hand! Gimme a … whatever it's called … you know: a candle-ingo! Gah! … okay, never mind: I dropped it, it's snuffed. You know, I think I'll just sit here and let my third-degree burns heal in the dark, thanks." | "Minister, Downing Street is your Ingo!"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

-iser - Suffix for kitchen appliances, to make them sound cooler.

e.g., Betty: I just made some waffles in my waffleironiser. Jane: Ha, I just made a smoothie in my blenderiser. Top that.

submitted by sam

-ish - Kind of, sort of. Multi-purpose suffix for everything. Can also be used alone -- usually with a waggle of the dominant hand. |

A suffix (used mostly with adjectives) that means the same thing as "kind of" or "kind of like" when added to a word.

e.g., This is cool … ish. (In response to a question like "How's it goin'?" with the associated hand waggle.) Ish. |

"The house looks purple-ish from this angle," said Sophie. What did you think of the concert's story-ish format?

submitted by Olivia | Katabrain

-ized - Strange American way of ending words. A no-brainer way of turning nouns into verbs. Frowned upon by many pedants.

e.g., British English: The burglar burgled the house. American English: The burglar burglarized the house.

submitted by Keithy

-iznatch - Attached to the end of a word either for emphasis or because you can't remember the rest of the word. Always follows a consonant.

e.g., Emphatic: "Mama, we're out of hot sauce. You'd better get yo'self to the stiznatch." Forgetful: "Yeah, you know, that one word … antidisestablishm … -iznatch."

submitted by Jersey Faceplant

-izz- - Used to extend a word to make it sound gangsta. You split a word in two, the first half in front of -izz- and the second half behind. (ED. Snoop Dogg himself declared izzle-speak to be out.)

e.g., I wizzant that new City Stars deck. It's cizzool.

submitted by alex - (www)

-let - A diminutive suffix. Indicates something is small or cute. Used on proper names (often nauseating in this usage) as well as other nouns.

e.g., Look, a cute little birdlet.

submitted by garth - (www)

-ling - (Word)ling; a smaller, usually less powerful version of anything.

e.g., Where'd you buy that cute little phoneling?

submitted by Rick O'Shay

-mafied - Suffix that just plain sounds cool. Usually intimating that there's been an intentional "change" or effect on something, likely caused by you. A similar ending: -macated.

e.g., After the most fab manicure my fingers are beautimafied.

submitted by jennieB

-ness - A modifier used after a word to make it extra snappy. Can use "sweet," "cool," and many similar words with "-ness." (ED. May be used as a crutch for those with limited vocabularies, unlike the pseudodoctrinati -- whose vocabularies are virtually limitless.)

e.g., "I got a new car." "Niceness."

submitted by Julia

-on-a-stick - Emphasis-adding adjectival suffix.

e.g., That exam was pure fecal matter-on-a-stick.

submitted by sergeantbaker

-orium - Suffix. Added to a word to produce the name of a place where the root word is found.

e.g., I'm going to the bookorium to see what's new. Then I'm going to the foodorium to get some pretzels for a snack.

submitted by sal

-phibe - (Rhymes with TRIBE; n.) 1. One who embraces the dark side of something, especially a twisted version of something good; 2. Someone who, for some reason, attacks that which they hate or fear by characterizing it as horrible, disgusting (etc.) as possible. [From the 1971 Vincent Price film, The Abominable Dr. Phibes.]

e.g., "He's afraid of cats?"
"No. He's actually fixated on dead cats, decomposing cats, zombie ... cats."
"Ah, so he's not an ailurophobe; he's an ailurophibe."

submitted by scott m. ellsworth - (www)

-ship - (n.) 1. A relationship (romantic or platonic) between two people; (v.) 2. To create, observe, or hypothesize a relationship (romantic or platonic) between two people; 3. To recognize and support a particular relationship (romantic or platonic) between two people. [Apparently, my daughter tells me, a type of fan-fiction in which the writer explores relationships contrary to the actual canon.]

e.g., "Jillyship," for example, is evidently fan-fiction slang for the husband-and-wife relationship of James and Lilly Potter (from the Harry Potter books (yes, there really are quite a few people out there who do not know the ins and outs of Potter-dom)); other, noncanonical -ships, include Lupillyship (Remus Lupin and Lilly Evans), Snillyship (Severaus Snape and Lilly Evans), etc. Fan-fiction -ships from other popular works are legion: Sauladrielship (Sauron and Galadriel), Ameriwidowship (Captain America and the Black Widow (I love the little "merry widow" in there)), Tegawho (Tegan Jovanka and Doctor Who), and so on and on. The weirdest, I think, is Gimleowin (Gimli the Dwarf and Eowin the (human) rider of Rohan)).... the Sauladriel one was, for me, the darkest and most disturbing. Any way, there it is: Use it in good health.  
 
