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chinage - To rub or pat another person under the chin.

e.g., Ric's mother got upset when he gave her chinage.

submitted by dan bridges

chinaman's chance - Slim to no chance at all. Originally "Chinaman's chance in hell." Slang reflective of a time when Chinese workers in the American West could get only the most dangerous and difficult work, the term is often considered insulting and racist. | Little to no chance at all -- roughly the same as the down-under "You've got Buckley's chance" or "You've got Buckley's." ("What are my chances of . . . going out with you?" "Buckley's.") The phrase seems to have come into common use in the mid- to late-nineteenth century when many Chinese laborers came to the United States to build railroads, dangerous work. The immigrants were paid very low wages and were treated poorly in other ways. Caucasian-dominated legislatures -- including the Congress of the United States -- passed laws preventing the immigrants from ascending the socio-economic ladder. God forbid that they be allowed to become citizens. There appear to have been efforts to deny citizenship to their American-born children as well, but I haven't pursued that tack yet. From Wikipedia: "The Chinese Exclusion Act was a United States federal law signed by Chester A. Arthur on May 6, 1882, following revisions made in 1880 to the Burlingame Treaty of 1868. Those revisions allowed the U.S. to suspend Chinese immigration, a ban that was intended to last 10 years. This law was repealed by the Magnuson Act on December 17, 1943." The linked web page tells about a misguided attempt by a would-be Thomas Bowdler, Huan Hsu, to "ban" the term Chinaman's chance Among other words and phrases Hsu wants banned are chink in the armor, faggot, gobbledygook, niggardly, and spic-and-span. He claims what he is interested in doing is "not shrinking the language — it's evolving it." No, Mr Hsu, what you want to do is shrink the language. Language evolves on its own; efforts such as yours are hardly necessary for its evolution. I see what you are trying to do (as you foolishly and unnecessarily call attention to outdated words and phrases) as working against the evolutionary change you say you want. What you should do instead is grow some, Huan. Having fewer words to use to express ourselves rather than more goes against what pseudodictionariers want to do. Most of us try to be sensitive about how we use our ever-expanding vocabularies, but we won't go overboard about being politically correct.

e.g., "Whatever he says, Mike Huckabee has only a Chinaman's chance of getting the Republican nomination for President." "'Chinaman's chance'? That's just the sort of thing I'd expect a cracker like Huckabee to say." "'Cracker'? That's just the sort of. . . ." | As far as I'm concerned, Huan Hsu doesn't have a Chinaman's chance in his efforts to diminish the English language -- while he says what he's trying to do is not what he's trying to do. The man is better-suited to be a politician than a writer.

submitted by HD Fowler - (www)

chine - To chat online.

e.g., Let's chine tonight at 7:00.

submitted by Jim

chinematography - Steadicam type of cinematography that looks as if the camera was held under one's chin during shooting, either adding to the ambiance of the film as a whole, or making it appear wholly amateurish in nature.

e.g., Blair Witch Project used good chinematography. | I gotta say, those home videos were somewhat lacking. Too much chinematography in them to suit me.

submitted by Paul

chinese cheese - This was a comical mistake my father made when asking me where to put the tea. He was inbetwixt asking me where I wanted the cheese and Chinese tea and it came out "Chinese Cheese."

e.g., Where do you want me to put the Chinese Cheese? Give me some Chinese Cheese.

submitted by Datura

chinese eyes - No, not slanted eyes. Droopy eyes such as one might have after having smoked a pipe in an opium den. Sleepy-looking eyes.

e.g., Although ReGeana feared her guests might know what she had been doing out back once they say her Chinese eyes, that wasn't enough to keep her from indulging in a poke and toke.

submitted by HD Fowler

ching - The sound a disk makes when hitting the chains in disk golf.

e.g., That was a sweet ching.

submitted by Port

ching - Money, shortened version of Ka-ching, the sound of an older cash register.

e.g., "Why are you out here begging?" "Here's the thing, I need some ching."

submitted by rico

chingalow - Low on money.

e.g., I've been kind of chingalow since I got this new job. Better than it was when I was unemployed, though.

submitted by hilow

chingaso - a little thing that you can't remember the name of right now. Taken from Spanish

e.g., Hand me that little Chingaso over there.

submitted by Gyminee

chinger - To look at someone in a less than pleasant manner, then continue to talk about that person in a nasty fashion.