Oh! Before I forget: when my daughter was telling me about this, she mentioned a marvelous pun someone made up. It seems that fan-fiction -ships often fall foul of ultra-conservative canonists, who are, shall we say, unfond of such extracanonical dallyings. The response by the fan-fictors is "Don't use your canon to blow holes in my -Ship!" Brilliant bit of wit, there ... brilliant.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

-ski - Suffix added to someone's name, to indicate familiarity.

e.g., Joeski, how are you?

submitted by tim dunk

-stan - (noun suffix) A sociogeographic suffix meaning "place of the ____s, the blank being the main or a major characteristic of the particular area to which the speaker wishes to draw attention.  
 
[From from the ancient Indo-Iranian *stanam "where you stand." E.g., Kazakhstan "place of the Kazakhs," Afghanistan "place of the Afghans," etc. See "Stans" herein.]

e.g., Politically, one might call the major cities in the U.K. "labouristan" (la-BOR-is-tan), and the countryside generally "conservatistan" (con-ser-VAT-is-tan), just as you could call the west coast of the U.S. "liberalistan" (lib-er-AL-is-tan). Meteorologically, islands in and lands bordering the Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico sit in "hurricanistan." India was once known a the "place of the Hindus": "Hindustan." One might call Medieval Mexico City "Azteckistan." Well, you get the idea.

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth - (www)

-tacular - Added to virtually any word to emphasize its spectacular attributes.

e.g., Did you see my sneakers? They are shoetacular.

submitted by Andy Papia - (www)

-tastic - Suffix meant to emphasize or increase the importance of a word, either good or bad. (See "-a-licious," "-arific," and "Xtra-.") | Suffix. When given a root, combines to make an adjective referring to a state of being. Add to the end of a single syllable word to emphasize it, and describe an extreme state of it.

e.g., That food was crap-tastic. | That's gotta be the ultimate shrimp lover's dish. It was shrimptastic.

submitted by Thomas | Ian

-ular - A suffix to emphasize it, in a good or bad way.

e.g., My hair is fuzzular today. Ew. | Those roses are smellular. | Tyrell: I got tickets to Rob Zombie. Johnny: Coolular.

submitted by Katie

. . . and a half - Used in conjunction with an adjective to emphasize it.

e.g., Red: I couldn't get the tickets today. Ted: Damn and a half.

submitted by Ashlee What'sOn

. . . or not - Phrase used when the speaker asks another person a question or makes a suggestion, but is ignored (whether on purpose or accidentally) or rebuked. Speaker uses phrase to recover from the embarrassment of being ignored in public, signaling that speaker can begin or resume work or conversation with others. Can also indicate a "taking back" of suggestion, question, or offer.

e.g., I asked Joann, "Want to go to dinner after choir?" She heard me, but turned around holding food. "… or not," I finished, to save myself from looking dumb. | "Lauri, want to go to the mall?" I asked. She walked past and pretended not to hear me, or perhaps truly didn't hear. "… or not," I finished, to save myself from looking stupid to anyone else that might have heard.

submitted by Tara DellaFranzia

..swice, eitce, neice.. - Have you ever noticed that we have words like once, twice, rarely thrice, and nothing higher? To remedy that situation I propose to continue with something like frice, fice, sice, swice, eitce, neice, and tice. I'm not sure that they would catch on very quickly or easily. {ED. Probably not.}

e.g., Swice did we go to the castle to see the queen, but only frice did we find her there, she being a very busy monarch directing all matters of state.

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

.02012 .30201 - Stands for "elect Barack" [?] in 2012, in PhoneEdics system. Stress accent, check mark, grave accent dot below, dot circle below, and dot circle below, for "elect." {ED. As soon as a Republican nominee for POTUS is selected, we'll need to update this entry, eh?}

e.g., .02012 .30201 and see if that isn't a good choice. Try try again and see if he don't succeed. The opposition may have a tough time coming up with a suitable electable candidate.

submitted by Paul Edic

.03030 - Or .011101110. Simple forms of the name "Obama" in a certain numerical phonetic alphabet: 0 = any vowel, 3 = m, b, p, v, f … (1 = ng, g, k, h), and (2 = all the rest). © 2009 PhoneEdics

e.g., A more complete form of .03030 would include diacritical marks over each number, namely: inverse U, simple dot, small circle, horizontal line, and small circle dot below. This system is simple but probably not easily applied.

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

.com - Use .com, .net, .org, etc. to emphasize.

e.g., That chick is hot.com. That guy is so hot.etc.

submitted by alex

:- - That's a two-character pseudo-colon:- I'll sometimes use it as punctuation in lieu of a colon, primarily when a list follows. Since it's a punctuation mark of my own invention (although I've seen that character string used elsewhere), it's best that no one have the effrontery to tell me I've used it incorrectly. Let's call it a fowler for now.

e.g., Nota bene:- I intend to exchange e-mails with you using the account we started with, and I'll do my best to make sure that happens from now on.

submitted by HD Fowler

:smileyjacked - An unintentional conversion of letters to graphic "smileys" when typing in a chat window.

e.g., Oops, looks like I got :smileyjacked. All these secret smileys are the bomb, don't ya think?

submitted by stennie - (www)

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submitted by - (www)

crampage - A frantic, physical reaction to an acute, intensely painful "freezing" of a leg muscle.

e.g., I awoke from a deep sleep to a mind numbing, continuously piercing electrical shock in the calf of my left leg. Throwing off the bed covers, I jumped out of bed and immediately went into a crampage, stomping around the room and down through the hall, arms flapping, and bellowing like a belligerent water buffalo. It's a scene I'll long remember, as my wife took video pictures of the event.

submitted by Charlie Lesko

anglotard - A stupid or uneducated Englishman. | Behaving in a manner suggesting both stupidity and English origin.

By extension and in general, "___tard" for a stupid, uneducated, or otherwise intellectually deficient person of any nationality -- making future "tard" references not only unnecessary but also redundant. There will have to be something "special" for any such submittals to be accepted from now on. We'll go that far in acquiescing to political correctness and to being sensitive to the feelings of the innocent, but probably not much further. After all, funny is funny, even if someone's feelings get hurt sometimes.

ED: I owe Scott Ellsworth a debt of gratitude for calling to my attention how needlessly hurtful such words can be, in a post he made to the now inoperable forum. It's not political correctness we're giving in to: it's recognizing that words do hurt real people. Remember defiantly saying as child, "Sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me"? Got news for you -- I've dished out far, far more hurt with words than I have physically. And I've been hurt in return.

e.g., The English countryside is littered with offensive anglotards. | The deal was soured by his incessant anglotard rants.

submitted by Timothy Peach - (www)

=) - Happy face: used to signify happiness or joy in a concise fashion.

e.g., so today i was just walking around minding my own bizniz when like omg out of the blue jerry comes up to me and he was just like y'know i know how bad it can be to break up i've had it myself and if you needed someone to talk to then y'know you could always. … i …i'm here if you need someone and then he was just gone out the back door and I was just like =) for the rest of the day (ED. Left as an exercise for the reader to convert into something close to comprehensible -- punctuation, capital letters, and all that jazz.)

submitted by Jbob

?:::::::::::::::: - Linguistic hate mail: the question mark is similar to the phonetic symbol for a glottal stop (as when you close your throat before coughing or in the middle of 'uh-uh'), and a colon, phonetically, indicates the lengthening (usually doubling the length) of the previous sound. Sixteen colons, as here, would mean something like lengthen the foregoing glottal stop by a factor of 2^16. Essentially, this innocuous string of symbols means "stop breathing [indefinitely]" or, more succinctly, "drop dead."

e.g., "Holmes! This telegram is nothing but a question mark and a bunch of colons!" "Of course, Watson! It's Linguistic murder!: Sir Lyle did not have an apoplectic seizure; he was strangled!" "Strangled, Holmes?! By a telegram?!" "Indeed, Watson. This case is unique in the annals of crime! It must be Moriarty!" "But, Holmes, that's absurd. He would have lost consciousness and started brea---" "Do not attempt to understate the depths to which some men will sink to accomplish their fiendish crimes. Do you not recall the foul Emmerson gang who wrought their evil with an Edison gramaphone and a photograph of Rutherford Hayes?! Why … Watson! Watson! What's wrong? Ah, no! Watson, stop reading the telegram! You'll suffocate! Stop! LeStrade! Punch Watson in the head while I seize upon the cursed telegram." "Punch him in the head?! He'll punch me back." "Better you than me. Ready? Punch!" "Cough, cough, sputter … oh, thank you Holmes! I was choking. But that's impossible, isn't it? Cough cough. Excuse me, old friend, while I beat the crap out of LeStrade." "Of course, watson, take your time."