e.g., Chris has been chingering me all day.

submitted by Black Mage

chinglish - A combo of Chinese and English.

e.g., She was speaking Chinglish, so I was able to catch only about half of what she said. Every other word.

submitted by Eve

chinstache - A small patch of long hair on one's chin, but not a goatee or beard.

e.g., It looks like all of DEFROST have chinstaches; they should shave better.

submitted by Xander Bluesummers

chip - Fine, OK, all right.

e.g., Bert: Can I borrow your car, Ernie? ERnie: That's chip with me.

submitted by Nadia - (www)

chip-head - One who is obsessed with computers.

e.g., He's such a chip-head he could draw you a diagram of the internal cicuit of the Pentium 4 microprocessor.

submitted by Stephen Mize

chip-shop - Half-hearted or inadequate.

e.g., Your CV is completely chip-shop.

submitted by mike stringer - (www)

chipmonks - Religious electronics workers.

e.g., The chipmonks aways closed down the assembly line on the Sabbath, which drove Intel management crazy.

submitted by S. Berliner, III - (www)

chipped sheep - This is very much like chipped beef, only it's mutton or lamb. It has its own unique flavor and qualities, appealing to the most discriminating palate, economical when it's cheap chipped sheep, but so far available only on the Moon, where they'll eat just about anything. See you on Luna at the Lunatix Diner. Bring lots of credits and be sure to explore our craters. Our seas may be dry but our teas are quite wet!

e.g., On our recent trip to Luna's famous Sea Side Spa we had the good fortune to try their local dish, chipped sheep a la lune. We arranged to have cheap chipped sheep shipped to our home in Terra's Eighth Quadrant by express rocket before we left Luna.

submitted by Paul Edic - (www)

chippermonky - Hi, I'm Dr. Evil. Due to the lack of 3's we are now changing 3 to chippermonky, so wherever you used to say 3, You will now say "chippermonky" instead.

e.g., 1, 2, chippermonky, 4, 5. I have chippermonky new ideas.

submitted by Chippermonky

chippie - A malicious teenybopper. The chippie lifestyle is exemplified in Seventeen and in television shows directed at the 13 to 18 age bracket. These girls are loud, especially enthusiastic, but insecure. They are generally not very interesting to talk to as their passions range only from boys to shopping.

e.g., In the girl's restroom, the chippies were fixing their makeup and gossiping about the new boy they all thought was gorgeous. Ugh.

submitted by Meredith - (www)

chipple - A very small chip.

e.g., Bob. The chippy filled this bag with chipples.

submitted by Guttius

chippy - Chiefly British expression used to describe the upper classes, particularly their accents.

e.g., He's got a Saville Row suit, a Hermes tie, and a chippy accent. My bet is he's very rich.

submitted by Stephen Mize

chirophany - The signalling of disdain by the showing of finger signals -- one digit in the US, two in the UK.

e.g., Motorists are among the most skilled practitioners of chirophany and, indeed, possess a complex vocabulary based entirely upon this form of communication.

submitted by April 23rd

chiropract - A back formation (get it?) from chiropractor. To manipulate, as by a chiropractor. | To massage.

e.g., Maybe you need to be chiropracted to relieve the pain in your back. | Chiropract my neck, sweetheart.

submitted by HD Fowler

chirp - The sound tyres make when a fast gearchange is made in a manual car or an automatic car equipped with a shift kit. Chirpy, chirping.

e.g., John was hammering the Falcon GT up the road, chirping the tyres on every single gearchange.

submitted by George

chirpacious - Overly cheerful.

e.g., She was so chirpacious it got on my nerves.

submitted by David Richardson

chirpoof - The sound made by a small exploding bird.

e.g., As she sang to it, Cheryl was astonished to see the small robin look back at her and disappear with a chirpoof.

submitted by Misako Kairo - (www)

chirt - Flirting while chatting online.

e.g., Honey, are you chirting again? Get out of that chatroom and pay attention to me.

submitted by Steve Jasper

chisausa? - Expression used by UK kebab vendors, usually of Turkish nationality. Compression of "Chili sauce, salad?"

e.g., "Large doner please, my good man." "Chisausa?"

submitted by Adam Leslie

chitlins - Southern urbonics for "children."

e.g., Git thim chitlins in tha house. It's suppatime.

submitted by steve zihlavsky

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