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

@ - (n.) a[n American] republican(?), evidently from the resemblance of the 'at' symbol to an elephant's head (I guess the 'a' is the ear and the loop comes out as the trunk or something). Derived from this, apparently, are "r@" (a reactionary republican), "b@" (a black republican (which I didn't believe rare enough to warrant a term of its own)), "c@" (a conservative republican, as opposed to a "l@" (a liberal republican)), "m@" (a militant republican), and "s@" (a southern republican). It's more of a hieroglyph than a word, I suppose (technically), but I thought I'd submit it.

e.g., "So, this new guy: is he a r@, a c@, or a l@?"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

@ddress - E-mail address, to differentiate between electronic and snail-mail addresses.

e.g., I have a new @ddress. Please update your address book.

submitted by melofelo

@dotcom - An e-mail address.

e.g., "Whats your @dotcom?" "I don't know if it already exists or not."

submitted by wes

ñit-ñit - Used to describe an small object without identity; almost synonymous to the word "thing," but less vague.

e.g., Upon seeing a scrap of paper on the ground: "Chris, pick up that "ñit-ñit."

submitted by Alek

Übercrombie - A brand of clothing worn by popular but incredibly stupid faeries. Can also be applied to equally stupid humans.

e.g., Übercrombie makes lots of money.

submitted by The ghost of Jam Master Jay

übersmüth - Something very smooth in a German kinda way.

e.g., Your leiderhosen complement your übersmüth Heineken.

submitted by jett - (www)

[g]own - Getting owned in some form of competition by a noobsicle. An extreme form of ownage. Originated in Menomonie, WI.

e.g., Sean just got [g]owned by the Gov-Dogg in ping pong.

submitted by Joshua K.

[insert adjective here]-dog - Gratuitously add "dog" to the end of any kind of descriptive. Purely for emphasis.

e.g., Oh, that guitar riff was rock-dog. What a funk-dog bass line that was. I painted my bedroom walls purple-dog. That is one whop-dog haircut, man. . . .

submitted by Caoimhe

[invitatation] - An invitation, explicit or implicit, from a female (girl or woman) to fondle (or at least touch her breasts) her breasts, her tata's.

e.g., She ended up having me charged with sexual assault, but I have absolutely no doubt that she had given me an invitatation before I laid a hand on her. Next time -- if there is a next time -- I'll get it in writing.

submitted by [invitatation]

[to] gwik - (v.) To research a term or phrase, using Google or Wikipedia.

e.g., John asked me what I meant by "to grok," but I didn't have time. I told him to gwik it if he was that interested.

submitted by Rip Waechter

^ - (Pronounced "comp-Q," "net-Q," "cyber-Q," "expo-Q," "Q-ponent," "allo-Q," "lift," "raiser," and, of course, "caret."; noun) 1. The symbol for a question mark in file names where an actual question mark ("?") cannot be used because in cyber-speak, being used recognizes it as, e.g., a wildcard or a boolean marker, and thus will not permit use of the character as part of a file name; 2. A question mark for a question couched in declaratory form. [Apparently from the caret's pointing upward, showing a rising tone.]

e.g., The name of a file containing a photograph of the Artemision Bronze: "Poseidon^ or Zeus^" | "I wonder whether she ever found her way back to that mysterious pub she always talked about^"

submitted by Scott M. Ellsworth

~ - Not. If I'm recalling correctly, this symbol was used in some of my math classes to mean "not." | The symbol is sometimes used to indicate "approximately equal to." In the pd, I've used it to indicate an approximation to what someone said instead of a quotation: see said~. I've also used it to mean "is related to." You can usually figure out what its use means from context, but perhaps not always.

e.g., Sex without commitment is like instruments without music. ~ Frederick the Great | A note at fantasmic: "ED. An opportunity taken to be overly pedantic -- to show when 'such as' should be used instead of 'like.' 'Like' ~ comparison, resemblance, similarity; 'such as' ~ inclusion."

submitted by HD Fowler

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«girl's name» - An obsession with something you can never have. Almost all teenage boys have a|an «girl's name».

e.g., That sexy chick which works at Hot Topic is my «girl's name».

submitted by Stone Merchant

«let's not and say we did.» - Years ago I impetuously came up with one of my boneheaded ideas, saying to my wife, "Let's do such-and such." She said, "Let's not and say we did." It's become a catchphrase in e-mails I write to a friend. I use it almost like a word when I decide to redact something I've written to her. Entering in the pd because another friend thinks it's a wonderful saying. The three of us have known each other for well over 60 years -- but I've never dated either of them.

e.g., You may get an e-mail I've written; you may not. If you do, it more than likely will have a couple of «Let's not and say we did.»s in it.

submitted by HD Fowler

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